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Solomon Schechter
Solomon Schechter (Hebrew: שניאור זלמן הכהן שכטר‬‎; 7 December 1847 – 19 November 1915) was a Moldavian-born American rabbi, academic scholar and educator, most famous for his roles as founder and President of the United Synagogue of America, President of the Jewish Theological Seminary of America, and architect of American Conservative Judaism.Contents1 Early life 2 Academic career 3 American Jewish community 4 Religious and cultural beliefs 5 Legacy 6 Bibliography 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksEarly life[edit] He was born in Focşani, Moldavia
Moldavia
(now Romania) to Rabbi
Rabbi
Yitzchok Hakohen, a shochet and member of Chabad
Chabad
hasidim. He was named after its founder, Shneur Zalman of Liadi
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Vienna
Vienna
Vienna
(/viˈɛnə/ ( listen);[9][10] German: Wien, pronounced [viːn] ( listen)) is the capital and largest city of Austria
Austria
and one of the nine states of Austria. Vienna
Vienna
is Austria's primary city, with a population of about 1.8 million[1] (2.6 million within the metropolitan area,[4] nearly one third of Austria's population), and its cultural, economic, and political centre. It is the 7th-largest city by population within city limits in the European Union
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United Kingdom
The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(UK) or Britain, is a sovereign country in western Europe
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Joseph Saul Nathanson
Joseph Saul Nathansohn (1808–1875) (Hebrew: יוסף שאול בן אריה הלוי) was a Polish rabbi and posek, and a leading rabbinical authority of his day.Contents1 Biography 2 Works 3 References 4 External links and referencesBiography[edit] Rabbi
Rabbi
Nathansohn was born at Berezhany
Berezhany
(Berzan), Galicia (today's western Ukraine); he was the son of Aryeh Lebush Nathanson, rabbi at Berzan and author of "Bet El." He studied Talmud
Talmud
at Lviv
Lviv
(Lemberg) together with his brother-in-law Mordecai Zeeb Ettinger. In the 1830s in Lemberg—then under the rule of the Austrian Empire—he founded an informal study-group under his tutelage; this yeshiva attracted some of the most brilliant students in Galicia. In 1857 Nathanson was elected rabbi of Lemberg, where he officiated for eighteen years
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Lviv
Lviv
Lviv
(Ukrainian: Львів [lʲʋiu̯] ( listen); Russian: Львов Lvov; Polish: Lwów[2] [lvuf] ( listen); German: Lemberg; see also other names) is the largest city in western Ukraine and the seventh-largest city in the country overall, with a population of around 728,350 as of 2016. Lviv
Lviv
is one of the main cultural centres of Ukraine. Named in honor of Leo, the eldest son of Daniel, King of Ruthenia, it was the capital of the Kingdom of Galicia–Volhynia
Kingdom of Galicia–Volhynia
(also called Kingdom of Rus')[3] from 1272 to 1349, when it was conquered by King Casimir III the Great
Casimir III the Great
who then became known as the King of Poland
Poland
and Rus'. From 1434, it was the regional capital of the Ruthenian Voivodeship in the Kingdom of Poland
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Principality Of Moldavia
Moldavia
Moldavia
(Romanian: Moldova, pronounced [molˈdova] ( listen) or Țara Moldovei (in Romanian Latin alphabet), Цара Мѡлдовєй (in old Romanian Cyrillic alphabet)) is a historical region and former principality in Eastern Europe, corresponding to the territory between the Eastern Carpathians and the Dniester
Dniester
River. An initially independent and later autonomous state, it existed from the 14th century to 1859, when it united with Wallachia
Wallachia
(Țara Românească) as the basis of the modern Romanian state; at various times, Moldavia
Moldavia
included the regions of Bessarabia
Bessarabia
(with the Budjak), all of Bukovina
Bukovina
and Hertza
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Latin
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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Hochschule Für Die Wissenschaft Des Judentums
Hochschule für die Wissenschaft des Judentums, or Higher Institute for Jewish Studies, was a rabbinical seminary, established in Berlin in 1872 and closed down by the Nazi government of Germany in 1942. Upon the order of the government, the name was officially changed (1883–1923 and 1933–42) to Lehranstalt für die Wissenschaft des Judentums.Contents1 History 2 Notable alumni 3 References 4 Further reading 5 External linksHistory[edit] Abraham Geiger, who had been active in establishing Reform Judaism, wanted a university for Jewish studies in Berlin. Unable to become part of the University of Berlin, he was involved in 1870 in creating a separate institution
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Greek Language
Greek (Modern Greek: ελληνικά [eliniˈka], elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα [eliniˈci ˈɣlosa] ( listen), ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece
Greece
and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean
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University Of Berlin
The Humboldt University
Humboldt University
of Berlin
Berlin
(German: Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, abbreviated HU Berlin), established in 1810,[4] is a university in the central borough of Mitte
Mitte
in Berlin, Germany. It was established by Frederick William III on the initiative of Wilhelm von Humboldt as the University of Berlin, making it the oldest of Berlin's four universities.[n 1] The university is divided into nine faculties, including its medical school shared with the Free University of Berlin, has a student enrollment of around 32,000 students, and offers degree programmes in some 189 disciplines from undergraduate to postdoctorate level.[5] Its main campus is located on the Unter den Linden
Unter den Linden
boulevard in central Berlin
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Tutor
A tutor is an instructor who gives private lessons. Shadow education is a name for private supplementary tutoring that is offered outside the mainstream education system. Typically, a tutor provides academic assistance to one or more students on certain subject areas
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Piatra Neamţ
Piatra Neamț
Piatra Neamț
(Romanian pronunciation: [ˈpjatra ˈne̯amt͡s]), German: Kreuzburg an der Bistritz, Hungarian: Karácsonkő) is the capital city of Neamț County, in the historical region of Moldavia, eastern Romania. Because of its privileged location in the Eastern Carpathian mountains, it is considered one of the most picturesque cities in Romania. The Nord-Est Regional Development Agency is located in Piatra Neamț.Contents1 Etymology 2 Geography and access 3 History 4 Demographics 5 Economy 6 Culture and education 7 Attractions7.1 Landmarks 7.2 Parks8 Sports 9 Natives 10 International Relations10.1 Twin towns - sister cities11 In popular culture11.1 Astronomical Dedication12 Photo gallery 13 References 14 External linksEtymology[edit] The piatra toponym (meaning rock in Romanian) was always part of the settlement's name throughout its history
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Rabbinics
Rabbinic Judaism
Judaism
or Rabbinism (Hebrew: יהדות רבנית‬ Yahadut Rabanit) has been the mainstream form of Judaism
Judaism
since the 6th century CE, after the codification of the Babylonian Talmud. Growing out of Pharisaic Judaism, Rabbinic Judaism
Judaism
is based on the belief that at Mount Sinai, Moses
Moses
received from God
God
the Written Torah
Torah
(Pentateuch) in addition to an oral explanation, known as the "Oral Torah," that Moses
Moses
transmitted to the people. Rabbinic Judaism
Judaism
contrasts with the Sadducees, Karaite Judaism
Judaism
and Samaritanism, which do not recognize the oral law as a divine authority nor the Rabbinic procedures used to interpret Jewish scripture
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Claude Montefiore
Montefiore is a surname associated with the Montefiore family, Sephardi Jews who were diplomats and bankers all over Europe and who originated from the Iberian Peninsula, namely Spain and Portugal, and also France, Morocco, England, and Italy
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London
London
London
(/ˈlʌndən/ ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city of England
England
and the United Kingdom.[7][8] Standing on the River Thames
River Thames
in the south east of the island of Great Britain, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. It was founded by the Romans, who named it Londinium.[9] London's ancient core, the City of London, largely retains its 1.12-square-mile (2.9 km2) medieval boundaries
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Solomon Marcus Schiller-Szinessy
Solomon Marcus Schiller-Szinessy, sometimes Solomon Mayer Schiller-Szinessy (23 December 1820, Budapest, Hungary
Hungary
- 11 March 1890, Cambridge) was a Hungarian rabbi and academic. He became the first Jewish Reader in Talmudic and Rabbinic Literature at the University of Cambridge. Life[edit] He graduated as doctor of philosophy and mathematics from the University of Jena, being subsequently ordained as a rabbi. He was next appointed assistant professor at the Lutheran College of Eperies, Hungary. During the great upheaval of 1848 he supported the revolutionists in the war between Hungary
Hungary
and Austria, and it was he who executed the order of General Torök
General Torök
to blow up the bridge at Szeged, by which act the advance of the Austrian army was checked. Wounded and taken prisoner, he was confined in a fortress, from which he managed to escape the night before his intended execution
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