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Sour Cherries
PRUNUS CERASUS (SOUR CHERRY , TART CHERRY, or DWARF CHERRY ) is a species of Prunus in the subgenus Cerasus (cherries ), native to much of Europe
Europe
and southwest Asia
Asia
. It is closely related to the sweet cherry ( Prunus avium ), but has a fruit that is more acidic . The tree is smaller than the sweet cherry (growing to a height of 4–10 m), has twiggy branches, and its crimson-to-near-black cherries are borne upon shorter stalks. There are several varieties of the SOUR CHERRY: the dark-red MORELLO CHERRY and the lighter-red varieties including the AMARELLE CHERRY, and the popular MONTMORENCY CHERRY . The Montmorency cherry is the most popular type of sour cherry. The reason for its popularity is its use in baking and recipe creation
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Pear
About 30 species; see text. Many varieties, such as the Nashi pear
Nashi pear
, are not "pear-shaped " The PEAR is any of several tree and shrub species of genus PYRUS /ˈpaɪrəs/ , in the family Rosaceae . It is also the name of the pomaceous fruit of the trees. Several species of pear are valued for their edible fruit and juices, while others are cultivated as trees. CONTENTS * 1 Etymology * 2 Description * 3 History * 4 Major recognized taxa * 5 Cultivation * 5.1 Harvest * 5.2 Diseases and pests * 6 Production * 7 Storage * 8 Uses * 9 Nutrition * 10 Cultural references * 11 See also * 12 References * 13 Further reading * 14 External links ETYMOLOGYThe word “pear” is probably from Germanic pera as a loanword of Vulgar Latin pira, the plural of pirum, akin to Greek apios (from Mycenaean ápisos), of Semitic origin ("pirâ"), meaning "fruit"
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Pollenizer
A POLLENIZER or POLLENISER, sometimes POLLINIZER or POLLINISER (see spelling differences ) is a plant that provides pollen . The word pollinator is often used when pollenizer is more precise. A pollinator is the biotic agent that moves the pollen, such as bees , moths , bats , and birds . Bees are thus often referred to as 'pollinating insects'. The verb form TO POLLENIZE is to be the source of pollen , or to be the sire of the next plant generation. While some plants are capable of self pollenization, the term is more often used in pollination management for a plant that provides abundant, compatible, and viable pollen at the same flowering time as the pollinated plant. For example, most crabapple varieties are good pollenizers for any apple tree that blooms at the same time, and are often used in apple orchards for the purpose. Some apple cultivars produce very little pollen or pollen that is sterile or incompatible with other apple varieties. These are poor pollenizers
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Soil
SOIL is a mixture of minerals , organic matter , gases, liquids, and countless organisms that together support life on Earth. Soil is a natural body called the pedosphere which has four important functions: it is a medium for plant growth; it is a means of water storage , supply and purification; it is a modifier of Earth\'s atmosphere ; it is a habitat for organisms; all of which, in turn, modify the soil. Soil has been called the _Skin of the Earth_ as it interfaces with the lithosphere , the hydrosphere , the atmosphere , and the biosphere . The term _pedolith_, used commonly to refer to the soil, literally translates _ground stone_. Soil consists of a solid phase of minerals and organic matter (the soil matrix), as well as a porous phase that holds gases (the soil atmosphere) and water (the soil solution). Accordingly, soils are often treated as a three-state system of solids, liquids, and gases
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Nitrogen
NITROGEN is a chemical element with symbol N and atomic number 7. It was first discovered and isolated by Scottish physician Daniel Rutherford in 1772. Although Carl Wilhelm Scheele and Henry Cavendish had independently done so at about the same time, Rutherford is generally accorded the credit because his work was published first. The name _nitrogen_ was suggested by Jean-Antoine-Claude Chaptal in 1790, when it was found that nitrogen was present in nitric acid and nitrates ; this name derives from the Greek roots νἰτρον "nitre " and -γεννᾶν "to form". Antoine Lavoisier suggested instead the name _AZOTE_, from the Greek άζωτικός "no life", as it is an asphyxiant gas ; his name is instead used in many languages, such as French , Russian , and Turkish , and appears in the English names of some nitrogen compounds such as hydrazine , azides and azo compounds
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Water
WATER is a transparent and nearly colorless chemical substance that is the main constituent of Earth's streams , lakes , and oceans , and the fluids of most living organisms . Its chemical formula is H2O, meaning that its molecule contains one oxygen and two hydrogen atoms , that are connected by covalent bonds . Water strictly refers to the liquid state of that substance, that prevails at standard ambient temperature and pressure ; but it often refers also to its solid state (ice ) or its gaseous state (steam or water vapor ). It also occurs in nature as snow , glaciers , ice packs and icebergs , clouds , fog , dew , aquifers , and atmospheric humidity . Water covers 71% of the Earth's surface. It is vital for all known forms of life
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Second World War
Allied victory * Collapse of Nazi Germany * Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires * Dissolution of the League of Nations * Creation of the United Nations * Emergence of the United States and the Soviet Union as superpowers * Beginning of the Cold War (more... ) PARTICIPANTS ALLIES AXIS COMMANDERS AND LEADERS MAIN ALLIED LEADERS Joseph Stalin Franklin D
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Massachusetts
MASSACHUSETTS /ˌmæsəˈtʃuːsᵻts/ (_ listen ) mass-ə-CHOO-sits_ or /ˌmæsəˈtʃuːzᵻts/ _mass-ə-CHOO-zits_ ; officially the COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS, is the most populous state in the New England region of the northeastern United States . It is bordered by the Atlantic Ocean to the east, the states of Connecticut and Rhode Island to the south, New Hampshire and Vermont to the north, and New York to the west. The state is named for the Massachusett tribe, which once inhabited the area. The capital of Massachusetts and the most populous city in New England is Boston . Over 80% of Massachusetts' population lives in the Greater Boston metropolitan area, a region influential upon American history , academia , and industry
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Great Britain
GREAT BRITAIN, also known as BRITAIN, is a large island in the north Atlantic Ocean off the northwest coast of continental Europe . With an area of 209,331 km2 (80,823 sq mi), Great Britain is the largest of the British Isles , the largest European island , and the ninth-largest island in the world . In 2011 the island had a population of about 61 million people, making it the world's third-most populous island after Java in Indonesia and Honshu in Japan . The island of Ireland is situated to the west of it, and together these islands, along with over 1,000 smaller surrounding islands , comprise the British Isles archipelago. The island is dominated by a maritime climate with quite narrow temperature differences between seasons
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Iran
IRAN (/ɪˈrɑːn/ (_ listen ), also /ɪˈræn/ ; Persian : ایران‎‎ Irān_ (_ listen )), also known as PERSIA (/ˈpɜːrʒə/ ), officially the ISLAMIC REPUBLIC OF IRAN (Persian : جمهوری اسلامی ایران‎‎ Jomhuri-ye Eslāmi-ye Irān_ (_ listen )), is a sovereign state in Western Asia . It is bordered to the northwest by Armenia , the de facto_ independent Nagorno-Karabakh Republic , the Republic of Azerbaijan , and the exclave of Nakhchivan ; to the north by the Caspian Sea ; to the northeast by Turkmenistan ; to the east by Afghanistan and Pakistan ; to the south by the Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman ; and to the west by Turkey and Iraq . With over 79.92 million inhabitants (as of March 2017 ), Iran is the world's 18th-most-populous country
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Henry VIII Of England
HENRY VIII (28 June 1491 – 28 January 1547) was King of England from 21 April 1509 until his death. Henry was the second Tudor monarch , succeeding his father, Henry VII . Henry is best known for his six marriages and, in particular, his efforts to have his first marriage, to Catherine of Aragon , annulled. His disagreement with the Pope on the question of such an annulment led Henry to initiate the English Reformation , separating the Church of England from papal authority and appointing himself the Supreme Head of the Church of England . Despite his resulting excommunication , Henry remained a believer in core Catholic
Catholic
theological teachings. Domestically, Henry is known for his radical changes to the English Constitution , ushering in the theory of the divine right of kings to England. Besides asserting the sovereign's supremacy over the Church of England, he greatly expanded royal power during his reign
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Cultivar
The term _CULTIVAR_ most commonly refers to an assemblage of plants selected for desirable characteristics that are maintained during propagation . More generally, _cultivar_ refers to the most basic classification category of cultivated plants governed by the ICNCP . Most cultivars have arisen in cultivation, but a few are special selections from the wild. Popular ornamental garden plants like roses , camellias , daffodils , rhododendrons , and azaleas are cultivars produced by careful breeding and selection for flower colour and form. Similarly, the world's agricultural food crops are almost exclusively cultivars that have been selected for characteristics such as improved yield, flavour, and resistance to disease and very few wild plants are now used as food sources. Trees used in forestry are also special selections grown for their enhanced quality and yield of timber
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Pruning
PRUNING is a horticultural and silvicultural practice involving the selective removal of certain parts of a plant, such as branches , buds , or roots . Reasons to prune plants include deadwood removal, shaping (by controlling or directing growth), improving or maintaining health, reducing risk from falling branches, preparing nursery specimens for transplanting , and both harvesting and increasing the yield or quality of flowers and fruits. The practice entails targeted removal of diseased , damaged, dead, non-productive, structurally unsound, or otherwise unwanted tissue from crop and landscape plants . In general, the smaller the branch that is cut, the easier it is for a woody plant to compartmentalize the wound and thus limit the potential for pathogen intrusion and decay. It is therefore preferable to make any necessary formative structural pruning cuts to young plants, rather than removing large, poorly placed branches from mature plants
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Somogy County (former)
Coat of arms CAPITAL Kaposvár
Kaposvár
46°21′N 17°47′E / 46.350°N 17.783°E / 46.350; 17.783 Coordinates : 46°21′N 17°47′E / 46.350°N 17.783°E / 46.350; 17.783 HISTORY • Established 11th century • Treaty of Trianon 4 June 1920 AREA • 1910 6,675 km2 (2,577 sq mi) POPULATION • 1910 365,961 Density 54.8 /km2 (142 /sq mi) TODAY PART OF Hungary
Hungary
SOMOGY was an administrative county (comitatus ) of the Kingdom of Hungary
Hungary
. Its territory, which was slightly larger than that of present Somogy county, is now in south-western Hungary
Hungary
. The capital of the county was Kaposvár
Kaposvár

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Pollination Management
POLLINATION MANAGEMENT is the label for horticultural practices that accomplish or enhance pollination of a crop, to improve yield or quality, by understanding of the particular crop's pollination needs, and by knowledgeable management of pollenizers , pollinators , and pollination conditions. CONTENTS * 1 Pollinator
Pollinator
decline * 2 Importance * 3 Types of pollinators * 4 Planning for improved pollination * 5 Improving pollination with suboptimal bee densities * 6 References * 7 Further reading * 8 External links POLLINATOR DECLINE Main article: Pollinator
Pollinator
decline With the decline of both wild and domestic pollinator populations, pollination management is becoming an increasingly important part of horticulture
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Pollen
POLLEN is a fine to coarse powdery substance comprising pollen grains which are male microgametophytes of seed plants , which produce male gametes (sperm cells). Pollen grains have a hard coat made of sporopollenin that protects the gametophytes during the process of their movement from the stamens to the pistil of flowering plants or from the male cone to the female cone of coniferous plants . If pollen lands on a compatible pistil or female cone, it germinates , producing a pollen tube that transfers the sperm to the ovule containing the female gametophyte. Individual pollen grains are small enough to require magnification to see detail. The study of pollen is called palynology and is highly useful in paleoecology, paleontology , archaeology , and forensics . Pollen in plants is used for transferring haploid male genetic material from the anther of a single flower to the stigma of another in cross-pollination
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