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Sorgo (family)
The Sorgo (in Italian), Sorkočević (in Croatian) were a noble family of the Republic of Ragusa.Contents1 Name 2 History 3 Genealogy (Austrian branch) 4 The Mirošević-Sorkočević family 5 Notable members 6 Gallery 7 See also 8 References 9 SourcesName[edit] Known as di/de Sorgo, Surgo, Sorco and Surco in Italian, their name is derived from sorghum.[1] History[edit] According to the Annals, the Sorgo was a grain-trading and ship-owning family who immigrated from Albania via Kotor
Kotor
in 1272, and were ennobled in 1292 after bringing sorghum during a famine.[1] They hailed from the
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Coats Of Arms
A coat of arms is an heraldic visual design on an escutcheon (i.e., shield), surcoat, or tabard. The coat of arms on an escutcheon forms the central element of the full heraldic achievement which in its whole consists of shield, supporters, crest, and motto
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Gusić Noble Family
Gusić were medieval Croatian nobility (clan) originating from Lika and Krbava. They formed a part of "nobility of the twelve tribes of the Croatian Kingdom" institution in the 14th century.Contents1 History1.1 Kurjaković branch2 References 3 External linksHistory[edit] Paul Gusić is named as one of the signatories of the Pacta conventa in 1102, whose authenticity as a legal document is disputed. Historian Tadija Smičiklas notes that their heraldry first appeared in 1287; an image of a goose with an arrow through its neck. At this time they were the most influential family in the Krbava county, where they often served as župans. Their seat was in Udbina, whose territories also included land of Korenica. Kurjaković branch[edit] Main article: Kurjaković noble family At the beginning of the 14th century, Kurjak Gusić (Curiaco de genere Gussich) founded the cadet branch, and thus his descendants started calling themselves as "Kurjaković"
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Batthyány
Batthyány
Batthyány
(Hungarian: [ˈbɒccaːɲi]) is the name of an old distinguished Hungarian Magnate
Magnate
family. The members of this family bear the title count or countess (Graf/Gräfin) respectively prince or princess (Fürst/Fürstin) Batthyány
Batthyány
von Német-Ujvár. A branch of the family (Croatian: Baćan) was notable in Croatia as well, producing several Bans (viceroys) of Croatia in the 16th, 17th and 18th century. The Batthyány
Batthyány
family can trace its roots to the founding of Hungary in 896 CE by Árpád. The family derives from a chieftain called Örs.[1][2][3] Árpád had seven chieftains, one by the name of Örs, which later became Kővágó-Örs. In 1398 Miklós Kővágó-Örs married Katalin Battyány
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House Of Domagojević
Domagojević dynasty was a native Croat dynasty that ruled in the Duchy of Croatia, probably from 864 until 892, with interruptions. The dynasty was named after Domagoj, the first member of dynasty known by name. The most famous of the Domagojević's are: Domagoj (the founder) and Branimir. The relation between Domagoj and Branimir is controversial. Some historians think that Branimir was a son of Domagoj, some think they were in some other family relation. Others think that there were no family relations between them. Dukes of Croatia[edit]Domagoj (864–876) Unnamed son of Domagoj (876–878) Branimir (879–892)See also[edit]List of rulers of CroatiaExternal links[edit]Members of the Domagojević family among the Croatian statesmen (in English) House of Domagojević in the chronology and history of Croatia (in Italian) Prof
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House Of Erdődy
Erdődy de Monyorókerék et Monoszló (also Erdödy) is the name of a Hungarian noble family in the Kingdom of Hungary (most notably in Croatia). Elevated to the Hungarian nobility in 1459, the family was subsequently raised to the rank of Count in 1485. In 1565 the family was then recognised by the Habsburg Monarchy who granted them the title Reichsgraf / Gräfin. The family was raised again in 1566 to the rank of Reichfürst; however, due to the death the following year of the recipient (Péter II), the title was not nostrificated and hence, did not become hereditary. The family was first raised in a document dated 1187, under the name of Bakoch de genere Erdewd. They received the title of Count in 1485. (The first hereditary count in Hungary was John Hunyadi in 1453 by the king Ladislaus V).The family origins from the town of Erdőd (Romanian: Ardud, German: Erdeed) which is in the region Szatmár (now Satu Mare in Romania)
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Festetics Family
Festetics de Tolna (singular, not plural) is the name of a historic family of Hungarian Princes and Counts of Croatian origin, during the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Mostly known for the baroque Festetics Palace and the viennese Prince Tasziló Festetics. On August 8, 1746, Josef and Kristof Festetics (the two sons of the second marriage of Paul Festetics) added de Tolna to their surname (von Tolna in Austria). On November 5, 1766, Josef's eldest son Pal Festetics de Tolna (1725–1782) was made a count by Queen Maria Theresa of Hungary. On February 24, 1772, Kristof's eldest son Pal Festetics de Tolna (1722–1782) was made a count by Queen Maria Theresa of Hungary, who was also Archduchess of Austria and Holy Roman Empress. The title of count was inheritable by all male-line descendants. On June 21, 1911, Count Tassilo Festetics de Tolna (1850–1933) was made a prince with the style Serene Highness (Durchlaucht) by King Francis Joseph I of Hungary
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House Of Frankopan
The Frankopan
Frankopan
family (Croatian: Frankopani, Frankapani; Italian: Frangipani, Hungarian: Frangepán. Latin: Frangepanus/Francopanus), was a Croatian noble family, whose members were among the great landowner magnates and high officers of the Kingdom of Hungary–Croatia.Contents1 History 2 Notable members 3 Holdings 4 Controversial name claiming 5 See also 6 ReferencesHistory[edit]The older family coat of arms, before they changed their name to "Frankopan" in 1430, and adopted Venice
Venice
influenced coat of arms.The Frankopan
Frankopan
family was one of the leading Croatian aristocratic families from 12th to 17th century. Since the 15th century they were trying to link themselves to the Roman patrician Frangipani family (which claimed descent from a Roman plebeian family of Anicii and ended in 1654 with Mario Frangipane being its last male descendant[5])
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House Of Garay
Garai or Garay (Croatian: Gorjanski) were a Hungarian-Croatian noble family, a branch of the Dorozsma (Durusma) clan, with notable members in the 14th and 15th centuries
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House Of Hrvatinić
The Hrvatinić was a medieval noble house with traditional domain in Donji Kraji in western Bosnia, that served the Kingdom of Croatia (fl. 1299–1322), the Banate of Bosnia and Kingdom of Bosnia (1325–88), and finally the Ottoman Empire (1472–76). It rose to prominence in the second half of the 14th century, and attained its peak under magnate Hrvoje Vukčić Hrvatinić (1350–1416), who also held large parts of Dalmatia. It's eponymous founder was Hrvatin (fl. 1299–1304), a count of Donji Kraji and vassal of Croatian magnate Paul I Šubić of Bribir.[1] Hrvatin's sons was part of a coalition of nobles that revolted against Mladen II Šubić of Bribir in 1316–17.[2] Between 1322 and 1325 the family submitted to the Kotromanić dynasty of the Banate of Bosnia.[3] In 1363, the Hrvatinić supported Tvrtko against Hungary, after which they rose to prominence in the region.[4] In ca
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House Of Ilok
The House of Ilok (Croatian: Iločki; Croatian pronunciation: [ilotʃki]), in old sources de Illoch, de Wylak, de Voilack etc., Hungarian: Újlaki) was a Croatian noble family, descended in the male line from Gug (in some sources Göge), a member of the lower nobility in the region of Lower Slavonia during the 13th century. The Iločki, meaning "those of Ilok", rose to be a powerful and influential family in the Croato-Hungarian Kingdom during the period in the Late Middle Ages history marked by dynastic struggles for the possession of the throne and the Ottoman wars in Europe that affected the country. Notable members of the family were Bans (viceroys) of Croatia, Voivodes (dukes)Transylvania, Palatines of Hungary, župans (counts), king's chamberlains and king's chief retainers
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Kačić Noble Family
In the context of human society, a family (from Latin: familia) is a group of people related either by consanguinity (by recognized birth), affinity (by marriage or other relationship), or co-residence (as implied by the etymology of the English word "family"[citation needed] [...] from Latin familia 'family servants, domestics collectively, the servants in a household,' thus also 'members of a household, the estate, property; the household, including relatives and servants,' abstract noun formed from famulus 'servant, slave [...]'[1]) or some combination of these.[citation needed] Members of the immediate family may include spouses, parents, brothers, sisters, sons, and daughters[citation needed]. Members of the extended family may include grandparents, aunts, uncles, cousins, nephews, nieces, and siblings-in-law[citation needed]
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John Corvinus
John Corvinus (Hungarian: Corvin János, Croatian: Ivaniš Korvin; 2 April 1473 – 12 October 1504) King of Bosnia (1495–1499). He was the illegitimate son of Matthias Corvinus, King of Hungary, and his mistress, Barbara Edelpöck.Contents1 Biography1.1 Early life 1.2 After Matthias's death 1.3 Marriage and issue2 Ancestry 3 References 4 Sources4.1 Other sourcesBiography[edit] Early life[edit] Born in Buda, he took his name from the raven (Latin: corvus) in his father's escutcheon. Matthias originally intended him for the Church, but on losing all hope of offspring from his queen, Beatrice of Naples, determined, towards the end of his life, to make the youth his successor on the throne. He loaded him with honours and riches until he was by far the wealthiest magnate in the land
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Kurjaković Noble Family
Kurjaković (de Coriach, de Curiaco, Curiacovich) were a Croatian noble family that originated from the Gusić gentis. History[edit] At the beginning of the 14th century, Kurjak Gusić founded the Kurjaković (Latin: de Coriach, de Curiaco, Curiacovich) cadet branch of the Gusić (Latin: Gussich). His descendants are known by the patronymic Kurjaković. Several members of the family served as Bans of Croatia.[1]Kurjak Gusić (Latin: Curiaco de genere Gussich, fl. 1298), comes (count, Croatian: knez) of KrbavaBudislav (fl. 1304–46), count of Krbava, served the Šubić (–1322), revolted, served the Nelipić (1322–)Salamun (fl. 1312–) Butko Kurjaković (fl. 1377–96), count of Krbava, Ban of Croatia (1393–94)Petar (fl. 1411) Franko (fl. 1436)Toma (fl. 1364–d. 1401) Nikola (fl. 1364–88)Ivan (fl. 1388–1418) Juraj (fl. 1393) Katarina (fl. 1393)Fredul Karlo (d. ca. 1377)Pavao (fl. –1402)Budislav Ivan Dujam GrgurGrgurPavao (d. 1422)Karlo (fl
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House Of Svačić
Petar Snačić (Svačić) was a feudal lord, notable for being one of the claimants of the Croatian throne during the wars of succession (c. 1093–1097). It is assumed that he began as a ban serving under king Demetrius Zvonimir of Croatia and was then elected king by the Croatian feudal lords in 1093. Petar's seat of power was based in Knin. His rule was marked by a struggle for control of the country with Coloman of Hungary. During his reign he was able to expel Álmos of Hungary from Slavonia, and unite Croatia to the river Drava. According to Juraj Utješinović, alias Frater Georgius, first Croatian cardinal, Petar was born in Kamičak (above river Krka canyon), Croatia. He died in 1097 and was the last native king of Croatia (reigned 1093–1097).[citation needed] Struggle for the succession[edit]Croatian Kingdom during Petar Snačić reign.He assumed the throne amid deep tension throughout the Kingdom
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House Of Lacković
The Lackfi, Laczkfi or Laczkfy (Croatian: Lacković) was a noble family from Kingdom of Hungary and Croatia, which governed parts of Transylvania (as Count of the Székelys) and held the title of Voivode of Transylvania in the 14th century. The Lackfi family were one of the most prestigious families in 14th-century Kingdom of Hungary during the reign of the Capetian House of Anjou.[1] The family also gave several Bans of Croatia (Slavonia and Dalmatia included) and Bulgaria, and held the titles of Palatine of Hungary and Prince of Zadar, as well as a Viceroy to Kingdom of Naples
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