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Soviet Invasion Of Poland
The Soviet invasion of Poland
Soviet invasion of Poland
was a Soviet military operation that started without a formal declaration of war on 17 September 1939. On that morning, 16 days after Germany invaded Poland from the west, the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
invaded Poland from the east. Subsequent military operations lasted for the following 20 days and ended on 6 October 1939 with the two-way division and annexation of the entire territory of the Second Polish Republic
Second Polish Republic
by both Germany and the Soviet Union.[7] The joint German- Soviet invasion of Poland
Soviet invasion of Poland
was secretly agreed to following the signing of the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact
Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact
on 23 August 1939.[8] The Red Army, which vastly outnumbered the Polish defenders, achieved its targets by using strategic and tactical deception
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Marshal Of Poland
Marshal
Marshal
of Poland
Poland
(Marszałek Polski) is the highest rank in the Polish Army. It has been granted to only six officers
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Edward Rydz-Śmigły
Marshal Edward Rydz-Śmigły [ˈɛdvard ˈrɨdz ˈɕmiɡwɨ] ( listen) (11 March 1886 – 2 December 1941; nom de guerre Śmigły, Tarłowski, Adam Zawisza), also called Edward Śmigły-Rydz, was a Polish politician, statesman, Marshal of Poland
Marshal of Poland
and Commander-in-Chief
Commander-in-Chief
of Poland's armed forces, as well as painter and poet. During the interwar period, he was an exceptionally admired public figure in Poland
Poland
and was regarded as a hero for his exemplary record as an army commander in the Polish Legions of World War I
World War I
and the ensuing Polish-Soviet War
Polish-Soviet War
of 1920
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Kliment Voroshilov
Kliment Yefremovich Voroshilov (Russian:  Климе́нт Ефре́мович Вороши́лов​ (help·info), Kliment Jefremovič Vorošilov; Ukrainian: Климент Охрімович Ворошилов, Klyment Okhrimovyč Vorošylov), popularly known as Klim Voroshilov (Russian: Клим Вороши́лов, Klim Vorošilov) (4 February 1881[1] – 2 December 1969), was a prominent Soviet military officer and politician during the Stalin era
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Polish Army
The Land Forces (Wojska Lądowe) are a military branch of the Armed Forces of the Republic of Poland. They currently contain some 65,000 active personnel and form many components of European Union
European Union
and NATO deployments around the world
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Border Protection Corps
The Border Protection Corps
Border Protection Corps
(Polish: Korpus Ochrony Pogranicza, KOP) was a Polish military formation that was created in 1924 to defend the country's eastern borders against armed Soviet incursions and local bandits. Other borders were under the jurisdiction of a separate, regular Border Guard state security agency. Though the corps was part of the Polish Army, it was commanded directly by the Ministry of Internal Affairs rather than the Ministry of National Defence. It consisted of elite soldiers from all parts of Poland. Initially KOP comprised 6 brigades and 5 regiments, each guarding part of the borders with the Soviet Union
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Battle Of Hel
The Battle of Hel
Battle of Hel
was one of the longest battles of the Invasion of Poland
Poland
during World War II. The Hel Peninsula, together with the town of Hel, was the pocket of Polish Army
Polish Army
resistance that held out the longest against the German invasion. Approximately 2,800 soldiers of the Fortified Region Hel unit (Helski Rejon Umocniony), part of the Coastal Defence Group (Grupa Obrony Wybrzeża) under [Kapitan Stanislaw Zwartynski], defended the area against overwhelming odds from 9 September until 2 October 1939, when they surrendered.[1]Contents1 Prelude 2 Battle 3 Aftermath 4 Notes 5 ReferencesPrelude[edit] There was a Polish military
Polish military
port in Hel from 1928, and the Polish military had been in control of the northern part of the peninsula since the 1920s
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Battle Of Węgierska Górka
The Battle of Węgierska Górka
Węgierska Górka
was a two-day-long defence of a Polish fortified area in south of Silesia
Silesia
during the opening stages of the Invasion of Poland
Poland
of 1939. Although the Polish position was not completed and only five bunkers were manned, the line was defended for two days and nights against superior German forces of the German 7th Infantry Division. One of the bunkers was successfully evacuated by the Polish 1st Mountain Brigade, but the others lacked radio receivers and did not receive the order to retreat
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Battle Of Tuchola Forest
150 killed 700 wounded 10,000 killed wounded or capturedv t eInvasion of PolandBattle of the BorderChojnice Krojanty Lasy Królewskie Mokra Pszczyna Grudziądz Mława Jordanów Fraustadt Węgierska Górka Tuchola Forest Częstochowa Mikołów Bukowiec Slovak invasionBaltic coastWesterplatte Danzig Danzig Bay Worek Plan Gdynia Hel Kępa Oksywska4–10 SeptemberTomaszów Mazowiecki Wizna Łódź Borowa Góra Piotrków Różan Pułtusk Radom Łomża Barak Wola CyrusowaNorthern FrontSiege of Warsaw Bzura Kałuszyn Węgrów Wilno Modlin Kobryń Brześć 2nd Tomaszów Lubelski Wólka Węglowa Kampinos Forest Krasnystaw Łomianki Krasnobród KockSouthern FrontPrzemyśl Jarosław 1st Tomaszów Lubelski Jaworów Janów Forest Cześniki LwówSoviet invasion of PolandSarny Wilno Husynne Grodno Władypol Szack Wytyczno Parczew, Jabłoń and MilanówThe Battle of
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Battle Of Mikołów
The Battle of Mikołów
Mikołów
(Polish: Bitwa pod Mikolowem, Bitwa wyrska) refers to the border engement on September 1 and 2, 1939, that took place in the area of the town of Mikołów, which is located in the Polish part of Upper Silesia, during the early stages of the Invasion of Poland
Poland
in the Second World War.Contents1 Introduction 2 September 1, 1939 3 September 2, 1939 4 Withdrawal 5 SourcesIntroduction[edit]Positions of Polish and German forces before the battle. Map by Lonio17The battle began with attacks by aircraft of the German 4th Air Fleet (Luftflotte), which bombed several areas, including the airfield in Katowice. Soon afterwards, early in the morning on September 1, 1939, units of the Wehrmacht
Wehrmacht
crossed the Polish-German border
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Slovak Invasion Of Poland
37 dead 114 wounded 11 missing 2 aircraft destroyed Heavy casualties 1 aircraft shot downv t eInvasion of PolandBattle of the BorderChojnice Krojanty Lasy Królewskie Mokra Pszczyna Grudziądz Mława Jordanów Fraustadt Węgierska Górka Tuchola Forest Częstochowa Mikołów Bukowiec Slovak invasionBaltic coastWesterplatte Danzig Danzig Bay Worek Plan Gdynia Hel Kępa Oksywska4–10 SeptemberTomaszów Mazowiecki Wizna Łódź Borowa Góra Piotrków Różan Pułtusk Radom Łomża Barak Wola CyrusowaNorthern FrontSiege of Warsaw Bzura Kałuszyn Węgrów Wilno Modlin Kobryń Brześć 2nd Tomaszów Lubelski Wólka Węglowa Kampinos Forest Krasnystaw Łomianki Krasnobród KockSouthern FrontPrzemyśl Jarosław 1st Tomaszów Lubelski Jaworów Janów Forest Cześniki LwówSoviet invasion of PolandSarny Wilno Husynne Grodno Władypol Szack Wytyczno Parczew, Jabłoń and MilanówDisputed border areas with Poland
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Battle Of Westerplatte
Friedrich-Georg Eberhardt Gustav Kleikamp Wilhelm Henningsen † Walter SchugStrength209 soldiers ~3,400 soldiers and policemen 1 pre-dreadnought 2 torpedo boats 60 dive bombersCasualties and losses15–20 dead 53 wounded Remainder captured 300-400 dead or woundedv t eInvasion of PolandBattle of the BorderChojnice Krojanty Lasy Królewskie Mokra Pszczyna Grudziądz Mława Jordanów Fraustadt Węgierska Górka Tuchola Forest Częstochowa Mikołów Bukowiec Slovak invasionBaltic coastWesterplatte Danzig Danzig Bay Worek Plan Gdynia Hel Kępa Oksywska4–10 SeptemberTomaszów Mazowiecki Wizna Łódź Borowa Góra Piotrków Różan Pułtusk Radom Łomża Barak Wola CyrusowaNorthern FrontSiege of Warsaw Bzura Kałuszyn Węgrów Wilno Modlin Kobryń Brześć 2nd Tomaszów Lubelski Wólka Węglowa Kampinos Forest Krasnystaw Łomianki Krasnobród KockSouthern FrontPrzemyśl
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Defence Of The Polish Post Office In Danzig
The Defence of the Polish Post Office in Danzig
Polish Post Office in Danzig
(Gdańsk) was one of the first acts of World War II
World War II
in Europe, as part of the Invasion of Poland.[1]:39,42 On September 1, 1939, Polish personnel defended the building for some 15 hours against assaults by the SS Heimwehr Danzig
SS Heimwehr Danzig
(SS Danzig Home Defense), local SA formations and special units of Danzig police
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Battle Of Danzig Bay
Strategic German victoryCancellation of Operation RurkaBelligerents Germany  PolandCommanders and leadersUnknown Stefan Kwiatkowski † Viktor LomidzeStrength33 Junkers Ju 87B 7 minelayers 2 gunboats AA units at Hel PeninsulaCasualties and losses7-10 aircraft destroyed or damaged 52 killed and wounded 2 minelayers damagedv t eInvasion of PolandBattle of the BorderChojnice Krojanty Lasy Królewskie Mokra Pszczyna Grudziądz Mława Jordanów Fraustadt Węgierska Górka Tuchola Forest Częstochowa Mikołów Bukowiec Slovak invasionBaltic coastWesterplatte Danzig Danzig Bay Worek Plan Gdynia Hel Kępa Oksywska4–10 SeptemberTomaszów Mazowiecki Wizna Łódź Borowa Góra Piotrków Różan Pułtusk Radom Łomża Barak Wola CyrusowaNorthern FrontSiege of Warsaw Bzura Kałuszyn Węgrów Wilno Modlin Kobryń Brześć 2nd Tomaszów Lubelski Wólk
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Worek Plan
The Worek Plan
Worek Plan
(or Operation Worek, Polish: Plan Worek, literally Plan Sack) was an operation of the Polish Navy
Polish Navy
in the first days of World War II, in which its five submarines formed a screen in order to prevent German naval forces from carrying out landings on the Polish coast, and to attack enemy ships bombarding Polish coastal fortifications, in particular the base on the Hel Peninsula. The operation came to naught, as the Germans did not have any plans for naval landings. It caused the submarines to operate in a confined area near the shore in shallow waters, making them vulnerable to strong enemy anti-submarine forces. As a result, despite making a number of attempts, the submarines were unable to directly sink any enemy ships during the operation, although a mine placed by the Żbik did sink a German minesweeper
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Battle Of Gdynia
Battle of Gdynia
Gdynia
was one of the major battles in northern Poland during the Invasion of Poland
Poland
of 1939. The Germans' main push towards Gdynia
Gdynia
began on 8 September and they captured Gdynia
Gdynia
less than a week later on 14 September.Contents1 Before the battle 2 Battle 3 Quote 4 ReferencesBefore the battle[edit] Gdynia
Gdynia
is a major civilian and military port on the Baltic Sea, and was an important industrial centre of the Second Polish Republic. Its defence was one of the key elements in the Polish defence plan
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