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Softball
Softball
Softball
is a variant of baseball played with a larger ball on a smaller field. It was invented in 1887 in Chicago, Illinois, United States as an indoor game. It was at various times called indoor baseball, mush ball, playground, softball, kitten ball, and because it was also played by women, ladies' baseball. The name softball was given to the game in 1926, because the ball used to be soft. A tournament held in 1933 at the Chicago
Chicago
World's Fair spurred interest in the game. The Amateur Softball Association
Amateur Softball Association
(ASA) of America (founded 1933) governs the game in the United States
United States
and sponsors annual sectional and World Series championships
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Baseball Park
A baseball park, also known as a ballpark or diamond, is a venue where baseball is played. A baseball park consists of the playing field and the surrounding spectator seating. While the diamond and the areas denoted by white painted lines adhere to strict rules, guidelines for the rest of the field are flexible. The term "ballpark" sometimes refers either to the entire structure, or sometimes to just the playing field. A home run where the player makes it around the bases, and back to home plate, without the ball leaving the playing field is typically called an "inside-the-park" home run. Sometimes a home run ball passing over an outfield fence (when hit by a batter) is said to have been hit "out of the ballpark," but that phrase more often refers to a home run ball that cleared the stands, landing outside the building
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Harvard
Harvard University
Harvard University
is a private Ivy League
Ivy League
research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Established in 1636 and named for clergyman John Harvard (its first benefactor), its history, influence, and wealth have made it one of the world's most prestigious universities.[8] Harvard is the United States' oldest institution of higher learning,[9] and the Harvard Corporation
Harvard Corporation
(formally, the President and Fellows of Harvard College) is its first chartered corporation. Although never formally affiliated with any denomination, the early College primarily trained Congregational and Unitarian clergy. Its curriculum and student body were gradually secularized during the 18th century, and by the 19th century, Harvard had emerged as the central cultural establishment among Boston elites.[10][11] Following the American Civil War, President Charles W
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Out (baseball)
In baseball, an out occurs when the umpire rules a batter or baserunner out. When three outs are recorded in an inning, a team's half of the inning, or their turn at batting, ends. To signal an out, an umpire generally makes a fist with one hand, and then flexes that arm either upward, particularly on pop flies, or forward, particularly on routine plays at first base
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Umpires
A referee or simply ref is the person of authority in a variety of sports who is responsible for presiding over the game from a neutral point of view and making on-the-fly decisions that enforce the rules of the sport, including sportsmanship decisions such as ejection
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Centimeters
A centimetre (international spelling as used by the International Bureau of Weights and Measures; symbol cm) or centimeter (American spelling) is a unit of length in the metric system, equal to one hundredth of a metre, centi being the SI prefix
SI prefix
for a factor of 1/100.[1] The centimetre was the base unit of length in the now deprecated centimetre–gram–second (CGS) system of units. Though for many physical quantities, SI prefixes for factors of 103—like milli- and kilo-—are often preferred by technicians, the centimetre remains a practical unit of length for many everyday measurements
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Home Plate
A baseball field, also called a ball field or a baseball diamond, is the field upon which the game of baseball is played. The term can also be used as a metonym for a baseball park.Contents1 Specifications 2 First base 3 Second base 4 Third base 5 Home plate 6 Batter's box
Batter's box
and catcher's box 7 Foul poles 8 Pitcher's mound 9 Baseline9.1 Running baseline 9.2 Running lane10 Grass line 11 Outfield 12 Warning track 13 Outfield wall 14 Bullpen 15 On-deck
On-deck
circles 16 Coach's boxes 17 History 18 Maintenance 19 Honors and awards 20 See also 21 References 22 External linksSpecifications[edit]This section appears to contradict itself on what "the infield" means. Please see the talk page for more information
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Third Base
A third baseman, abbreviated 3B, is the player in baseball whose responsibility is to defend the area nearest to third base — the third of four bases a baserunner must touch in succession to score a run. In the scoring system used to record defensive plays, the third baseman is assigned the number '5'. The third baseman requires good reflexes in reacting to batted balls, as he or she is often the closest infielder (roughly 90–120 feet) to the batter. The third base position requires a strong and accurate arm, as the third baseman often makes long throws to first base. The third baseman sometimes must throw quickly to second base in time to start a double play. The third baseman must also field fly balls in fair and foul territory. Third base is known as the "hot corner", because the third baseman is relatively close to the batter and most right-handed hitters tend to hit the ball hard in this direction
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First Base
First base, or 1B, is the first of four stations on a baseball diamond which must be touched in succession by a baserunner to score a run for that player's team. A first baseman is the player on the team playing defense who fields the area nearest first base, and is responsible for the majority of plays made at that base. In the numbering system used to record defensive plays, the first baseman is assigned the number 3. Also called first sacker or cornerman, the first baseman is ideally a tall player who throws left-handed and possesses good flexibility and quick reflexes. Flexibility is needed because the first baseman receives throws from the other infielders, the catcher and the pitcher after they have fielded ground balls. In order for the runner to be called out, the first baseman must be able to stretch towards the throw and catch it before the runner reaches first base
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Outfield
The outfield is a sporting term used in cricket and baseball to refer to the area of the field of play further from the batsman or batter than the infield, and in association football to players outside the goal.Contents1 In cricket and baseball 2 Association football 3 See also 4 External linksIn cricket and baseball[edit] In both baseball and cricket, fielders in the outfield have more ground to cover, but also more time before the ball reaches them. Catches are most likely to arise from shots that have been 'skied' (in cricket) or 'popped ' (in baseball)
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Infield
Infield is a sports term whose definition depends on the sport in whose context it is used.Contents1 Baseball 2 Cricket 3 Tracks 4 ReferencesBaseball[edit] In baseball the baseball diamond plus a region beyond it, has both grass and dirt, in contrast to the more distant, usually grass-covered outfield. It also refers to the defensive unit of players that are positioned in the region: first baseman, second baseman, shortstop, third baseman
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Singapore
Singapore
Singapore
(/ˈsɪŋ(ɡ)əpɔːr/ ( listen)), officially the Republic
Republic
of Singapore, is a sovereign city-state and island country in Southeast Asia. It lies one degree (137 kilometres or 85 miles) north of the equator, at the southern tip of the Malay Peninsula, with Indonesia's Riau Islands
Riau Islands
to the south and Peninsular Malaysia
Peninsular Malaysia
to the north. Singapore's territory consists of one main island along with 62 other islets
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1933 World's Fair
Ibero-American Exposition of 1929
Ibero-American Exposition of 1929
in Sevilla
Sevilla
and 1929 Barcelona International Exposition
1929 Barcelona International Exposition
in BarcelonaNext Brussels International Exposition (1935)
Brussels International Exposition (1935)
in BrusselsA Century of Progress
Century of Progress
International Exposition was a World's Fair registered under the Bureau International des Expositions
Bureau International des Expositions
(BIE), which was held in Chicago, as The Chicago
Chicago
World's Fair, from 1933 to 1934 to celebrate the city's centennial. The theme of the fair was technological innovation. The fair's motto was "Science Finds, Industry Applies, Man Adapts"
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Young Men's Christian Association
The Young Men's Christian Association, commonly known as the YMCA
YMCA
or simply the Y, is a worldwide organization based in Geneva, Switzerland, with more than 58 million beneficiaries from 125 national associations.[1] It was founded on 6 June 1844 by George Williams in London
London
and aims to put Christian principles into practice by developing a healthy "body, mind, and spirit". These three angles are reflected by the different sides of the (red) triangle—part of all YMCA
YMCA
logos. From its inception, it grew rapidly and ultimately became a worldwide movement founded on the principles of Muscular Christianity. Local YMCAs engage in a wide variety of charitable activities, including providing athletic facilities, holding classes for a wide variety of skills, promoting Christianity, and humanitarian work
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National Register Of Historic Places
The National Register of Historic Places
National Register of Historic Places
(NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property. The passage of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) in 1966 established the National Register and the process for adding properties to it. Of the more than one million properties on the National Register, 80,000 are listed individually
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Firefighter
A firefighter (also fireman and firewoman) is a rescuer extensively trained in firefighting, primarily to extinguish hazardous fires that threaten life, property and/or the environment, as well as to rescue people (and animals) from dangerous situations. The complexity of modern, industrialized life has created an increase in the skills needed in firefighting technology. The fire service, also known in some countries as the fire brigade or fire department, is one of the three main emergency services. From urban areas to aboard ships, firefighters have become ubiquitous around the world.Firefighters and fire apparatus at the scene of a factory fire in Grand Rapids, Michigan.The goals of firefighting are (in order of priority):Save life Save property Save the environmentThe skills required for safe operations are regularly practiced during training evaluations throughout a firefighter's career
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