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Sorghum Bicolor
Sorghum
Sorghum
bicolor, commonly called sorghum[2] (/ˈsɔːrɡəm/) and also known as great millet,[3] durra, jowari, or milo, is a grass species cultivated for its grain, which is used for food for humans, animal feed, and ethanol production. Sorghum
Sorghum
originated in northern Africa, and is now cultivated widely in tropical and subtropical regions.[4] Sorghum
Sorghum
is the world's fifth-most important cereal crop after rice, wheat, maize, and barley. S. bicolor is typically an annual, but some cultivars are perennial. It grows in clumps that may reach over 4 m high
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Taxonomy (biology)
Taxonomy (from Ancient Greek τάξις (taxis), meaning 'arrangement', and -νομία (-nomia), meaning 'method') is the science of defining and naming groups of biological organisms on the basis of shared characteristics. Organisms are grouped together into taxa (singular: taxon) and these groups are given a taxonomic rank; groups of a given rank can be aggregated to form a super-group of higher rank, thus creating a taxonomic hierarchy. The principal ranks in modern use are domain, kingdom, phylum (division is sometimes used in botany in place of phylum), class, order, family, genus and species
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Baijiu
Baijiu
Baijiu
(Chinese: 白酒; pinyin: báijiǔ), also known as shaojiu, is a Chinese alcoholic beverage made from grain. Báijiǔ literally means "white (clear) alcohol" or liquor, and is a strong distilled spirit, generally 52% alcohol by volume (ABV) (US: 104° proof). Báijiǔ is a clear liquid usually distilled from fermented sorghum, although other grains may be used; southern China
China
versions may employ glutinous rice, while northern Chinese varieties may use wheat, barley, millet, or even Job's tears (yìyǐ) instead of sorghum. The jiuqu starter culture used in the production of baijiu mash is usually made of pulverized wheat grains.[1][2][3][4][5][6] Because of its clarity, baijiu can appear similar to several other East Asian liquors, but it generally has a significantly higher alcohol content than, for example, Japanese shōchū (25%) or Korean soju (20–45%)
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Milligram
The kilogram or kilogramme (symbol: kg) is the base unit of mass in the International System of Units
International System of Units
(SI), and is defined as being equal to the mass of the International Prototype of the Kilogram
Kilogram
(IPK, also known as "Le Grand K" or "Big K"),[2] a cylinder of platinum-iridium alloy stored by the International Bureau of Weights and Measures
International Bureau of Weights and Measures
at Saint-Cloud, France. The kilogram was originally defined as the mass of a litre (cubic decimetre) of water at its freezing point. That was an inconvenient quantity to precisely replicate, so in the late 18th century a platinum artefact was fashioned as a standard for the kilogram
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International Unit
In pharmacology, the international unit is a unit of measurement for the amount of a substance; the mass or volume that constitutes one international unit varies based on which substance is being measured, and the variance is based on the biological activity or effect, for the purpose of easier comparison across substances. International units are used to quantify vitamins, hormones, some medications, vaccines, blood products, and similar biologically active substances. The name international unit has often been capitalized (in English and other languages), although major English-language dictionaries treat it as a common noun and thus use lower case. The name has several accepted abbreviations
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Dietary Reference Intake
The Dietary Reference Intake (DRI) is a system of nutrition recommendations from the Institute of Medicine
Institute of Medicine
(IOM) of the National Academies (United States).[1] It was introduced in 1997 in order to broaden the existing guidelines known as Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs, see below)
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Millwork (building Material)
Millwork building materials are historically any woodmill-produced building construction interior-finish, exterior-finish, or decorative components. Stock profiled and patterned millwork building components fabricated by milling at a planing mill can usually be installed with minimal alteration.[1] Today, millwork also encompasses items that are made using alternatives to wood, including synthetics, plastics, and wood-adhesive composites.Contents1 Specifics 2 Historical context 3 Fabrication 4 Uses 5 Types 6 ReferencesSpecifics[edit] Millwork building materials include the ready-made carpentry elements usually installed in any building.[2] Many of the specific features of the space are created using different types of architectural millwork: doors, window casings, and cabinets to name just a few.[1][3] The materials used in millwork items today are most often graded-lumber, code compliant fasteners, various glasses, and other decorative coatings and finishes
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Kirei Board
Kirei(TM) Board is an engineered panel product of the company Kirei USA, constructed from the left-over, post-harvest stalks of the sorghum plant. Its manufacture is more involved than that of particle board, as the stalks are first woven tightly and then heat-pressed with an adhesive. Designed to be strong, lightweight, environmentally friendly and sustainable, Kirei Board is intended for wall coverings, cabinetry, furniture, flooring and other decorative and finished products. The word kirei (JP 奇麗/きれい;IPA [ki 'rei]) is a Japanese adjective possessing a range of meanings: beautiful, clean, pure and truthful. In some applications, Kirei Board is used as a decorative material in its own right (featuring its visually distinctive grain), while in others it is used as a building wood in cabinets and shelving, then covered with a veneer of another wood. As it is a soft material, Kirei board is not indicated for flooring in high traffic areas
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Molasses
Molasses, or black treacle (British, for human consumption; known as molasses otherwise), is a viscous product resulting from refining sugarcane or sugar beets into sugar. Molasses
Molasses
varies by amount of sugar, method of extraction, and age of plant. Sugarcane
Sugarcane
molasses is primarily used for sweetening and flavoring foods in the United States, Canada, and elsewhere, while sugar beet molasses is foul-smelling and unpalatable, so it is mainly (mostly) used as an animal feed additive in Europe and Russia, where it is chiefly produced. Molasses
Molasses
is a defining component of fine commercial brown sugar.[1] Sweet sorghum
Sweet sorghum
syrup may be colloquially called "sorghum molasses" in the southern United States.[2][3] Similar products include treacle, honey, maple syrup, corn syrup, and invert syrup
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China
China, officially the People's Republic
People's Republic
of China
China
(PRC), is a unitary sovereign state in East Asia
East Asia
and the world's most populous country, with a population of around 1.404 billion.[13] Covering approximately 9,600,000 square kilometers (3,700,000 sq mi), it is the third- or fourth-largest country by total area,[k][19] depending on the source consulted. China
China
also has the most neighbor countries in the world
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Fermentation (food)
Fermentation
Fermentation
in food processing is the process of converting carbohydrates to alcohol or organic acids using microorganisms—yeasts or bacteria—under anaerobic conditions. Fermentation
Fermentation
usually implies that the action of microorganisms is desired. The science of fermentation is known as zymology or zymurgy. The term fermentation sometimes refers specifically to the chemical conversion of sugars into ethanol, producing alcoholic drinks such as wine, beer, and cider. However, similar processes take place in the leavening of bread (CO2 produced by yeast activity), and in the preservation of sour foods with the production of lactic acid, such as in sauerkraut and yogurt. Other widely consumed fermented foods include vinegar, olives, and cheese
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Distilled
Distillation
Distillation
is the process of separating the components or substances from a liquid mixture by selective boiling and condensation. Distillation
Distillation
may result in essentially complete separation (nearly pure components), or it may be a partial separation that increases the concentration of selected components of the mixture. In either case the process exploits differences in the volatility of the mixture's components. In industrial chemistry, distillation is a unit operation of practically universal importance, but it is a physical separation process and not a chemical reaction. Distillation
Distillation
has many applications
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Maotai
Maotai
Maotai
or Moutai is a brand of baijiu, a distilled Chinese liquor (spirit), made in the town of Maotai
Maotai
in China's Guizhou
Guizhou
province. Produced by the state-owned Kweichow Moutai
Kweichow Moutai
Company, the beverage is distilled from fermented sorghum and now comes in several different varieties.[1] Maotai
Maotai
originated during the Qing Dynasty
Qing Dynasty
(1644–1912), when northern Chinese distillers introduced advanced techniques to local processes to create a distinctive type of baijiu. Thereafter Maotai
Maotai
was produced at several local distilleries. During the Chinese Civil War, People's Liberation Army forces camped at Maotai
Maotai
and partook of the local liquor
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Plant
Plants are mainly multicellular, predominantly photosynthetic eukaryotes of the kingdom Plantae. They form the clade Viridiplantae (Latin for "green plants") that includes the flowering plants, conifers and other gymnosperms, ferns, clubmosses, hornworts, liverworts, mosses and the green algae, and excludes the red and brown algae. Historically, plants were treated as one of two kingdoms including all living things that were not animals, and all algae and fungi were treated as plants. However, all current definitions of Plantae exclude the fungi and some algae, as well as the prokaryotes (the archaea and bacteria). Green plants have cell walls containing cellulose and obtain most of their energy from sunlight via photosynthesis by primary chloroplasts that are derived from endosymbiosis with cyanobacteria. Their chloroplasts contain chlorophylls a and b, which gives them their green color
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India
India, officially the Republic
Republic
of India
India
(IAST: Bhārat Gaṇarājya),[e] is a country in South Asia. It is the seventh-largest country by area, the second-most populous country (with over 1.2 billion people), and the most populous democracy in the world. It is bounded by the Indian Ocean
Indian Ocean
on the south, the Arabian Sea on the southwest, and the Bay of Bengal
Bay of Bengal
on the southeast. It shares land borders with Pakistan
Pakistan
to the west;[f] China, Nepal, and Bhutan
Bhutan
to the northeast; and Myanmar
Myanmar
and Bangladesh
Bangladesh
to the east. In the Indian Ocean, India
India
is in the vicinity of Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka
and the Maldives
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Bhakri
Bhakri
Bhakri
is a round flat unleavened bread often used in the cuisine of the states of Maharashtra, Gujarat, Goa, in India
India
along with several regions of western and central India, including areas of Rajasthan, Malwa, and Karnataka. It is coarser than a regular wheat roti. It can be either soft or hard in texture, similar to Khakhra
Khakhra
in respect to hardness.[1]Contents1 Details 2 Preparations 3 Types of Bhakri 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksDetails[edit] Being a staple bread, bhakri is served with curd, chutney, baingan bharta, vegetables, and rice. It is made mostly from Jowar
Jowar
flour, Bajra flour, Nachni (or finger millet) flour,[2] and even rice flour (in the Konkan
Konkan
region)
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