HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Spinet
A SPINET is a smaller type of harpsichord or other keyboard instrument, such as a piano or organ . CONTENTS* 1 Spinets as harpsichords * 1.1 History * 1.2 Other uses of "spinet" for harpsichords * 1.3 Nomenclature * 2 Spinets as pianos * 2.1 History * 3 Spinets as organs * 4 Notes * 5 References * 5.1 Harpsichord spinet * 5.2 Piano
Piano
spinet * 6 External links SPINETS AS HARPSICHORDS Domenico Scarlatti: Sonata in F Minor K.69 Performed on a spinet by Ulrich Metzner ------------------------- Problems playing this file? See media help . When the term spinet is used to designate a harpsichord, typically what is meant is the bentside spinet, described in this section. For other uses, see below. The bentside spinet shares most of its characteristics with the full-size instrument, including action , soundboard , and case construction
[...More...]

"Spinet" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Jacobean English
EARLY MODERN ENGLISH, EARLY NEW ENGLISH (sometimes abbreviated to EMODE, EMNE or EME) is the stage of the English language
English language
used from the beginning of the Tudor period
Tudor period
until the English Interregnum and Restoration , or from the transition from Middle English
Middle English
in the late 15th century to the transition to Modern English during the mid-to-late 17th century. Prior to and following the accession of James I to the English throne in 1603, the emerging English standard began to influence the spoken and written Middle Scots of Scotland
Scotland

[...More...]

"Jacobean English" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Webster's Dictionary
WEBSTER\'S DICTIONARY is any of the dictionaries edited by Noah Webster in the early nineteenth century, and numerous unrelated dictionaries that have adopted the Webster's name. "Webster's" has become a genericized trademark in the U.S. for dictionaries of the English language, and is widely used in English dictionary titles, or even to dictionaries in general. The only modern dictionaries that trace their lineage to Noah Webster's are published by Merriam-Webster
[...More...]

"Webster's Dictionary" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Elizabethan
The ELIZABETHAN ERA is the epoch in the Tudor period of the history of England
England
during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I (1558–1603). Historians often depict it as the golden age in English history. The symbol of Britannia
Britannia
was first used in 1572, and often thereafter, to mark the Elizabethan age as a renaissance that inspired national pride through classical ideals, international expansion, and naval triumph over the Spanish – at the time, a rival kingdom much hated by the people of the land. In terms of the entire century, the historian John Guy (1988) argues that " England
England
was economically healthier, more expansive, and more optimistic under the Tudors " than at any time in a thousand years. This "golden age" represented the apogee of the English Renaissance and saw the flowering of poetry, music and literature
[...More...]

"Elizabethan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Medici
The HOUSE OF MEDICI (/ˈmɛdᵻtʃi/ MED-i-chee ; Italian pronunciation: ) was an Italian banking family, political dynasty and later royal house that first began to gather prominence under Cosimo de\' Medici
Medici
in the Republic of Florence
Florence
during the first half of the 15th century. The family originated in the Mugello region of the Tuscan countryside, gradually rising until they were able to fund the Medici Bank . The bank was the largest in Europe
Europe
during the 15th century, seeing the Medici
Medici
gain political power in Florence
Florence
— though officially they remained citizens rather than monarchs
[...More...]

"Medici" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition
The ENCYCLOPæDIA BRITANNICA ELEVENTH EDITION (1910–11) is a 29-volume reference work, an edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica
Encyclopædia Britannica
. It was developed during the encyclopaedia's transition from a British to an American publication. Some of its articles were written by the best-known scholars of the time. This edition of the encyclopedia, containing 40,000 entries, is now in the public domain ; and many of its articles have been used as a basis for articles in . However, the outdated nature of some of its content makes its use as a source for modern scholarship problematic. Some articles have special value and interest to modern scholars as cultural artifacts of the 19th and early 20th centuries
[...More...]

"Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bach House (Eisenach)
A HOUSE is a building that functions as a home , ranging from simple dwellings such as rudimentary huts of nomadic tribes and the improvised shacks in shantytowns to complex, fixed structures of wood, brick, concrete or other materials containing plumbing, ventilation and electrical systems. Houses use a range of different roofing systems to keep precipitation such as rain from getting into the dwelling space. Houses may have doors or locks to secure the dwelling space and protect its inhabitants and contents from burglars or other trespassers. Most conventional modern houses in Western cultures will contain one or more bedrooms and bathrooms , a kitchen or cooking area, and a living room . A house may have a separate dining room , or the eating area may be integrated into another room. Some large houses in North America have a recreation room
[...More...]

"Bach House (Eisenach)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Baldwin Piano Company
The BALDWIN PIANO COMPANY is an American piano brand. It was once the largest US-based manufacturer of pianos and other keyboard instruments known by the slogan, "America's Favorite Piano". It ceased most domestic production in December 2008, moving production to China. Baldwin is currently a subsidiary of the Gibson Guitar Corporation
Gibson Guitar Corporation
, the largest American manufacturer of musical instruments. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Notable performers * 3 See also * 4 General references * 5 References * 6 External links HISTORYThe company traces its origins back to 1857, when Dwight Hamilton Baldwin began teaching piano, organ, and violin in Cincinnati
Cincinnati
, Ohio
Ohio
. In 1862, Baldwin started a Decker Brothers piano dealership and, in 1866, hired Lucien Wulsin as a clerk. Wulsin became a partner in the dealership, by then known as D.H
[...More...]

"Baldwin Piano Company" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Larry Fine (pianos)
LARRY FINE (born 1950) is an American piano technician , consultant, and author. He is best known as the author of The Piano
Piano
Book. The Piano
Piano
Book, as of 2001 in its fourth edition, describes how pianos work, discusses and reviews many brands of pianos, tracks changes in the piano industry worldwide, describes the retail piano industry in America with hints for the buyer on how best to deal with piano stores. It also documents innovations in piano building . The book is written from the viewpoint of the piano technician, and thus often emphasizes aspects of piano quality that make it hard or easy for the technician to keep the instrument in tune and in good working order. Over the years, the work has been increasingly a collaborative effort, as Fine has recruited a large number of his fellow technicians to evaluate and report on the pianos that they see in the course of their work
[...More...]

"Larry Fine (pianos)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

The New Grove Dictionary Of Music And Musicians
THE NEW GROVE DICTIONARY OF MUSIC AND MUSICIANS is an encyclopedic dictionary of music and musicians. Along with the German-language Musik in Geschichte und Gegenwart , it is one of the largest reference works on western music. Originally published under the title A DICTIONARY OF MUSIC AND MUSICIANS, and later as GROVE\'S DICTIONARY OF MUSIC AND MUSICIANS, it has gone through several editions since the 19th century and is widely used. In recent years it has been made available as an electronic resource called GROVE MUSIC ONLINE, which is now an important part of OXFORD MUSIC ONLINE
[...More...]

"The New Grove Dictionary Of Music And Musicians" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Business And Technology Education Council
The BUSINESS AND TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION COUNCIL (BTEC) is a provider (existing as part of Pearson Education Ltd) of secondary school leaving qualifications and Further education qualifications in England , Wales
Wales
and Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
. Whilst the T in BTEC it has been mistakenly understood to stand for Technician, according to the DFE (2016) it actually stands for Technology. BTEC qualifications, especially Level 3, are accepted by many universities (excluding Cambridge and Oxford unless combined with more qualifications) when assessing the suitability of applicants for admission, and many such universities base their conditional admissions offers on a student's predicted BTEC grades
[...More...]

"Business And Technology Education Council" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Special
SPECIAL or SPECIALS may refer to: CONTENTS * 1 Music * 2 Film and television * 3 Other uses * 4 See also MUSIC * Special (album) , a 1992 album by Vesta Williams * "Special" (Garbage song) , 1998 * "Special" (Mew song) , 2005 * "Special" (Stephen Lynch song) , 2000 * The Specials
The Specials
, a British band * "Special", a song by Violent Femmes on The Blind Leading the Naked * "Special", a song on
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

International Standard Book Number
The INTERNATIONAL STANDARD BOOK NUMBER (ISBN) is a unique numeric commercial book identifier. An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book , a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-based and varies from country to country, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN configuration of recognition was generated in 1967 based upon the 9-digit STANDARD BOOK NUMBERING (SBN) created in 1966. The 10-digit ISBN format was developed by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and was published in 1970 as international standard ISO 2108 (the SBN code can be converted to a ten digit ISBN by prefixing it with a zero)
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Great Depression
The GREAT DEPRESSION was a severe worldwide economic depression that took place during the 1930s. The timing of the Great Depression
Great Depression
varied across nations; in most countries it started in 1929 and lasted until 1941. It was the longest, deepest, and most widespread depression of the 20th century. In the 21st century, the Great Depression
Great Depression
is commonly used as an example of how far the world's economy can decline. The depression originated in the United States
United States
, after a major fall in stock prices that began around September 4, 1929, and became worldwide news with the stock market crash of October 29, 1929 (known as Black Tuesday ). Between 1929 and 1932, worldwide gross domestic product (GDP) fell by an estimated 15%. By comparison, worldwide GDP fell by less than 1% from 2008 to 2009 during the Great Recession
[...More...]

"Great Depression" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

New International Encyclopedia
The NEW INTERNATIONAL ENCYCLOPEDIA was an American encyclopedia first published in 1902 by Dodd, Mead and Company
Dodd, Mead and Company
. It descended from the International Cyclopaedia (1884) and was updated in 1906, 1914 and 1926. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Features * 3 Contributors and office editors * 4 References * 5 External links HISTORYThe New International Encyclopedia
New International Encyclopedia
was the successor of the International Cyclopaedia (1884). Initially, the International Cyclopaedia was largely a reprint of Alden's Library of Universal Knowledge, which was a reprint of the British Chambers\'s Encyclopaedia with American additions (including many biographical entries for Americans). The local Cyclopaedia was much improved by editors Harry Thurston Peck and Selim Peabody
[...More...]

"New International Encyclopedia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Disposition (harpsichord)
The DISPOSITION of a harpsichord is the set of choirs of strings it contains. This article describes various dispositions and gives the standard notation for describing them. If a harpsichord contains just one set of strings at normal concert pitch, its disposition is called 1 X 8\'. Here, the 8' means eight foot pitch , which designates normal pitch. Harpsichord