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Southern Poverty Law Center
The Southern Poverty Law Center
Southern Poverty Law Center
(SPLC) is an American nonprofit legal advocacy organization specializing in civil rights and public interest litigation. Based in Montgomery, Alabama, it is noted for its successful legal cases against white supremacist groups, its classification of hate groups and other extremist organizations, and for promoting tolerance education programs.[3][4][5] SPLC was founded by Morris Dees
Morris Dees
and Joseph J. Levin Jr. in 1971 as a civil rights law firm in Montgomery.[6] Civil rights
Civil rights
leader Julian Bond served as president of the board between 1971 and 1979.[7] In 1979, the SPLC began a litigation strategy of filing civil suits for monetary damages on behalf of the victims of violence from the Ku Klux Klan and other white supremacist groups, with all damages recovered given to the victims or donated to other organizations
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National Geographic Channel
National Geographic
National Geographic
(formerly National Geographic
National Geographic
Channel and also commercially abbreviated and trademarked as Nat Geo or Nat Geo TV) is an American digital cable and satellite television network that is owned by National Geographic
National Geographic
Partners, majority-owned by 21st Century Fox (sale pending to The Walt Disney Company) with the remainder owned by the National Geographic
National Geographic
Society. The flagship channel airs non-fiction television programs produced by National Geographic
National Geographic
and other production companies. Like History and Discovery Channel, the channel features documentaries with factual content involving nature, science, culture, and history, plus some reality and pseudo-scientific entertainment programming
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Civil Law (common Law)
Civil law is a branch of the law.[1] In common law countries such as England, Wales, Pakistan and the United States, the term refers to non-criminal law.[1][2] The law relating to civil wrongs and quasi-contracts is part of the civil law.[3] The law of property is embraced by civil law.[4] Civil law can, like criminal law, be divided into substantive law and procedural law.[5] The rights and duties of individuals amongst themselves is the primary concern of civil law.[6] It is often suggested that civil proceedings are taken for the purpose of obtaining compensation for injury, and may thus be distinguished from criminal proceedings, whose purpose is to inflict punishment. However, exemplary or punitive damages may be awarded in civil proceedings
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Death Penalty
Capital punishment, also known as the death penalty, is a government-sanctioned practice whereby a person is put to death by the state as a punishment for a crime. The sentence that someone be punished in such a manner is referred to as a death sentence, whereas the act of carrying out the sentence is known as an execution. Crimes that are punishable by death are known as capital crimes or capital offences, and they commonly include offences such as murder, treason, espionage, war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide. Etymologically, the term capital (lit
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Board Of Directors
A board of directors is a recognized group of people who jointly oversee the activities of an organization, which can be either a for-profit business, nonprofit organization, or a government agency. Such a board's powers, duties, and responsibilities are determined by government regulations (including the jurisdiction's corporations law) and the organization's own constitution and bylaws. These authorities may specify the number of members of the board, how they are to be chosen, and how often they are to meet. In an organization with voting members, the board is accountable to, and might be subordinate to, the organization's full membership, which usually vote for the members of the board. In a stock corporation, non-executive directors are voted for by the shareholders and the board is the highest authority in the management of the corporation. The board of directors appoints the chief executive officer of the corporation and sets out the overall strategic direction
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Consent Order
A consent decree is an agreement or settlement that resolves a dispute between two parties without admission of guilt (in a criminal case) or liability (in a civil case), and most often refers to such a type of settlement in the United States.[1][2] The plaintiff and the defendant ask the court to enter into their agreement, and the court maintains supervision over the implementation of the decree in monetary exchanges or restructured interactions between parties.[2][3][4][5] It is similar to and sometimes referred to as an antitrust decree, stipulated judgment, settlement agreements, or consent judgment.[6][7][5] Consent decrees are frequently used by federal courts to ensure that businesses and industries adhere to regulatory laws in areas such as antitrust law, employment discrimination, and environmental regulation.[3][8][9]Contents1 Legal process 2 History2.1 Federal Rules of Civil and Criminal Procedure 2.2 Precedents3 Most frequent uses3.1 Anti
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Taxpayer Identification Number
A Taxpayer Identification Number (TIN) is an identifying number used for tax purposes in the United States. It is also known as a Tax Identification Number or Federal Taxpayer Identification Number. A TIN may be assigned by the Social Security Administration
Social Security Administration
or by the Internal Revenue Service
Internal Revenue Service
(IRS). Section 6109(a) of the Internal Revenue Code
Internal Revenue Code
provides (in part) that "When required by regulations prescribed by the Secretary [of the Treasury or his delegate] [ . .
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Firebombing
Firebombing
Firebombing
is a bombing technique designed to damage a target, generally an urban area, through the use of fire, caused by incendiary devices, rather than from the blast effect of large bombs. In popular usage, any act which an incendiary device is used to initiate a fire is often described as a "firebombing". This article is concerned with aerial incendiary bombing as a military tactic; for non-military (almost always criminal) acts, see arson. Although simple incendiary bombs have been used to destroy buildings since the start of gunpowder warfare, World War I
World War I
saw the first use of strategic bombing from the air to damage the morale and economy of the enemy, such as the German Zeppelin
Zeppelin
air raids conducted on London during the Great War. The Chinese wartime capital of Chongqing was firebombed by the Imperial Japanese starting in early 1939
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United States District Court For The Eastern District Of North Carolina
The United States District Court
United States District Court
for the Eastern District of North Carolina (in case citations, E.D.N.C.) is the United States District Court that serves the eastern 44 counties in North Carolina. Appeals from the Eastern District of North Carolina
North Carolina
are taken to the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit (except for patent claims and claims against the U.S. government under the Tucker Act, which are appealed to the Federal Circuit).Contents1 Jurisdiction and offices 2 History 3 Current judges 4 Vacancies and pending nominations 5 Former judges 6 Chief judges 7 Succession of seats 8 U.S. Attorneys for the Eastern District 9 See also 10 References 11 External linksJurisdiction and offices[edit] The District has three staffed offices and holds court in six cities: Elizabeth City, Fayetteville, Greenville, New Bern, Raleigh, and Wilmington. Its main office is in Raleigh
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United States District Court For The Middle District Of Alabama
The United States District Court for the Middle District of Alabama (in case citations, M.D. Ala.) is a federal court in the Eleventh Circuit (except for patent claims and claims against the U.S. government under the Tucker Act, which are appealed to the Federal Circuit). The District was established on February 6, 1839 with the addition of the Middle district. The circuit court itself was established on June 22, 1874.[1] The United States Attorney's Office for the Middle District of Alabama represents the United States in civil and criminal litigation in the court. The current United States Attorney
United States Attorney
is Louis V
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Church And State
The separation of church and state is a philosophic and jurisprudential concept for defining political distance in the relationship between religious organizations and the nation state. Conceptually, the term refers to the creation of a secular state (with or without legally explicit church–state separation) and to disestablishment, the changing of an existing, formal relationship between the church and the state.[1] In a society, the degree of political separation between the church and the civil state are determined by the legal structures and prevalent legal views that define the proper relationship between organized religion and the state. The arm's length principle proposes a relationship wherein the two political entities interact as organizations independent of the authority of the other
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Texas Emergency Reserve
The Texas Emergency Reserve (TER) was a militia group which operated in Texas, and at its peak had close to 2,500 members. In 1981, a U.S. District Court judge ordered the TER to close its military training camp based on a Texas law that forbade private armies in the state.[1] The Reserve had ties with the Ku Klux Klan, and with one of the Klan's prominent members, Louis Beam.[1][2] The Reserve is most famous for an incident which took place in Seabrook, Texas on March 15, 1981, in which armed members of the organization held a demonstration on a boat in the waters around the city in an attempt to intimidate local Vietnamese fishermen who had been settled there by the government.[2] In the course of the demonstration, an effigy of a Vietnamese fisherman was hung from the stern of the ship and threatening gestures were made to the onlooking Vietnamese fishermen and their families.[2] References[edit]^ a b Gitlin, Marty (2009). The Ku Klux Klan: A Guide to an American Subculture
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Shrimp Fishery
The shrimp fishery is a major global industry, with more than 3.4 million tons caught per year, chiefly in Asia
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Galveston Bay
Galveston
Galveston
Bay (/ˈɡælvɪstən/ GAL-vis-tən) is the seventh-largest[1] estuary in the United States, located along the upper coast of Texas. It is connected to the Gulf of Mexico
Gulf of Mexico
and is surrounded by sub-tropic marshes and prairies on the mainland.[2] The water in the bay is a complex mixture of sea water and fresh water which supports a wide variety of marine life
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Cross Burning
Cross
Cross
burning or cross lighting is a practice widely associated with the Ku Klux Klan, although the historical practice long predates the Klan's inception–as far back as Peter of Bruys
Peter of Bruys
(1117–1131), who burned crosses in protest of the veneration of crosses. In the early 20th century, the Klan burned crosses on hillsides or near the homes of those they wished to intimidate.Contents1 Scottish origins 2 The Birth of a Nation 3 Sign of the Ku Klux Klan 4 Legal position in the United States 5 See also 6 ReferencesScottish origins[edit] In Scotland, the fiery cross, known as the Crann Tara, was used as a declaration of war.[1] The sight of it commanded all clan members to rally to the defense of the area. On other occasions, a small burning cross would be carried from town to town
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U.S. District Court
House of RepresentativesSpeaker Paul Ryan
Paul Ryan
(R)Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R)Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi
Nancy Pelosi
(D)Co
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