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Social History Of England
English society
English society
is the group behaviour of the English, how they organise themselves and make collective decisions. This article deals with the span from the emergence of the English nation to contemporary social questions in the country. The social history of England
England
evidences many social changes over the centuries. These major social changes have both internally and in its relationship with other nations. The themes of social history include demographic history, labour history and the working class, women's history, family history, the history of education in England, urban history and rural and agricultural history
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History Of East Sussex
East Sussex is a county in South East England. It is bordered by the counties of Kent to the north and east, Surrey to the north west and West Sussex to the west, and to the south by the English Channel.Contents1 History 2 Governance 3 Geography3.1 Geology 3.2 Climate 3.3 Relief and drainage 3.4 Settlements4 Economy and demography 5 Politics 6 Landmarks 7 Transport7.1 Roads 7.2 Railways 7.3 Footpaths8 Education 9 See also 10 References 11 External linksHistory[edit] Main article: History of Sussex East Sussex is part of the historic county of Sussex, which has its roots in the ancient kingdom of the South Saxons, who established themselves there in the 5th century AD, after the departure of the Romans. Archaeological remains are plentiful, especially in the upland areas. The area's position on the coast has also meant that there were many invaders, including the Romans and later the Normans
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The Protectorate
The Protectorate was the period during the Commonwealth (or, to monarchists, the Interregnum) when England and Wales, Ireland
Ireland
and Scotland
Scotland
were governed by a Lord Protector
Lord Protector
as a republic. The Protectorate began in 1653 when, following the dissolution of the Rump Parliament and then Barebone's Parliament, Oliver Cromwell
Oliver Cromwell
was appointed Lord Protector
Lord Protector
of the Commonwealth under the terms of the Instrument of Government. In 1659 the Protectorate Parliament was dissolved by the Committee of Safety as Richard Cromwell, who had succeeded his father as Lord Protector, was unable to keep control of the Parliament and the Army
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Regency Era
The Regency in Great Britain was a period when King George III
George III
was deemed unfit to rule and his son ruled as his proxy as Prince Regent. On the death of George III
George III
in 1820, the Prince Regent
Regent
became George IV. The term Regency (or Regency era) can refer to various stretches of time; some are longer than the decade of the formal Regency which lasted from 1811–1820. The period from 1795 to 1837, which includes the latter part of the reign of George III
George III
and the reigns of his sons George IV and William IV, is sometimes regarded as the Regency era, characterised by distinctive trends in British architecture, literature, fashions, politics, and culture
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English Renaissance
The English Renaissance
Renaissance
was a cultural and artistic movement in England dating from the late 15th century to the early 17th century. It is associated with the pan-European Renaissance
Renaissance
that is usually regarded as beginning in Italy in the late 14th century. As in most of the rest of northern Europe, England saw little of these developments until more than a century later. The beginning of the English Renaissance
Renaissance
is often taken, as a convenience, to be 1485, when the Battle of Bosworth
Battle of Bosworth
Field ended the Wars of the Roses
Wars of the Roses
and inaugurated the Tudor Dynasty
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Timeline Of English History
This is a timeline of English history, comprising important legal and territorial changes and political events in England
England
and its predecessor states. To read about the background to these events, see History of England. This is a dynamic list and may never be able to satisfy particular standards for completeness
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Tudor Dynasty
The House of Tudor
House of Tudor
was an English royal house of Welsh origin,[1] descended in the male line from the Tudors of Penmynydd. Tudor monarchs ruled the Kingdom of England
Kingdom of England
and its realms, including their ancestral Wales
Wales
and the Lordship of Ireland
Lordship of Ireland
(later the Kingdom of Ireland) from 1485 until 1603, with five monarchs in that period. The Tudors succeeded the House of Plantagenet
House of Plantagenet
as rulers of the Kingdom of England, and were succeeded by the House of Stuart. The first Tudor monarch, Henry VII, descended through his mother from a legitimised branch of the English royal House of Lancaster
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History Of Education In England
The history of education in England is documented from Saxon settlement of England, and the setting up of the first cathedral schools in 597 and 604. Before then education was an oral affair, or followed the Roman model in diaspora and integrated families.[1] During the Middle Ages, schools were established to teach Latin grammar to the sons of the aristocracy. Two universities were established in affiliation with the church: the University of Oxford, followed by the University of Cambridge, to assist in training the clergy. A reformed system of "free grammar schools" was established in the reign of Edward VI
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English Overseas Possessions
The English overseas possessions, also known as the English colonial empire, comprised a variety of overseas territories that were colonized, conquered, or otherwise acquired by the former Kingdom of England
England
during the centuries before the Acts of Union of 1707 between the Kingdom of England
Kingdom of England
and the Kingdom of Scotland
Kingdom of Scotland
created the Kingdom of Great Britain
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History Of The English Language
English is a West Germanic
West Germanic
language that originated from Anglo-Frisian dialects brought to Britain in the mid 5th to 7th centuries AD by Anglo-Saxon settlers from what is now northwest Germany, west Denmark and the Netherlands, displacing the Celtic languages
Celtic languages
that previously predominated. The Old English
Old English
of the Anglo-Saxon era developed into Middle English, which was spoken from the Norman Conquest
Norman Conquest
era to the late 15th century. A significant influence on the shaping of Middle English
Middle English
came from contact with the North Germanic languages
North Germanic languages
spoken by the Scandinavians who conquered and colonized parts of Britain during the 8th and 9th centuries; this contact led to much lexical borrowing and grammatical simplification
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Kingdom Of Great Britain
The Kingdom of Great Britain, officially called simply Great Britain,[1] was a sovereign state in western Europe from 1 May 1707 to 31 December 1800. The state came into being following the Treaty of Union in 1706, ratified by the Acts of Union 1707, which united the kingdoms of England
England
and Scotland
Scotland
to form a single kingdom encompassing the whole island of Great Britain
Great Britain
and its outlying islands, with the exception of the Isle of Man
Isle of Man
and the Channel Islands. It also did not include Ireland, which remained a separate realm. The unitary state was governed by a single parliament and government that was based in Westminster
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Economy Of England In The Middle Ages
The economy of England in the Middle Ages, from the Norman invasion in 1066, to the death of Henry VII in 1509, was fundamentally agricultural, though even before the invasion the market economy was important to producers.[1] Norman institutions, including serfdom, were superimposed on an existing system of open fields and mature, well-established towns involved in international trade.[2] Over the next five centuries the economy would at first grow and then suffer an acute crisis, resulting in significant political and economic change. Despite economic dislocation in urban and extraction economies, including shifts in the holders of wealth and the location of these economies, the economic output of towns and mines developed and intensified over the period.[3] By the end of the period, England had a weak government, by later standards, overseeing an economy dominated by rented farms controlled by gentry, and a thriving community of indigenous English merchants and corporations.[4]
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Sub-Roman Britain
Sub- Roman Britain
Roman Britain
is the transition period between the Roman Empire's Crisis of the Third Century
Crisis of the Third Century
around AD 235 (and the subsequent collapse and end of Roman Britain), until the start of the Early Medieval
Medieval
period. The term is derived from an archaeological label for the material culture of Great Britain
Great Britain
in Late Antiquity. The term Post- Roman Britain
Roman Britain
is also used for the period, mainly in non-archaeological contexts. The term "sub-Roman" was originally used to describe archaeological remains such as potsherds found in sites of the 5th and 6th centuries, and hinted at the decay of locally-made wares from a previous higher standard that had existed under the Roman Empire
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Roman Britain
Roman Britain
Roman Britain
(Latin: Britannia
Britannia
or, later, Britanniae, "the Britains") was the area of the island of Great Britain
Great Britain
that was governed by the Roman Empire, from 43 to 410 AD.[1]:129–131[2]
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History Of Durham
County Durham (/ˈdʌrəm/, locally /ˈdɜːrəm/) is a county[N 1] in North East England.[2] The county town is Durham, a cathedral city. The largest settlement is Darlington, closely followed by Hartlepool and Stockton-on-Tees. It borders Tyne and Wear to the north east, Northumberland to the north, Cumbria to the west and North Yorkshire to the south.[3] The county's historic boundaries stretch between the rivers Tyne and Tees, and so includes places such as Gateshead, Jarrow, South Shields and Sunderland. During the Middle Ages the county was an ecclesiastical centre; this was mainly due to the shrine of St Cuthbert being in Durham Cathedral, and the extensive powers granted to the Bishop of Durham as ruler of the County Palatine of Durham. The county has a mixture of mining and farming heritage, as well as a heavy railway industry, particularly in the southeast of the county in Darlington, Shildon and Stockton
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United Kingdom
The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(UK) or Britain, is a sovereign country in western Europe
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