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Soviet Communism
The ideology of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union
Communist Party of the Soviet Union
(CPSU) was Marxism–Leninism, an ideology of centralised, planned economy and a vanguardist one-party state, which was supposed to be the dictatorship of the proletariat. The Soviet Union's ideological commitment to achieving communism included the development socialism in one country and peaceful coexistence with capitalist countries while engaging in anti-imperialism to defend the international proletariat, combat capitalism and promote the goals of communism. The state ideology of the Soviet Union—and thus Marxism–Leninism—derived and developed from the theories, policies and political praxis of Vladimir Lenin
Vladimir Lenin
and Joseph Stalin
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Politics Of The Soviet Union
The political system of the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
was characterized by the superior role of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union
Communist Party of the Soviet Union
(CPSU), the only party permitted by the Constitution. For inf
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Law Of The Soviet Union
The Law of the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
was the law as it developed in the Soviet Union (USSR) following the October Revolution
October Revolution
of 1917. Modified versions of the Soviet legal system operated in many Communist states following the Second World War—including Mongolia, the People's Republic of China, the Warsaw Pact
Warsaw Pact
countries of eastern Europe, Cuba and Vietnam.Contents1 Soviet concept of law 2 Constitutional law 3 Court structure3.1 Criminal cases 3.2 Civil court4 Human rights 5 See also 6 Notes 7 BibliographySoviet concept of law[edit] Soviet law was rooted in pre-revolutionary Russian law and Marxism-Leninism. Pre-revolutionary influences included Byzantine law, Mongol law, Russian Orthodox Canon law, and Western law. Western law was mostly absent until the judicial reform of Alexander II in 1864, five decades before the revolution
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1977 Soviet Constitution
At the 7th (Special) Session of the Supreme Soviet of the Soviet Union Ninth Convocation on October 7, 1977, the third and last Soviet Constitution, also known as the Brezhnev Constitution, was unanimously adopted. The official name of the Constitution
Constitution
was "Constitution (Fundamental Law) of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics" (Russian: Конститу́ция (Основно́й Зако́н) Сою́за Сове́тских Социалисти́ческих Респу́блик). The preamble stated that "the aims of the dictatorship of the proletariat having been fulfilled, the Soviet state has become the state of the whole people." Compared with previous constitutions, the Brezhnev Constitution
Constitution
extended the bounds of constitutional regulation of society
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Government Of The Soviet Union
The Government of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (Russian: Правительство СССР, Pravitel'stvo SSSR) was the main body of the executive branch of government in the Soviet Union. Its head of government was the officeholder generally known in the West as the Premier of the Soviet Union. However, Soviet Union
Soviet Union
was an one-party state governed by the Communist Party of the Soviet Union (CPSU), which had its power entrenched in the Constitution of the Soviet Union. The Politburo of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union was de facto the highest policy-making organ in the country and drafted government policy, with the Government being subordinate to the Party.[1] The members of the Soviet Government—people's commissars, ministers, and heads of state committees—were recommended by the Premier and appointed by the Presidium of the Supreme Soviet
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Ministries Of The Soviet Union
The Ministries of the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
(Russian: Министерства СССР) were the government ministries of the Soviet Union. After the Russian Revolution
Russian Revolution
of 1917 the previous bureaucratic apparatus of bourgeois ministers was replaced by People’s Commissariats (Russian: народных комиссариатов; Narkom), staffed by new employees drawn from workers and peasants.[1] On 15 March 1946 the people’s commissariats were transformed into ministries
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State Committee Of The Soviet Union
A USSR State Committee was a central government body within the Government of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics
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Executive Officer Of The Soviet Union
The Administrator of Affairs of the Soviet Union, or Secretary to the Premier, was a high-standing officer within the Soviet Government whose main task was to co-sign, with the Premier of the Soviet Union, decrees and resolutions made by either the Council of People's Commissars (1922–1946), Council of Ministers (1946–1991) or the Cabinet of Ministers (1991). The government apparatus prepared items of policy, which the office holder would check systematically against decrees of the Party-Government. This function consisted of several departments and other structural units
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Premier Of The Soviet Union
The office of Premier of the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
(Russian: Глава Правительства СССР) was synonymous with head of government of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR). Twelve individuals became premier over the time span of the office. Two of the twelve premiers died in office of natural causes (Vladimir Lenin and Joseph Stalin), three resigned (Alexei Kosygin, Nikolai Tikhonov and Ivan Silayev), and three held the offices of party leader and premier simultaneously (Lenin, Stalin and Nikita Khrushchev). The first premier was Lenin, who was inaugurated in 1922 after the Treaty on the Creation of the USSR. Ivan Silayev
Ivan Silayev
spent the shortest time in office at 126 days in 1991
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List Of Governments Of The Soviet Union
The following is a list of governments of the Soviet Union.# Government Term Time in office1 Lenin I 1923–1924 7002211000000000000♠211 days2 Rykov I 1924–1930 7003251200000000000♠6 years, 320 days3 Molotov I 1930–1941 7003379200000000000♠10 years, 139 days4 Stalin I 1941–1946 7003177300000000000♠4 years, 312 days5 Stalin II 1946–1953 7003254800000000000♠6 years, 356 days6 Malenkov I 1953–1954 7002417000000000000♠1 year, 52 days7 Malenkov II 1954–1955 7002287000000000000♠287 days8 Bulganin I 1955–1958 7003114300000000000♠3 years, 47 days9 Khrushchev I 1958–1962 7003148500000000000♠4 years, 24 days10 Khrushchev II 1962–1964 7002904000000000000♠2 years, 173 days11 Kosygin I 1964–1966 7002840000000000000♠2 years, 110 days12 Kosygin II 1966–1970 700314410000
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Council Of People's Commissars
The Council of People's Commissars
Council of People's Commissars
(Russian: Совет народных комиссаров or Совнарком, translit. Soviet narodnykh kommissarov or Sovnarkom, also as generic SNK) was a government institution formed shortly after the October Revolution
October Revolution
in 1917. Created in the Russian Republic, the council laid foundations in restructuring the country to form the Soviet Union. It evolved to become the highest government authority of executive power in the government of the Soviet Union
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Council Of Ministers Of The Soviet Union
The Council of Ministers of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (Russian: Сове́т мини́стров СССР, tr. Sovet Ministrov SSSR, IPA: [sɐˈvʲɛt mʲɪˈnʲistrəf ɛsɛsɛˈsɛr]; sometimes abbreviated to Sovmin or referred to as the Soviet of Ministers), was the de jure government comprising the highest executive and administrative body of the Soviet Union from 1946 until 1991. In 1946 the Council of People's Commissars was transformed into the Council of Ministers, with People's Commissariats turned into Ministries. The council issued declarations and instructions based on and in accordance with applicable laws, which had obligatory jurisdictional power over the territories of all republics within the Union. However, the most important state issues were handled through joint declarations with the Central Committee of the Communist Party of Soviet Union (CPSU), which was de facto more powerful than the Council of Ministers
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Cabinet Of Ministers (Soviet Union)
Cabinet of Ministers of the USSR (Russian: Кабинет Министров СССР) functioned as the administrative, executive body and the government after the Council of Ministers was dissolved. It consisted of the Prime Minister, his deputies and the ministers. The Cabinet of Ministers was to be the responsibility of the President of the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
and the Supreme Soviet. All newly formed Cabinets were to submit their program to the Supreme Soviet for approval.This Soviet Union–related article is a stub
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Supreme Court Of The Soviet Union
The Supreme Court of the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
(Russian: Верховный Суд СССР) was the highest court of the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
during its existence
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1924 Soviet Constitution
The 1924 Soviet Constitution
Constitution
legitimated the December 1922 Treaty on the Creation of the USSR between the Russian SFSR, the Ukrainian SSR, the Byelorussian SSR, and the Transcaucasian SFSR to form the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. In essence, it was but an expansion of the Treaty, as most of the key points were already outlined there
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People's Court (Soviet Union)
People's court in the late Soviet Union
Soviet Union
is a court of first instance which handled the majority of civil and criminal offenses, as well as certain administrative law offenses. The people's court handled cases by a collegium consisted of a people's judge and two people's assessors. The people's assessors had duties similar to jurors, but decided both any objections and the verdict along with the judge, unlike in most jury systems. In early Soviet Russia and Soviet Union
Soviet Union
the term "people's court" was used in reference to any court in the new Soviet legal system which replaced the legal system of the Russian Empire. At these times there were several levels of courts, according to the administrative division of the country: local, okrug, and oblast people's courts.[1] See also[edit]Procurator General of the USSR Supreme Court of the USSR Ministry of Justice of the USSRReferences[edit]^ "Decree about the Court No
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