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Societas Europaea
A societas Europaea (Latin pronunciation: [soˈki.e.taːs ew.roːˈpae.a] SE; Latin: European society or company; plural: societates Europaeae) is a public company registered in accordance with the corporate law of the European Union
European Union
(EU), introduced in 2004 with the Council Regulation on the Statute for a European Company.[2] Such a company may more easily transfer to or merge with companies in other member states. 2,943 registrations have been reported as of 6 February 2018, including the following nine components (18%) of the Euro Stoxx 50 stock market index of leading Euro Area
Euro Area
companies (excluding the SE designation): Airbus, Allianz, BASF, E.ON, Fresenius, LVMH
LVMH
Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton, SAP, Schneider Electric
Schneider Electric
and Unibail-Rodamco.[3][4] National law continues to supplement the basic rules in the Regulation on formation and mergers
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Anguillan Company Law
Anguillan company law is primarily codified in three principal statutes:the International Business Companies Act (Cap I.20);[1] the Companies Act (Cap C.65); and the Limited Liability Companies Act (Cap L.65).The Companies Act is generally reserved for companies which engaged in business physically in Anguilla, and companies formed under it are generally referred to as either "CACs" (an acronym for Companies Act Companies) or "ABCs" (an acronym for Anguillan Business Company)
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Stock Market Index
A stock index or stock market index is a measurement of a section of the stock market. It is computed from the prices of selected stocks (typically a weighted average). It is a tool used by investors and financial managers to describe the market, and to compare the return on specific investments. Two of the primary criteria of an index are that it is investable and transparent [1]: the method of its construction should be clear. Many mutual funds and exchange-traded funds attempt to "track" an index (see index fund) with varying degrees of success
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British Virgin Islands Company Law
British Virgin Islands
British Virgin Islands
company law is primarily codified in the BVI Business Companies Act, 2004, and to a lesser extent by the Insolvency Act, 2003 and the Securities and Investment Business Act, 2010. The British Virgin Islands
British Virgin Islands
has approximately 30 registered companies per head of population, which is probably the highest ratio of any country in the world. Annual company registration fees provide a significant part of Government revenue in the British Virgin Islands, which accounts for the comparative lack of other taxation
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Chanel Iman
Chanel Iman
Chanel Iman
Robinson Shepard (born December 1, 1990)[1] is an American model, known professionally as Chanel Iman.[4] She is best known for her work as a Victoria's Secret
Victoria's Secret
Angel. Vogue Paris
Vogue Paris
declared her as one of the top 30 models of the 2000s.[5]Contents1 Early life 2 Career2.1 Modeling 2.2 Television 2.3 Acting3 Other projects3.1 Ventures 3.2 Activism4 Personal life 5 References 6 External linksEarly life[edit] Iman was born in Atlanta, Georgia
Atlanta, Georgia
in 1990. She grew up in Los Angeles, California
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Corporate Law In The United States
United States corporate law
United States corporate law
regulates the governance, finance and power of corporations in US law. Every state and territory has its own basic corporate code, while federal law creates minimum standards for trade in company shares and governance rights, found mostly in the Securities Act of 1933
Securities Act of 1933
and the Securities and Exchange Act
Securities and Exchange Act
of 1934, as amended by laws like the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
and the Dodd-Frank Act of 2010. The US Constitution
US Constitution
was interpreted by the US Supreme Court to allow corporations to incorporate in the state of their choice, regardless of where their headquarters are
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Board Of Directors
A board of directors is a group of people who jointly supervise the activities of an organization, which can be either a for-profit business, nonprofit organization, or a government agency. Such a board's powers, duties, and responsibilities are determined by government regulations (including the jurisdiction's corporations law) and the organization's own constitution and bylaws. These authorities may specify the number of members of the board, how they are to be chosen, and how often they are to meet. In an organization with voting members, the board is accountable to, and might be subordinate to, the organization's full membership, which usually vote for the members of the board. In a stock corporation, non-executive directors are voted for by the shareholders, with the board having ultimate responsibility for the management of the corporation. The board of directors appoints the chief executive officer of the corporation and sets out the overall strategic direction
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Employee Involvement Directive
The Employee Involvement Directive 2001/86/EC is an EU Directive concerning the right of workers to elect members of the board of directors in a European Company. It is a supplement to the European Company Regulation.Contents1 Content1.1 Definition 1.2 Participation 1.3 Employment contracts and pensions2 See also 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksContent[edit] EU member states differ in the degree of worker involvement in corporate management. In Germany, most large corporations are required to allow employees to elect a certain percentage of seats on the supervisory board. Other member states, such as the UK, have no such requirement, and furthermore in these states such practices are largely unknown and considered a threat to the rights of management. These differing traditions of worker involvement have held back the adoption of the Statute for over a decade
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Holding Company
A holding company is a company that owns other companies' outstanding stock. A holding company usually does not produce goods or services itself; rather, its purpose is to own shares of other companies to form a corporate group. Holding companies allow the reduction of risk for the owners and can allow the ownership and control of a number of different companies. In the United States, 80% of stock, in voting and value, must be owned before tax consolidation benefits such as tax-free dividends can be claimed.[1] That is, if Company A owns 80% or more of the stock of Company B, Company A will not pay taxes on dividends paid by Company B to its stockholders, as the payment of dividends from B to A is essentially transferring cash from one company to the other
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Cayman Islands Company Law
Cayman Islands
Cayman Islands
company law is primarily codified in the Companies Law (2016 Revision) and the Limited Liability Companies Law, 2016,[1] and to a lesser extent in the Securities and Investment Business Law (2015 Revision). The Cayman Islands
Cayman Islands
is a leading Offshore Financial Centre, and financial services forms a significant part of the economy of the Cayman Islands
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Airbus A380
The Airbus
Airbus
A380 is a double-deck, wide-body, four-engine jet airliner manufactured by European manufacturer Airbus.[6][7] It is the world's largest passenger airliner, and the airports at which it operates have upgraded facilities to accommodate it. It was initially named Airbus A3XX and designed to challenge Boeing's monopoly in the large-aircraft market. The A380 made its first flight on 27 April 2005 and entered commercial service on 25 October 2007 with Singapore Airlines. An improved version, the A380plus, is under development. The A380's upper deck extends along the entire length of the fuselage, with a width equivalent to a wide-body aircraft. This gives the A380-800's cabin 550 square metres (5,920 sq ft) of usable floor space,[8] 40% more than the next largest airliner, the Boeing 747-8,[9] and provides seating for 525 people in a typical three-class configuration or up to 853 people in an all-economy class configuration
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Moët & Chandon
Moët & Chandon (French pronunciation: ​[moɛt‿e ʃɑ̃.dɔ̃]),[1] or Moët, is a French fine winery and co-owner of the luxury goods company LVMH
LVMH
Moët Hennessy
Hennessy
Louis Vuitton
Louis Vuitton
SE. Moët et Chandon is one of the world's largest champagne producers and a prominent champagne house
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Latin Language
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in the area around Rome, known as Latium.[4] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language in Italy, and subsequently throughout the western Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, French, Portuguese, Romanian, and Spanish. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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General Partnership
A general partnership, the basic form of partnership under common law, is in most countries an association of persons or an unincorporated company with the following major features:Must be created by agreement, proof of existence and estoppel. Formed by two or more persons The owners are jointly and severally liable for any legal actions and debts the company may face, unless otherwise provided by law or in the agreement.It is a partnership in which partners share equally in both responsibility and liability.[1]Contents1 Characteristics 2 Separate legal personality 3 See also 4 ReferencesCharacteristics[edit] Partnerships have certain default characteristics relating to both (a) the relationship between the individual partners and (b) the relationship between the partnership and the outside world
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Corporate Law In Vietnam
Corporate law
Corporate law
in Vietnam
Vietnam
was originally based on the French commercial law system. However, since Vietnam's independence in 1945, it has largely been influenced by the ruling Communist Party
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Canadian Corporate Law
Canadian company law concerns the operation of corporations in Canada, which can be established under either federal or provincial authority. Federal incorporation of for-profit corporations is governed by Corporations
Corporations
Canada
Canada
under the Canada
Canada
Business Corporations
Corporations
Act. All of the Canadian provinces and territories also have laws permitting (and governing) the incorporation of corporations within their area of jurisdiction
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