HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Spacecraft Thermal Control
In spacecraft design, the function of the thermal control system (TCS) is to keep all the spacecraft's component systems within acceptable temperature ranges during all mission phases. It must cope with the external environment, which can vary in a wide range as the spacecraft is exposed to deep space or to solar or planetary flux, and with ejecting to space the internal heat generated by the operation of the spacecraft itself. Thermal control is essential to guarantee the optimum performance and success of the mission because if a component is subjected to temperatures which are too high or too low, it could be damaged or its performance could be severely affected
[...More...]

"Spacecraft Thermal Control" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Cassini-Huygens
September 15, 201711:55:39 UTC X-band telemetry 11:55:46 UTC S-band radio science[6]Orbital parametersReference system KronocentricFlyby of Venus
Venus
( Gravity
Gravity
assist)<
[...More...]

"Cassini-Huygens" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Nomex
Nomex
Nomex
is a registered trademark for flame-resistant meta-aramid material developed in the early 1960s by DuPont
DuPont
and first marketed in 1967.[1]Contents1 Properties 2 Production 3 Applications 4 History 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksProperties[edit] Nomex
Nomex
and related aramid polymers are related to nylon, but have aromatic backbones, and hence are more rigid and more durable. Nomex an example of a meta variant of the aramids ( Kevlar
Kevlar
is a para aramid). Unlike Kevlar, Nomex
Nomex
cannot align during filament formation and has poorer strength
[...More...]

"Nomex" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

AIAA
Jim Albaugh
Jim Albaugh
(President) Sandra Magnus
Sandra Magnus
(Executive Director)Revenue$ 21 million (2009)Website www.aiaa.orgThe American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics
American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics
(AIAA) is a professional society for the field of aerospace engineering. The AIAA was founded in 1963 from the merger of two earlier societies: the American Rocket Society (ARS), founded in 1930 as the American Interplanetary Society (AIS), and the Institute of the Aerospace Sciences (IAS), founded in 1932 as the Institute of the Aeronautical Sciences. AIAA is the U.S
[...More...]

"AIAA" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Life Support System
In human spaceflight, a life support system is a group of devices that allow a human being to survive in space. US government space agency NASA,[1] and private spaceflight companies use the term environmental control and life support system or the acronym ECLSS when describing these systems for their human spaceflight missions.[2] The life support system may supply air, water and food. It must also maintain the correct body temperature, an acceptable pressure on the body and deal with the body's waste products. Shielding against harmful external influences such as radiation and micro-meteorites may also be necessary
[...More...]

"Life Support System" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

NASA
The National Aeronautics
Aeronautics
and Space Administration ( NASA
NASA
/ˈnæsə/) is an independent agency of the executive branch of the United States federal government responsible for the civilian space program, as well as aeronautics and aerospace research.[note 1] President Dwight D. Eisenhower
Dwight D. Eisenhower
established NASA
NASA
in 1958[10] with a distinctly civilian (rather than military) orientation encouraging peaceful applications in space science
[...More...]

"NASA" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Multi-layer Insulation
Multi-layer insulation, or MLI, is thermal insulation composed of multiple layers of thin sheets and is often used on spacecraft. It is one of the main items of the spacecraft thermal design, primarily intended to reduce heat loss by thermal radiation. In its basic form, it does not appreciably insulate against other thermal losses such as heat conduction or convection. It is therefore commonly used on satellites and other applications in vacuum where conduction and convection are much less significant and radiation dominates. MLI gives many satellites and other space probes the appearance of being covered with gold foil.Contents1 Function and design 2 Additional properties 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksFunction and design[edit]The golden areas are MLI blankets on the Mars Reconnaissance OrbiterThe principle behind MLI is radiation balance
[...More...]

"Multi-layer Insulation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Kapton
Kapton
Kapton
is a polyimide film developed by DuPont
DuPont
in the late 1960s[1] that remains stable across a wide range of temperatures, from −269 to +400 °C (−452 to 752 °F; 4–673 K).[2] Kapton
Kapton
is used in, among other things, flexible printed circuits (flexible electronics) and thermal blankets used on spacecraft, satellites, and various space instruments. The chemical name for Kapton
Kapton
K and HN is poly (4,4'-oxydiphenylene-pyromellitimide). It is produced from the condensation of pyromellitic dianhydride and 4,4'-oxydiphenylamine. Kapton
Kapton
synthesis is an example of the use of a dianhydride in step polymerization. The intermediate polymer, known as a "poly(amic acid)", is soluble because of strong hydrogen bonds to the polar solvents usually employed in the reaction
[...More...]

"Kapton" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Polyethylene Terephthalate
Polyethylene
Polyethylene
terephthalate (sometimes written poly(ethylene terephthalate)), commonly abbreviated PET, PETE, or the obsolete PETP or PET-P, is the most common thermoplastic polymer resin of the polyester family and is used in fibres for clothing, containers for liquids and foods, thermoforming for manufacturing, and in combination with glass fibre for engineering resins. It may also be referred to by the brand name Dacron; in Britain, Terylene;[4] or, in Russia and the former Soviet Union, Lavsan. The majority of the world's PET production is for synthetic fibres (in excess of 60%), with bottle production accounting for about 30% of global demand.[5] In the context of textile applications, PET is referred to by its common name, polyester, whereas the acronym PET is generally used in relation to packaging
[...More...]

"Polyethylene Terephthalate" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Polyvinyl Flouride
Polyvinyl fluoride (PVF) or –(CH2CHF)n– is a polymer material mainly used in the flammability-lowering coatings of airplane interiors and photovoltaic module backsheets.[2] It is also used in raincoats and metal sheeting. Polyvinyl fluoride is a thermoplastic fluoropolymer with the repeating vinyl fluoride unit: It is structurally very similar to polyvinyl chloride. PVF has low permeability for vapors, burns very slowly, and has excellent resistance to weathering and staining. It is also resistant to most chemicals, except ketones and esters. It is available as a film in a variety of colors and formulations for various end uses, and as a resin for specialty coatings
[...More...]

"Polyvinyl Flouride" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Geological Engineering
Geoprofessions is a term coined by the Geoprofessional Business Association to connote various technical disciplines that involve engineering, earth and environmental services applied to below-ground (“subsurface”), ground-surface, and ground-surface-connected conditions, structures, or formations. The principal disciplines include, as major categories:Geotechnical engineering; geology and engineering geology; geological engineering; geophysics; geophysical engineering; environmental science and environmental engineering; construction-materials engineering and testing; and other geoprofessional services.Each discipline involves specialties, many of which are recognized through professional designations that governments and societies or associations confer based upon a person’s education, training, experience, and educational accomplishments. In the United States, engineers must be licensed in the state or territory where they practice engineering
[...More...]

"Geological Engineering" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

PTFE
Polytetrafluoroethylene
Polytetrafluoroethylene
(PTFE) is a synthetic fluoropolymer of tetrafluoroethylene that has numerous applications. The best known brand name of PTFE-based formulas is Teflon
Teflon
by Chemours.[2] Chemours is a 2015 spin-off of DuPont
DuPont
Co.,[3] which discovered the compound in 1938.[2] PTFE is a fluorocarbon solid, as it is a high-molecular-weight compound consisting wholly of carbon and fluorine. PTFE is hydrophobic: neither water nor water-containing substances wet PTFE, as fluorocarbons demonstrate mitigated London dispersion forces due to the high electronegativity of fluorine. PTFE has one of the lowest coefficients of friction of any solid. PTFE is used as a non-stick coating for pans and other cookware. It is non-reactive, partly because of the strength of carbon–fluorine bonds, and so it is often used in containers and pipework for reactive and corrosive chemicals
[...More...]

"PTFE" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

European Retrievable Carrier
The European Retrievable Carrier
European Retrievable Carrier
(EURECA) was an unmanned 4.5-tonne satellite with 15 experiments.[1] It was a European Space Agency
European Space Agency
(ESA) mission and the acronym was derived from Archimedes' bathtub revelation "Eureka!". It was built by the German MBB-ERNO and had automatic material science cells as well as small telescopes for solar observation (including x-ray). It was launched 31 July 1992 by Space Shuttle
Space Shuttle
Atlantis during STS-46, and placed into an orbit at an altitude of 508 km (316 mi). EURECA was retrieved on 1 July 1993 by Space Shuttle
Space Shuttle
Endeavour during STS-57
STS-57
and returned to Earth
[...More...]

"European Retrievable Carrier" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Thermoelectric Cooling
Thermoelectric
Thermoelectric
cooling uses the Peltier effect
Peltier effect
to create a heat flux between the junction of two different types of materials. A Peltier cooler, heater, or thermoelectric heat pump is a solid-state active heat pump which transfers heat from one side of the device to the other, with consumption of electrical energy, depending on the direction of the current. Such an instrument is also called a Peltier device, Peltier heat pump, solid state refrigerator, or thermoelectric cooler (TEC). It can be used either for heating or for cooling,[1] although in practice the main application is cooling. It can also be used as a temperature controller that either heats or cools.[2] This technology is far less commonly applied to refrigeration than vapor-compression refrigeration is
[...More...]

"Thermoelectric Cooling" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Louver
A louver (American English) or louvre (British English) is a window blind or shutter with horizontal slats that are angled to admit light and air, but to keep out rain and direct sunshine. The angle of the slats may be adjustable, usually in blinds and windows, or fixed.[1]Contents1 History 2 Construction 3 Jalousies 4 Use4.1 In architecture 4.2 In infrastructure 4.3 In transportation 4.4 Examples5 See also 6 ReferencesHistory[edit] Louvers originated in the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
as lantern-like constructions in wood that were fitted on top of roof holes in large kitchens to allow ventilation while keeping out rain and snow. They were originally rather crude constructions consisting merely of a barrel
[...More...]

"Louver" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Loop Heat Pipe
A loop heat pipe (LHP) is a two-phase heat transfer device that uses capillary action to remove heat from a source and passively move it to a condenser or radiator. LHPs are similar to heat pipes but have the advantage of being able to provide reliable operation over long distance and the ability to operate against gravity
[...More...]

"Loop Heat Pipe" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.