HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Soil Salinity Control
Soil salinity
Soil salinity
control relates to controlling the problem of soil salinity and reclaiming salinized agricultural land. The aim of soil salinity control is to prevent soil degradation by salination and reclaim already salty (saline) soils. Soil
Soil
reclamation is also called soil improvement, rehabilitation, remediation, recuperation, or amelioration. The primary man-made cause of salinization is irrigation. River
River
water or groundwater used in irrigation contains salts, which remain behind in the soil after the water has evaporated. The primary method of controlling soil salinity is to permit 10-20% of the irrigation water to leach the soil,that will be drained and discharged through an appropriate drainage system
[...More...]

"Soil Salinity Control" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

CumFreq
In statistics and data analysis the application software CumFreq
CumFreq
is a tool for cumulative frequency analysis of a single variable and for probability distribution fitting. Originally the method was developed for the analysis of hydrological measurements of spatially varying magnitudes (e.g. hydraulic conductivity of the soil) and of magnitudes varying in time (e.g. rainfall, river discharge) to find their return periods
[...More...]

"CumFreq" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Latin America
Latin
Latin
America[a] is a group of countries and dependencies in the Western Hemisphere where Spanish, French and Portuguese are spoken. The term originated in the French government in the mid-19th century as Amérique latine to consider French-speaking territories in the Americas
Americas
(Haiti, French Guiana, Martinique, Guadeloupe, Saint Martin, Saint Barthélemy) along with the larger group of countries where Spanish and Portuguese languages prevailed. It is, therefore, broader than the terms Ibero-America
Ibero-America
or Hispanic
Hispanic
America. The term excludes French Canada and modern French Louisiana. Latin
Latin
America consists of nineteen sovereign states and several territories and dependencies which cover an area that stretches from the northern border of Mexico
Mexico
to the southern tip of South America, including the Caribbean
[...More...]

"Latin America" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Crop Yield
In agriculture, crop yield (also known as "agricultural output") refers to both the measure of the yield of a crop per unit area of land cultivation, and the seed generation of the plant itself (e.g. if three grains are harvested for each grain seeded, the resulting yield is 1:3). The figure, 1:3 is considered by agronomists as the minimum required to sustain human life.[1] One of the three seeds must be set aside for the next planting season, the remaining two either consumed by the grower, or one for human consumption and the other for livestock feed[citation needed]. The higher the surplus, the more livestock can be established and maintained, thereby increasing the physical and economic well-being of the farmer and his family. This, in turn, resulted in better stamina, better over-all health, and better, more efficient work
[...More...]

"Crop Yield" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Oxygenation (environmental)
Environmental oxygenation can be important to the sustainability of a particular ecosystem. Insufficient oxygen (environmental hypoxia) may occur in bodies of water such as ponds and rivers, tending to suppress the presence of aerobic organisms such as fish. Deoxygenation increases the relative population of anaerobic organisms such as plants and some bacteria, resulting in fish kills and other adverse events. The net effect is to alter the balance of nature by increasing the concentration of anaerobic over aerobic species. Oxygenation by water aeration can be part of the environmental remediation of a usually stagnant body of water
[...More...]

"Oxygenation (environmental)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Semi Arid
A semi-arid climate or steppe climate is the climate of a region that receives precipitation below potential evapotranspiration, but not as low as a desert climate. There are different kinds of semi-arid climates, depending on variables such as temperature, and they give rise to different biomes.Regions with semi-arid climates   BSh   BSkContents1 Defining attributes of semi-arid climates 2 Hot semi-arid climates 3 Cold semi-arid climates 4 Regions of varying classification 5 Charts of selected cities 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksDefining attributes of semi-arid climates[edit] A more precise definition is given by the Köppen climate classification, which treats steppe climates (BSk and BSh) as intermediates between desert climates (BW) and humid climates in ecological characteristics and agricultural potential
[...More...]

"Semi Arid" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Topographical
Topography
Topography
is the study of the shape and features of the surface of the Earth
Earth
and other observable astronomical objects including planets, moons, and asteroids. The topography of an area could refer to the surface shapes and features themselves, or a description (especially their depiction in maps). This field of geoscience and planetary science is concerned with local detail in general, including not only relief but also natural and artificial features, and even local history and culture. This meaning is less common in the United States, where topographic maps with elevation contours have made "topography" synonymous with relief. The older sense of topography as the study of place still has currency in Europe. Topography
Topography
in a narrow sense involves the recording of relief or terrain, the three-dimensional quality of the surface, and the identification of specific landforms
[...More...]

"Topographical" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Water Table
The water table is the upper surface of the zone of saturation. The zone of saturation is where the pores and fractures of the ground are saturated with water.[1] The water table is the surface where the water pressure head is equal to the atmospheric pressure (where gauge pressure = 0). It may be visualized as the "surface" of the subsurface materials that are saturated with groundwater in a given vicinity.[2] The groundwater may be from precipitation or from groundwater flowing into the aquifer. In areas with sufficient precipitation, water infiltrates through pore spaces in the soil, passing through the unsaturated zone. At increasing depths, water fills in more of the pore spaces in the soils, until a zone of saturation is reached. Below the water table, in the phreatic zone (zone of saturation), layers of permeable rock that yield groundwater are called aquifers
[...More...]

"Water Table" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Semi-arid
A semi-arid climate or steppe climate is the climate of a region that receives precipitation below potential evapotranspiration, but not as low as a desert climate. There are different kinds of semi-arid climates, depending on variables such as temperature, and they give rise to different biomes.Regions with semi-arid climates   BSh   BSkContents1 Defining attributes of semi-arid climates 2 Hot semi-arid climates 3 Cold semi-arid climates 4 Regions of varying classification 5 Charts of selected cities 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksDefining attributes of semi-arid climates[edit] A more precise definition is given by the Köppen climate classification, which treats steppe climates (BSk and BSh) as intermediates between desert climates (BW) and humid climates in ecological characteristics and agricultural potential
[...More...]

"Semi-arid" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Arid
A region is arid when it is characterized by a severe lack of available water, to the extent of hindering or preventing the growth and development of plant and animal life. Environments subject to arid climates tend to lack vegetation and are called xeric or desertic. Most "arid" climates surround the equator; these places include most of Africa
Africa
and parts of South America, Central America
Central America
and Australia. Change over time[edit]This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it. (January 2008)The distribution of aridity observed at any one point in time is largely the result of the general circulation of the atmosphere. The latter does change significantly over time through climate change. For example, temperature increase (by 1.5–2.1 percent) across the Nile Basin over the next 30–40 years could change the region from semi-arid to arid, resulting in a significant reduction in agricultural land
[...More...]

"Arid" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Segmented Regression
Segmented regression, also known as piecewise regression or "broken-stick regression", is a method in regression analysis in which the independent variable is partitioned into intervals and a separate line segment is fit to each interval. Segmented regression
Segmented regression
analysis can also be performed on multivariate data by partitioning the various independent variables. Segmented regression
Segmented regression
is useful when the independent variables, clustered into different groups, exhibit different relationships between the variables in these regions
[...More...]

"Segmented Regression" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Australia (continent)
List of cities in Australia
Australia
by population List of cities and towns in Papua New Guinea
Papua New Guinea
by populationListSydney Melbourne Brisbane Perth Adelaide Gold Coast-Tweed Newcastle Canberra-Queanbeyan Wollongong Port Moresby Jayapura ManokwariAustralia, sometimes known in technical contexts by the names Sahul, Australinea or Meganesia, to distinguish it from the Australian mainland, is a continent comprising mainland Australia, Tasmania, New Guinea, New Britain, and small neighbouring islands (such as Misool and Waigeo, just to the northeast of Maluku Islands
Maluku Islands
at the edge of its continental shelf). Situated in the geographical region of Oceania, it is the smallest of the seven traditional continents in the English conception
[...More...]

"Australia (continent)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cotton
Cotton
Cotton
is a soft, fluffy staple fiber that grows in a boll, or protective case, around the seeds of the cotton plants of the genus Gossypium
Gossypium
in the mallow family Malvaceae. The fiber is almost pure cellulose. Under natural conditions, the cotton bolls will increase the dispersal of the seeds. The plant is a shrub native to tropical and subtropical regions around the world, including the Americas, Africa, and India. The greatest diversity of wild cotton species is found in Mexico, followed by Australia
Australia
and Africa.[1] Cotton
Cotton
was independently domesticated in the Old and New Worlds. The fiber is most often spun into yarn or thread and used to make a soft, breathable textile
[...More...]

"Cotton" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sugarcane
Sugarcane, or sugar cane, are several species of tall perennial true grasses of the genus Saccharum, tribe Andropogoneae, native to the warm temperate to tropical regions of South Asia
South Asia
and Melanesia, and used for sugar production. It has stout, jointed, fibrous stalks that are rich in the sugar sucrose, which accumulates in the stalk internodes. The plant is two to six meters (six to twenty feet) tall. All sugar cane species interbreed and the major commercial cultivars are complex hybrids[1]. Sugarcane
Sugarcane
belongs to the grass family Poaceae, an economically important seed plant family that includes maize, wheat, rice, and sorghum, and many forage crops. Sucrose, extracted and purified in specialized mill factories, is used as raw material in the food industry or is fermented to produce ethanol. Ethanol
Ethanol
is produced on a large scale by the Brazilian sugarcane industry
[...More...]

"Sugarcane" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Wheat
References:   Serial No. 42236 ITIS 2002-09-22 Wheat
Wheat
is a grass widely cultivated for its seed, a cereal grain which is a worldwide staple food.[1][2][3] There are many species of wheat which together make up the genus Triticum; the most widely grown is common wheat (T. aestivum). The archaeological record suggests that wheat was first cultivated in the regions of the Fertile Crescent
Fertile Crescent
around 9600 BCE
[...More...]

"Wheat" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Indo-Gangetic Plain
In geography, a plain is a flat, sweeping landmass that generally does not change much in elevation. Plains occur as lowlands along the bottoms of valleys or on the doorsteps of mountains, as coastal plains, and as plateaus or uplands.[1] In a valley, a plain is enclosed on two sides but in other cases a plain may be delineated by a complete or partial ring of hills, by mountains or cliffs. Where a geological region contains more than one plain, they may be connected by a pass (sometimes termed a gap). Coastal plains would mostly rise from sea level until they run into elevated features such as mountains or plateaus.[2] Plains are one of the major landforms on earth, where they are present on all continents, and would cover more than one-third of the world’s land area.[3] Plains may have been formed from flowing lava, deposited by water, ice, wind, or formed by erosion by these agents from hills and mountains
[...More...]

"Indo-Gangetic Plain" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.