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Headwater (band)
Headwater is a band from Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. They have played as featured acts in festivals such as the TD Canada Trust Vancouver International Jazz Festival in 2008 and Merritt Mountain Music Festival in 2007.[1] Headwater was formed in 2001 by guitarist and percussionist Jonas Shandel and mandolinist/guitarist Matt Bryant, who had played together in a punk band in high school.[2][3] The duo began performing in the Vancouver area, including on ferries, and developed into a band with four regular members and one of several drummers.[4][5] Their debut studio album in 2006, My Old Friend, sold four thousand copies in B.C. in its first sixteen months
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Rhume
The Rhume is a 48 km (30 mi) long river in Lower Saxony, Germany. It is a right tributary of the Leine. Its source is the karstic spring of Rhume Spring in Rhumspringe, south of the Harz mountain range. The water drains with high pressure from the ground of the funnel-shaped well, known for its turquoise colour. The Rhume then flows in northwesterly direction through the municipalities of Gieboldehausen, Katlenburg-Lindau and Northeim
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River Churn

The River Churn is a tributary of the River Thames in central England. It rises at Seven Springs in Gloucestershire and flows south for approximately 37.3 km (23.2 mi) to meet the Thames at Cricklade in Wiltshire. Its length from its source to confluence with the Thames is greater than that of the Thames from Thames Head, though the Churn is regarded as a tributary rather than the main river.

The River Churn is the first tributary river of the River Thames. It rises in the Cotswolds at Seven Springs, south of Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, England and flows south across the Cotswold dip slope, passing through North Cerney and Cirencester, and joining the Thames in the parish of Cricklade in Wiltshire
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Madison River
The Madison River is a headwater tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 183 miles (295 km) long, in Wyoming and Montana. Its confluence with the Jefferson and Gallatin rivers near Three Forks, Montana forms the Missouri River. The Madison rises in Teton County in northwestern Wyoming at the confluence of the Firehole and Gibbon rivers, a location known as Madison Junction in Yellowstone National Park. It flows west then north through the mountains of southwestern Montana to join the Jefferson and Gallatin rivers at Three Forks. The Missouri River Headwaters State Park is located on the Madison at Three Forks.[3] In its upper reaches in Gallatin County, Montana, the Hebgen Dam forms Hebgen Lake. In its middle reaches in Madison County, Montana, the Madison Dam forms Ennis Lake and provides hydroelectric power. In 1959, the 1959 Hebgen Lake earthquake formed Quake Lake just downstream from Hebgen Dam
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United States Army Corps Of Engineers

The United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is an engineer formation of the United States Army that has three primary mission areas: engineer regiment, military construction, and civil works. The day-to-day activities of the three mission areas are administered by a lieutenant general known as the commanding general/chief of engineers. The chief of engineers commands the engineer regiment, composed of combat engineer army units, and answers directly to the chief of staff of the army. Combat engineers come from throughout the service and can be active duty, national guard, or army reserve. Combat engineers' duties are to construct fighting positions, fixed/floating bridges, and obstacles and defensive positions, place and detonate explosives (sappers), conduct operations that include route clearance of obstacles and rivers, prepare and install firing systems for demolition and explosives, and detect mines
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Beaverhead River
The Beaverhead River is an approximately 69-mile-long (111 km) tributary of the Jefferson River in southwest Montana (east of the Continental Divide).[1] It drains an area of roughly 4,778 square miles (12,370 km2). The river's original headwaters, formed by the confluence of the Red Rock River and Horse Prairie Creek, are now flooded under Clark Canyon Reservoir, which also floods the first 6 miles (9.7 km) of the river.[2] The Beaverhead then flows through a broad valley northward to join the Big Hole River and form the Jefferson River.[3] With the Red Rock River included in its length, the river stretches another 70 miles (110 km), for a total length of 139 miles (224 km), one of the more significant drainages of south-western Montana. The name of the Beaverhead originates from Beaverhead Rock on the middle river
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Red Rock River (Montana)
The Red Rock River is a roughly 70-mile (110 km) river in southwestern Montana in the United States. Its drainage basin covers over 1,548 square miles (4,010 km2). Its furthest tributary, Hell Roaring Creek, originates in the Beaverhead National Forest within a few hundred meters of the North American Continental Divide and Montana-Idaho border near Brower's Spring, at an elevation of about 9,100 feet (2,800 m). Brower's Spring is near the furthest headwaters of the Missouri River, one of the major watercourses of the central United States. The drainage flows north and west with its name changing to "Red Rock Creek" into the Red Rock Lakes in the middle of a wide grassy valley; the Red Rock River issues from the west side of Lower Red Rock Lake. It flows west, receiving many tributaries such as Peet Creek and Long Creek, widening into the Lima Reservoir and then passing through a canyon, which ends near Lima, Montana
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Marsh
A marsh is a wetland that is dominated by herbaceous rather than woody plant species.[1] Marshes can often be found at the edges of lakes and streams, where they form a transition between the aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. They are often dominated by grasses, rushes or reeds.[2] If woody plants are present they tend to be low-growing shrubs, and then sometimes called carrs. This form of vegetation is what differentiates marshes from other types of wetland such as swamps, which are dominated by trees, and mires, which are wetlands that have accumulated deposits of acidic peat.[3] Marshes provide a habitat for many species of plants, animals, and insects that have adapted to living in flooded conditions.[1] The plants must be able to survive in wet mud with low oxygen levels
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Kagera River
The Kagera River, also known as Akagera River, or Alexandra Nile, is an East African river, forming part of the upper headwaters of the Nile and carrying water from its most distant source.[1]:167 With a total length of 597 km (371 mi) from it source located in Lake Rweru in Rwanda. The section of river named Kagera begins in Burundi, flowing out from Lake Rweru. From the lake, it flows east along the Rwanda-Burundi and Rwanda-Tanzania borders to a confluence with the Ruvubu River. The waters of the Kagera are thus provided by two major tributaries, the Nyabarongo of Rwanda, which feeds Lake Rweru, and the Ruvubu of Burundi. It is unknown which of these two feeder rivers is the longer and hence the ultimate source of the Nile. From the confluence, the Kagera flows north along the Rwanda-Tanzania border, over Rusumo Falls and through Akagera National Park
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