HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Solar Plexus
The celiac plexus or coeliac plexus, also known as the solar plexus because of its radiating nerve fibers,[1] is a complex network of nerves (a nerve plexus) located in the abdomen, near where the celiac trunk, superior mesenteric artery, and renal arteries branch from the abdominal aorta. It is behind the stomach and the omental bursa, and in front of the crura of the diaphragm, on the level of the first lumbar vertebra. The plexus is formed in part by the greater and lesser splanchnic nerves of both sides, and fibers from the anterior and posterior vagal trunks. The celiac plexus proper consists of the celiac ganglia with a network of interconnecting fibers
[...More...]

"Solar Plexus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Parasympathetic Root Of Ciliary Ganglion
The parasympathetic root of ciliary ganglion provides parasympathetic innervation to the ciliary ganglion. The ciliary ganglion is a parasympathetic ganglion. Incoming parasympathetic nerve fibers form synapses with the dendrites of nerve cells within the ganglion. However, the ciliary ganglion is not simply a relay station connecting preganglionic to postganglionic nerve fibers. There are roughly twice as many incoming parasympathetic fibers as outgoing parasympathetic fibers. Neural processing occurs as incoming signals converge onto target neurons.Contents1 Presynaptic 2 Postsynaptic 3 See also 4 External linksPresynaptic[edit] Presynaptic parasympathetic fibers originate in the Edinger-Westphal nucleus, the parasympathetic motor nucleus associated with the oculomotor nucleus in the brainstem. Axons from the Edinger-Westphal nucleus and the oculomotor nucleus run together in the brainstem and exit together as the oculomotor nerve (cranial nerve III)
[...More...]

"Parasympathetic Root Of Ciliary Ganglion" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Chronic Pancreatitis
Chronic pancreatitis is a long-standing inflammation of the pancreas that alters the organ's normal structure and functions.[3] It can present as episodes of acute inflammation in a previously injured pancreas, or as chronic damage with persistent pain or malabsorption. It is a disease process characterized by irreversible damage to the pancreas as distinct from reversible changes in acute pancreatitis.[medical citation needed]Contents1 Signs and symptoms 2 Causes 3 Pathophysiology 4 Diagnosis 5 Treatment5.1 Pancreatic enzymes 5.2 Surgery6 Epidemiology 7 See also 8 References 9 Further reading 10 External linksSigns and symptoms[edit]Upper abdominal pain: Upper abdominal pain which increases after drinking or eating, lessens when fasting or sitting and leaning forward. Some people may not suffer pain.[4][2] Nausea and vomiting[4][2] Steatorrhea: Frequent, oily, foul-smelling bowel movements
[...More...]

"Chronic Pancreatitis" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Renal Plexus
The renal plexus is formed by filaments from the celiac ganglia and plexus, aorticorenal ganglia, lower thoracic splanchnic nerves and first lumbar splanchnic nerve and aortic plexus.[1] The nerves from these sources, fifteen or twenty in number, have a few ganglia developed upon them. It enters the kidneys on arterial branches to supply the vessels, Renal glomerulus, and tubules with branches to the ureteric plexus.[1] Some filaments are distributed to the spermatic plexus and, on the right side, to the inferior vena cava. The ovarian plexus arises from the renal plexus, and is one of two sympathetic supplies distributed to the ovary and fundus of the uterus. Additional images[edit]Lower half of right sympathetic cord.References[edit] This article incorporates text in the public domain from page 987 of the 20th edition of Gray's Anatomy
Gray's Anatomy
(1918)^ a b Claudia R. Senesac; Mark Bishop (2010). Finley's Interactive Cadaveric Dissection Guide
[...More...]

"Renal Plexus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Testicular Plexus
The spermatic plexus (or testicular plexus) is derived from the renal plexus, receiving branches from the aortic plexus
[...More...]

"Testicular Plexus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Ovarian Plexus
The ovarian plexus arises from the renal plexus, and is distributed to the ovary, and fundus of the uterus. It is carried in the suspensory ligament of the ovary.[1] References[edit] This article incorporates text in the public domain from page 987 of the 20th edition of Gray's Anatomy (1918)^ suspensory+ligament+of+ovary at eMedicine DictionaryExternal links[edit]v t eAnatomy of the autonomic nervous systemHeadSympatheticCervical ganglia: roots long ciliary Deep petrosalParasympatheticCiliary ganglion: rootsSensory ParasympatheticShort ciliaryPterygopalatine ganglion: deep petrosal nerve of pterygoid canalbranches of distribution: greater palatineinferior posterior nasal brancheslesser palatine nasopalatinemedial superior posterior nasal branchespharyngealSubmandibular ganglionOtic ganglionNeckSympatheticparavertebral ganglia: C
[...More...]

"Ovarian Plexus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Superior Mesenteric Plexus
The superior mesenteric plexus is a continuation of the lower part of the celiac plexus, receiving a branch from the junction of the right vagus nerve with the plexus. It surrounds the superior mesenteric artery, accompanies it into the mesentery, and divides into a number of secondary plexuses, which are distributed to all the parts supplied by the artery, viz., pancreatic branches to the pancreas; intestinal branches to the small intestine; and ileocolic, right colic, and middle colic branches, which supply the corresponding parts of the great intestine. The nerves composing this plexus are white in color and firm in texture; in the upper part of the plexus close to the origin of the superior mesenteric artery is the superior mesenteric ganglion. Additional images[edit]The right sympathetic chain and its connections with the thoracic, abdominal, and pelvic plexuses.Diagram of efferent sympathetic nervous system.Lower half of right sympathetic cord.Referenc
[...More...]

"Superior Mesenteric Plexus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Getting The Wind Knocked Out Of You
Getting the wind knocked out of you is a commonly used idiom that refers to a kind of diaphragm spasm that occurs when sudden force is applied to the abdomen which puts pressure on the solar plexus. This often happens in contact sports, a forceful blow to the abdomen, or by falling on the back. It results in a temporary paralysis of the diaphragm that makes it difficult to breathe.[1] This can lead to anxiety and there may be residual pain from the original blow, but the condition typically clears spontaneously in a minute or two. This can lead to continued difficulty breathing, standing, or sitting. See also[edit]Heimlich maneuverReferences[edit] Notes^ "What happens when you get winded?". BBC News. 28 September 2005. SourcesMacAuley, D (2007). Oxford Handbook of Sport and Exercise Medicine. Oxford University Press. p. 572. ISBN 0-19-856839-8.  Shultz, Sandra J.; Houglum, Peggy A.; Perrin, David H. (2005). Examination of Musculoskeletal Injuries
[...More...]

"Getting The Wind Knocked Out Of You" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Viscera
Organs are collections of tissues with a similar function. Plant
Plant
and animal life relies on many organs that coexist in organ systems.[2] Organs are composed of main tissue, parenchyma, and "sporadic" tissues, stroma. The main tissue is that which is unique for the specific organ, such as the myocardium, the main tissue of the heart, while sporadic tissues include the nerves, blood vessels, and connective tissues. The main tissues that make up an organ tend to have common embryologic origins, such as arising from the same germ layer. Functionally related organs often cooperate to form whole organ systems. Organs exist in all organisms. In single-celled organisms such as bacteria the functional analogue of an organ is known as an organelle
[...More...]

"Viscera" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pain
Pain
Pain
is a distressing feeling often caused by intense or damaging stimuli. The International Association for the Study of Pain's widely used definition defines pain as "an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage, or described in terms of such damage";[1] however, due to it being a complex, subjective phenomenon, defining pain has been a challenge
[...More...]

"Pain" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fluoroscopy
Fluoroscopy
Fluoroscopy
(/flʊəˈrɒskəpi/[1]) is an imaging technique that uses X-rays to obtain real-time moving images of the interior of an object. In its primary application of medical imaging, a fluoroscope (/ˈflʊərəˌskoʊp/[2][3]) allows a physician to see the internal structure and function of a patient, so that the pumping action of the heart or the motion of swallowing, for example, can be watched. This is useful for both diagnosis and therapy and occurs in general radiology, interventional radiology, and image-guided surgery. In its simplest form, a fluoroscope consists of an X-ray
X-ray
source and a fluorescent screen, between which a patient is placed. However, since the 1950s most fluoroscopes have included X-ray
X-ray
image intensifiers and cameras as well, to improve the image's visibility and make it available on a remote display screen
[...More...]

"Fluoroscopy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pancreatic Cancer
Pancreatic cancer
Pancreatic cancer
arises when cells in the pancreas, a glandular organ behind the stomach, begin to multiply out of control and form a mass. These cancerous cells have the ability to invade other parts of the body.[10] There are a number of types of pancreatic cancer.[6] The most common, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, accounts for about 85% of cases, and the term "pancreatic cancer" is sometimes used to refer only to that type.[6] These adenocarcinomas start within the part of the pancreas which makes digestive enzymes.[6] Several other typ
[...More...]

"Pancreatic Cancer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

CT Scans
A CT scan, also known as computed tomography scan, makes use of computer-processed combinations of many X-ray
X-ray
measurements taken from different angles to produce cross-sectional (tomographic) images (virtual "slices") of specific areas of a scanned object, allowing the user to see inside the object without cutting. Other terms include computed axial tomography (CAT scan) and computer aided tomography. Digital geometry processing is used to further generate a three-dimensional volume of the inside of the object from a large series of two-dimensional radiographic images taken around a single axis of rotation.[2] Medical imaging
Medical imaging
is the most common application of X-ray
X-ray
CT
[...More...]

"CT Scans" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cardiac Plexus
The cardiac plexus is a plexus of nerves situated at the base of the heart that innervates the heart.Contents1 Structure 2 Superficial part 3 Deep part3.1 Right half 3.2 Left half4 See also 5 References 6 External linksStructure[edit] The cardiac plexus is divided into a superficial part, which lies in the concavity of the aortic arch, and a deep part, between the aortic arch and the trachea. The two parts are, however, closely connected. Superficial part[edit] The superficial part of the cardiac plexus lies beneath the arch of the aorta, in front of the right pulmonary artery. It is formed by the superior cervical cardiac branch of the left sympathetic trunk and the inferior cardiac branch of the left vagus nerve. A small ganglion, the cardiac ganglion of Wrisberg, is occasionally found connected with these nerves at their point of junction. This ganglion, when present, is situated immediately beneath the arch of the aorta, on the right side of the l
[...More...]

"Cardiac Plexus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Pancreatic Plexus
In human neuroanatomy, the pancreatic plexus is a division of the celiac plexus (coeliac plexus) in the abdomen. External links[edit]v t eAnatomy of the autonomic nervous systemHeadSympatheticCervical ganglia: roots long ciliary Deep petrosalParasympatheticCiliary ganglion: rootsSensory ParasympatheticShort ciliaryPterygopalatine ganglion: deep petrosal nerve of pterygoid canalbranches of distribution: greater palatineinferior posterior nasal brancheslesser palatine nasopalatinemedial superior posterior nasal branchespharyngealSubmandibular ganglionOtic ganglionNeckSympatheticparavertebral ganglia: Cervical gangliaSuperior Middle InferiorStellate ganglionprevertebral plexus: Cavernous plexus Internal carotidChestSympatheticparavertebral ganglia: Thoracic gangliaprevertebral plexus: Cardiac plexus Eso
[...More...]

"Pancreatic Plexus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Superior Hypogastric Plexus
The superior hypogastric plexus (in older texts, hypogastric plexus or presacral nerve) is a plexus of nerves situated on the vertebral bodies anterior to the bifurcation of the abdominal aorta.Contents1 Structure 2 Clinical significance 3 Additional images 4 References 5 External linksStructure[edit] From the plexus, sympathetic fibers are carried into the pelvis as two main trunks- the right and left hypogastric nerves- each lying medial to the internal iliac artery and its branches. The right and left hypogastric nerves continues as Inferior hypogastric plexus; these hypogastric nerves send sympathetic fibers to the ovarian and ureteric plexi, which originate within the renal and abdominal aortic sympathetic plexi. The superior hypogastric plexus receives contributions from the two lower lumbar splanchnic nerves (L3-L4), which are branches of the chain ganglia
[...More...]

"Superior Hypogastric Plexus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.