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Society Of American Indians
The Society of American Indians
Society of American Indians
(1911–1923) was the first national American Indian rights organization run by and for American Indians.[1] The Society pioneered twentieth century Pan-Indianism, the movement promoting unity among American Indians regardless of tribal affiliation. The Society was a forum for a new generation of American Indian leaders known as Red Progressives, prominent professionals from the fields of medicine, nursing, law, government, education, anthropology and ministry. They shared the enthusiasm and faith of Progressive Era
Progressive Era
white reformers in the inevitability of progress through education and governmental action. The Society met at academic institutions, maintained a Washington, D.C. headquarters, conducted annual conferences and published a quarterly journal of American Indian literature by American Indian authors
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Native Americans In The United States
American Indian and Alaska
Alaska
Native (2010 Census Bureau)[1] One race: 2,932,248 are registered In combination with one or more of the other races listed: 2,288,331 Total: 5,220,579 ~ 1.6% of the total U.S
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Osage Nation
The Osage Nation
Osage Nation
(/ˈoʊseɪdʒ/ OH-sayj) (Ni-u-kon-ska, "People of the Middle Waters") is a Midwestern Native American tribe of the Great Plains who historically dominated much of present-day Missouri, Arkansas, Kansas, and Oklahoma. The tribe developed in the Ohio
Ohio
and Mississippi
Mississippi
river valleys around 700 BC along with other groups of its language family. They migrated west of the Mississippi
Mississippi
after the 17th century due to wars with Iroquois
Iroquois
invading the Ohio
Ohio
Valley from New York and Pennsylvania in a search for new hunting grounds
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Apache
The Apache
Apache
(/əˈpætʃiː/; French: [a.paʃ]) are a group of culturally related Native American tribes in the Southwestern United States, which include the Chiricahua, Jicarilla, Lipan, Mescalero, Salinero, Plains and Western Apache. Distant cousins of the Apache
Apache
are the Navajo, with which they share the Southern Athabaskan
Athabaskan
languages. There are Apache
Apache
communities in Oklahoma, Texas, and on reservations in Arizona
Arizona
and New Mexico. Apache
Apache
people have moved throughout the United States and elsewhere, including urban centers
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Oneida People
The Oneida (Onyota'a:ka or Onayotekaonotyu, meaning the People of the Upright Stone, or standing stone, Thwahrù·nęʼ[2] in Tuscarora) are a Native American tribe and First Nations
First Nations
band. They are one of the five founding nations of the Iroquois
Iroquois
Confederacy in the area of upstate New York, particularly near the Great Lakes. The Iroquois
Iroquois
call themselves Haudenosaunee ("The people of the longhouses") in reference to their communal lifestyle and the construction style of their dwellings. Originally the Oneida inhabited the area that later became central New York, particularly around Oneida Lake
Oneida Lake
and Oneida County
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Oglala Lakota
The Oglala Lakota
Oglala Lakota
or Oglala Sioux (pronounced [oɡəˈlala], meaning "to scatter one's own" in Lakota language[5]) are one of the seven subtribes of the Lakota people
Lakota people
who, along with the Dakota, make up the Great Sioux Nation. A majority of the Oglala live on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota, the eighth-largest Native American reservation in the United States. The Oglala are a federally recognized tribe whose official title is the Oglala Sioux Tribe (previously called the Oglala Sioux Tribe of the Pine Ridge Reservation, South Dakota). Of note, however, many Oglala reject the term "Sioux" because it was a name give to them by the Chippewa Nation, who were historically enemies of the Lakota
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Seneca People
The Seneca are a group of indigenous Iroquoian-speaking people native to North America
North America
who historically lived south of Lake Ontario. They were the nation located farthest to the west within the Six Nations or Iroquois
Iroquois
League (Haudenosaunee) in New York before the American Revolution. In the 21st century, more than 10,000 Seneca live in the United States, which has three federally recognized Seneca tribes. Two are in New York: the Seneca Nation of New York, with two reservations in western New York near Buffalo; and the Tonawanda Band of Seneca
Tonawanda Band of Seneca
Native Americans
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New York State Museum
The New York State Museum
New York State Museum
is a research-backed institution in Albany, New York, United States. It is located on Madison Avenue, attached to the south side of the Empire State Plaza, facing onto the plaza and towards the New York State Capitol. The museum houses art, artifacts (prehistoric and historic), and ecofacts that reflect New York’s cultural, natural, and geological development. Operated by the New York State Education Department's Office of Cultural Education, it is the nation's oldest and largest state museum
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Chippewa
The Ojibwe, Ojibwa, or Chippewa are an Anishinaabeg
Anishinaabeg
group of Indigenous Peoples in North America, known among many Indigenous peoples as Turtle Island. They live in Canada
Canada
and the United States and are one of the largest Indigenous ethnic groups north of the Rio Grande. In Canada, they are the second-largest First Nations population, surpassed only by the Cree. In the United States, they have the fifth-largest population among Native American tribes, surpassed only by the Navajo, Cherokee, Choctaw
Choctaw
and Lakota-Dakota-Nakota people. The Ojibwe
Ojibwe
people traditionally have spoken the Ojibwe
Ojibwe
language, a branch of the Algonquian language family
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Blackfoot
The Blackfoot
Blackfoot
Confederacy, Niitsitapi or Siksikaitsitapi[1] (ᖹᐟᒧᐧᒣᑯ, meaning "the people" or "Blackfoot-speaking real people"[note 1]) is a historic collective name for the four bands that make up the Blackfoot
Blackfoot
or Blackfeet people: three First Nation band governments in the provinces of Saskatchewan, Alberta, and British Columbia, and one Native American tribe in Montana, United States
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Chickasaw
The Chickasaw
Chickasaw
(/ˈtʃɪkəsɔː/ CHIK-ə-saw) are an indigenous people of the Southeastern Woodlands. Their traditional territory was in the Southeastern United States
United States
of Mississippi, Alabama, and Tennessee.[2] They are of the Muskogean
Muskogean
language family and are federally recognized as the Chickasaw
Chickasaw
Nation. Sometime prior to the first European contact, the Chickasaw
Chickasaw
migrated from western regions and moved east of the Mississippi
Mississippi
River, where they settled mostly in present-day northeast Mississippi
Mississippi
and into Lawrence County, Tennessee.[3] That is where they encountered European explorers and traders, having relationships with French, English and Spanish during the colonial years
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Santee Dakota
The Dakota people
Dakota people
are a Native American tribe and First Nations
First Nations
band government in North America. They compose two of the three main subcultures of the Sioux
Sioux
/ˈsuː/ people, and are typically divided into the Eastern Dakota and the Western Dakota. The Eastern Dakota are the Santee (Isáŋyathi or Isáŋ-athi; "knife" + "encampment", ″dwells at the place of knife flint″), who reside in the eastern Dakotas, central Minnesota
Minnesota
and northern Iowa. They have federally recognized tribes established in several places. The Western Dakota are the Yankton, and the Yanktonai (Iháŋktȟuŋwaŋ and Iháŋktȟuŋwaŋna; "Village-at-the-end" and "Little village-at-the-end"), who reside in the Upper Missouri River area. The Yankton-Yanktonai are collectively also referred to by the endonym Wičhíyena (″Those Who Speak Like Men″)
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Cherokee
316,049 enrolled tribal members (Eastern Band: 13,000+, Cherokee
Cherokee
Nation: 288,749, United Keetoowah Band: 14,300)[1] 819,105 claimed Cherokee
Cherokee
ancestry in the 2010 Census[2]Regions with significant populations United States North Carolina
North Carolina
16,158 (0.2%)[3][3]   Oklahoma
Oklahoma
102,580 (2.7%)[3]LanguagesEnglish, CherokeeReligionChristianity, Kituhwa, Four Mothers Society,[4] Native American Church[5]This article contains Cherokee
Cherokee
syllabic characters
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Pottawatomie
The Pottawatomi /ˌpɑːtəˈwɑːtəmiː/,[1] also spelled Pottawatomie and Potawatomi
Potawatomi
(among many variations), are a Native American people of the Great Plains, upper Mississippi River
Mississippi River
and Western Great Lakes
Great Lakes
region. They traditionally speak the Potawatomi language, a member of the Algonquian family. The Potawatomi
Potawatomi
called themselves Neshnabé, a cognate of the word Anishinaabe. The Potawatomi
Potawatomi
were part of a long-term alliance, called the Council of Three Fires, with the Ojibwe
Ojibwe
and Odawa (Ottawa)
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Tuscarora People
The Tuscarora (in Tuscarora Skarù:ręˀ, "hemp gatherers"[2] or "Shirt-Wearing People"[3]) are a Native American tribe and First Nations band government of the Iroquoian-language family, with members today in North Carolina, New York, and Ontario.[3] They coalesced as a people around the Great Lakes, likely about the same time as the rise of the Five Nations of the historic Iroquois
Iroquois
Confederacy, also Iroquoian-speaking and based then in present-day New York. Well before the arrival of Europeans in North America, the Tuscarora had migrated south and settled in the region now known as Eastern Carolina
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Winnebago (tribe)
The Ho-Chunk, also known as Hoocąągra or Winnebago, are a Siouan-speaking Native American people whose historic territory includes parts of Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, and Illinois. Today, Ho-Chunk
Ho-Chunk
people are enrolled in two federally recognized tribes, the Ho-Chunk
Ho-Chunk
Nation of Wisconsin
Wisconsin
and the Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska. The Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska
Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska
have an Indian reservation
Indian reservation
in Nebraska. While related, the two tribes are distinct federally recognized sovereign nations and peoples, each having its own constitutionally formed government, and completely separate governing and business interests. Since the late 20th century, both tribal councils have authorized the development of casinos to generate revenue to support economic development, infrastructure, health care and education
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