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South China Morning Post
The South China
China
Morning Post (also known as SCMP or The Post), with its Sunday edition, the Sunday Morning Post, is a Hong Kong English-language newspaper and Hong Kong's newspaper of record.[1] The journal was founded by Australian-born revolutionary Tse Tsan-tai
Tse Tsan-tai
and British journalist Alfred Cunningham
Alfred Cunningham
(formerly with China
China
Mail, Hong Kong Daily Press and New York Sun) in 1903. The first edition of the paper was published on 6 November 1903
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Rupert Murdoch
Keith Rupert Murdoch, AC KCSG (/ˈmɜːrdɒk/;[3] born 11 March 1931) is an Australian-born American media mogul.[4] Murdoch's father, Sir Keith Murdoch, was a reporter and editor who became a senior executive of The Herald and Weekly Times
The Herald and Weekly Times
publishing company, covering all Australian states except New South Wales.[5] After his father's death in 1952, Murdoch declined to join his late father's registered public company and created his own private company, News Limited. In the 1950s and 1960s, Murdoch acquired a number of newspapers in Australia
Australia
and New Zealand before expanding into the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
in 1969, taking over the News of the World, followed closely by The Sun. In 1974, Murdoch moved to New York City, to expand into the U.S. market; however, he retained interests in Australia
Australia
and Britain
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Archive
An archive is an accumulation of historical records or the physical place they are located.[1] Archives contain primary source documents that have accumulated over the course of an individual or organization's lifetime, and are kept to show the function of that person or organization. Professional archivists and historians generally understand archives to be records that have been naturally and necessarily generated as a product of regular legal, commercial, administrative, or social activities. They have been metaphorically defined as "the secretions of an organism",[2] and are distinguished from documents that have been consciously written or created to communicate a particular message to posterity. In general, archives consist of records that have been selected for permanent or long-term preservation on grounds of their enduring cultural, historical, or evidentiary value
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Utopia (typeface)
Utopia is the name of a transitional serif typeface designed by Robert Slimbach and released by Adobe Systems in 1989.[1]Contents1 Design 2 Free software release2.1 Initial donation to the X Consortium3 Derived typefaces 4 Lawsuit 5 References 6 External linksDesign[edit] Utopia qualifies as a transitional serif typeface: one based on 18th- and early-19th-century ideals of classical design. Adobe's release notes cite Baskerville and Walbaum as influences, and Adobe's Sumner Stone has also compared it to Hermann Zapf's Melior as similar.[2][3] It was one of the first typefaces to be part of Adobe's Originals programme, designed to feature a large range of styles for professional use. With a reasonably solid design, Utopia was sometimes used by newspapers. Current versions of the typeface are released in the OpenType format and include features such as ligatures and small capitals
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Font
In metal typesetting, a font was a particular size, weight and style of a typeface. Each font was a matched set of type, one piece (called a "sort") for each glyph, and a typeface consisting of a range of fonts that shared an overall design. In modern usage, with the advent of digital typography, "font" is frequently synonymous with "typeface". Each style is in a separate "font file"—for instance, the typeface "Bulmer" may include the fonts "Bulmer roman", "Bulmer italic", "Bulmer bold" and "Bulmer extended"—but the term "font" might be applied either to one of these alone or to the whole typeface. In both traditional typesetting and modern usage, the word "font" refers to the delivery mechanism of the typeface design. In traditional typesetting, the font would be made from metal or wood. Today, the font is a digital file.Play mediaIsraeli typographer Henri Friedlaender
Henri Friedlaender
examines Hadassah Hebrew typeface sketches
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Washington Post
The Washington Post
The Washington Post
is an American daily newspaper. Published in Washington, D.C., it was founded on December 6, 1877.[7] Located in the capital city of the United States, the newspaper has a particular emphasis on national politics. The newspaper's slogan states, "Democracy dies in darkness". Daily editions are printed for the District of Columbia, Maryland, and Virginia. It is published as a broadsheet. The newspaper has won 47 Pulitzer Prizes. This includes six separate Pulitzers awarded in 2008, second only to The New York Times' seven awards in 2002 for the highest number ever awarded to a single newspaper in one year.[8] Post journalists have also received 18 Nieman Fellowships and 368 White House
White House
News Photographers Association awards
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Apple IPad
iPad (/ˈaɪpæd/ EYE-pad) is a line of tablet computers designed, developed and marketed by Apple Inc., which run the iOS mobile operating system. The first iPad was released on April 3, 2010; the most recent iPad models are the iPad (2018), released on March 27, 2018, the 10.5-inch (270 mm) and 12.9-inch (330 mm) 2G iPad Pro released on June 13, 2017. The user interface is built around the device's multi-touch screen, including a virtual keyboard. All iPads can connect via Wi-Fi; some models also have cellular connectivity. As of January 2015, Apple had sold more than 250 million iPads[6], though sales peaked in 2013[17][18] and it is now the second-most popular kind of tablet computer, by sales, after Android-based types.[19] An iPad can shoot video, take photos, play music, and perform Internet functions such as web-browsing and emailing
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Hong Kong Stock Exchange
The Stock Exchange of Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Limited, abb. SEHK, is Asia's third-largest stock exchange in terms of market capitalization behind the Tokyo Stock Exchange
Tokyo Stock Exchange
and Shanghai Stock Exchange, and the sixth largest in the world before Euronext. As of 31 October 2016, SEHK had 1,955 listed companies, 989 of which are from mainland China
China
(Red chip, H share and P chip), 856 from Hong Kong
Hong Kong
and 110 from other countries and region (e.g
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Qing Dynasty
Tael
Tael
(liǎng)Preceded by Succeeded byLater JinShunSouthern MingDzungarRepublic of ChinaMongoliaThe Qing dynasty, also known as the Qing Empire, officially the Great Qing (English: /tʃɪŋ/), was the last imperial dynasty of China, established in 1636 and ruling China from 1644 to 1912. It was preceded by the Ming dynasty
Ming dynasty
and succeeded by the Republic of China. The Qing multi-cultural empire lasted almost three centuries and formed the territorial base for the modern Chinese state. It was the fourth largest empire in world history. The dynasty was founded by the Jurchen Aisin Gioro
Aisin Gioro
clan in Manchuria. In the late sixteenth century, Nurhaci, originally a Ming vassal, began organizing "Banners", military-social units that included Jurchen, Han Chinese, and Mongol elements
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Paywall
A paywall is a method of restricting access to Internet content via a paid subscription.[1][2] Beginning in the mid-2010s, newspapers started implementing paywalls on their websites as a way to increase revenue after years of decline in paid print readership and advertising revenue.[3] In academics, research papers are often subject to a paywall and are available via academic libraries that subscribe.[4][5] Paywalls have also been used as a way of increasing the number of print subscribers; for example, some newspapers offer access to online content plus delivery of a Sunday print edition at a lower price than online access alone.[6] Newspaper websites such as that of The Boston Globe and The New York Times
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Hong Kong Basic Law
The Basic Law of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region
Hong Kong Special Administrative Region
of the People's Republic of China
People's Republic of China
is the constitutional document of the Hong Kong Special
Special
Administrative Region
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The Sun (New York)
The Sun was a New York newspaper that was published from 1833 until 1950. It was considered a serious paper, like the city's two more successful broadsheets, The New York Times
The New York Times
and the New York Herald Tribune. The Sun was the most politically conservative of the three.Contents1 History 2 Milestones 3 Legacy 4 Notable journalists of The Sun 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksHistory[edit] In New York, The Sun began publication September 3, 1833, as a morning newspaper edited by Benjamin Day (1810-1889), with the slogan "It Shines for All".[2] It only cost one penny (equivalent to 25¢ in 2017), was easy to carry, and its illustrations and crime reporting were popular with working-class readers
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Daily Press (Hong Kong)
The Daily Press (Traditional Chinese: 每日雜報, also 孖剌報, 孖剌西報 and 孖剌沙西報) was an English-language newspaper in Hong Kong, published from 1857 for about 80 years
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Tiananmen Papers
The Tiananmen Papers was first published in English in January 2001 by PublicAffairs. The extended Chinese version of this book was published in April that same year under the title 中國六四真相 (Pinyin: Zhōngguó Liùsì Zhēnxiàng, translated as June Fourth: The True Story) by Mirror Books in Hong Kong. The book is presented as a compilation of selected secret Chinese official documents relating to the Tiananmen Square protests of 1989.[1] The documents used in both books are said to have been made available by a Chinese compiler under the pseudonym Zhang Liang, whose identity is hidden to protect the individual from potential persecution.[2] The English version of the book was edited and translated by Andrew J
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Jyutping
Jyutping
Jyutping
(Chinese: 粵拼; Jyutping: Jyut6ping3; Cantonese pronunciation: [jỳːt̚.pʰēŋ]) is a romanisation system for Cantonese
Cantonese
developed by the Linguistic Society of Hong Kong (LSHK), an academic group, in 1993. Its formal name is The Linguistic Society of Hong Kong Cantonese
Cantonese
Romanisation
Romanisation
Scheme
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