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Social Dance
Social dance
Social dance
is that category of dances that have a social function and context.[1] Social dances are generally intended for participation rather than performance and can be led and followed with relative ease.[2] They are often danced merely to socialise and for entertainment, though they may have ceremonial, competitive and erotic functions. Many social dances of European origin are partner dances (see Ballroom dance) but this is quite rare elsewhere, where there may be instead be circle dances or line dances, perhaps reserved for those of a certain age, sex or social position.Contents1 Social dance
Social dance
in the west1.1 20th century America2 See also 3 References 4 Further reading Social dance
Social dance
in the west[edit]Eighteenth-century social dance
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Rock 'n' Roll
Rock and roll
Rock and roll
(often written as rock & roll or rock 'n' roll) is a genre of popular music that originated and evolved in the United States during the late 1940s and early 1950s,[1][2] from African American musical styles such as gospel, jump blues, jazz, boogie woogie, and rhythm and blues,[3] along with country music.[4] While elements of rock and roll can be heard in blues records from the 1920s[5] and in country records of the 1930s,[4] the genre did not acquire its name until 1954.[6][7] According to Greg Kot, "rock and roll" refers to a style of popular music originating in the U.S
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Florence
Florence
Florence
(/ˈflɒrəns/ FLORR-ənss; Italian: Firenze [fiˈrɛntse] ( listen))[2] is the capital city of the Italian region of Tuscany. It is the most populous city in Tuscany, with 383,083 inhabitants in 2013, and over 1,520,000 in its metropolitan area.[3] Florence
Florence
was a centre of medieval European trade and finance and one of the wealthiest cities of that era.[4] It is considered the birthplace of the Renaissance, and has been called "the Athens
Athens
of the Middle Ages".[5] A turbulent political history includes periods of rule by the powerful Medici family and numerous religious and republican revolutions.[6] From 1865 to 1871 the city was the capital of the recently established Kingdom of Italy
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Gavotte
The gavotte (also gavot, gavote, or gavotta) is a French dance, taking its name from a folk dance of the Gavot, the people of the Pays de Gap region of Dauphiné
Dauphiné
in the southeast of France, where the dance originated according to one source.[1] According to another reference, however, the word "gavotte" is a generic term for a variety of French folk dances, and most likely originated in Lower Brittany
Lower Brittany
in the west, or possibly Provence
Provence
in the southeast or the French Basque Country
French Basque Country
in the southwest of France. It is notated in 4 4 or 2 2 time and is usually of moderate tempo, though the folk dances also use meters such as 9 8 and 5 8.[2] In late 16th-century renaissance dance the gavotte is first mentioned as the last of a suite of branles. Popular at the court of Louis XIV, it became one of many optional dances in the classical suite of dances
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Branle
A branle (/ˈbrænəl/ or /ˈbrɑːl/; French pronunciation: ​[bʁɑ̃l])—also bransle, brangle, brawl, brawle, brall(e), braul(e), brando (Italy), bran (Spain), or brantle (Scotland)—is a type of French dance popular from the early 16th century to the present, danced by couples in either a line or a circle
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Thoinot Arbeau
Thoinot Arbeau is the anagrammatic pen name of French cleric Jehan Tabourot (March 17, 1519 – July 23, 1595). Tabourot is most famous for his Orchésographie, a study of late sixteenth-century French Renaissance social dance. He was born in Dijon
Dijon
and died in Langres. Orchésographie and other work[edit] Orchésographie, first published in Langres, 1589,[1] provides information on social ballroom behaviour and on the interaction of musicians and dancers. It is available online in facsimile and in plain text. There is an English translation by Mary Stewart Evans, edited by Julia Sutton, in print with Dover Publications
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Canario
José Alberto Justiniano born December 22, 1958 in Villa Consuelo, Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, better known by his stage name José Alberto "El Canario" is a Dominican salsa singer. José Alberto moved to Puerto Rico with his family at the age of 7, and inspired by Latin music went on to polish his singing at Las Antillas Military Academy. He relocated to New York in the early 1970s and sang with several orchestras. He received international attention as the singer [1] of Tipica 73 in October 1977. Career[edit] José Alberto started his own band in 1983, and became a major Latin star after the release of his 1984 debut Noches Calientes. His 1991 album Dance With Me, which established a new style of salsa called salsa romántica
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Pavan (dance)
The pavane, pavan, paven, pavin, pavian, pavine, or pavyn (It. pavana, padovana; Ger. Paduana) is a slow processional dance common in Europe during the 16th century (Renaissance). The pavane, the earliest-known music for which was published in Venice by Ottaviano Petrucci, in Joan Ambrosio Dalza's Intabolatura de lauto libro quarto in 1508, is a sedate and dignified couple dance, similar to the 15th-century basse danse. The music which accompanied it appears originally to have been fast or moderately fast but, like many other dances, became slower over time (Brown 2001).Contents1 Origin of term 2 History 3 Music 4 Dance 5 Modern use 6 Notes 7 ReferencesOrigin of term[edit] The word "Pavane" is most probably derived from Italian "[danza] Padovana" (En
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Late Renaissance
Mannerism, also known as Late Renaissance,[1] is a style in European art that emerged in the later years of the Italian High Renaissance around 1520 and lasted until about end of the 16th century in Italy, when the Baroque style began to replace it. Northern Mannerism continued into the early 17th century.[2] Stylistically, Mannerism encompasses a variety of approaches influenced by, and reacting to, the harmonious ideals associated with artists such as Leonardo da Vinci, Raphael, and early Michelangelo. Where High Renaissance art emphasizes proportion, balance, and ideal beauty, Mannerism exaggerates such qualities, often resulting in compositions that are asymmetrical or unnaturally elegant.[3] The style is notable for its intellectual sophistication as well as its artificial (as opposed to naturalistic) qualities.[4] It favors compositional tension and instability rather than the balance and clarity of earlier Renaissance painting
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Choreography
Choreography
Choreography
is the art or practice of designing sequences of movements of physical bodies (or their depictions) in which motion, form, or both are specified. Choreography
Choreography
may also refer to the design itself. A choreographer is one who creates choreographies by practicing the art of choreography, a process known as choreographing. Choreography
Choreography
is used in a variety of fields, including musical theater, cheerleading, cinematography, gymnastics, fashion shows, ice skating, marching band, show choir, theatre, synchronized swimming, cardistry, video game production and animated art. In the performing arts, choreography applies to human movement and form
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Dance (other)
Disambiguation usually refers to word-sense disambiguation, the process of identifying which meaning of a word is used in context. Disambiguation may also refer to:Sentence boundary disambiguation, the problem in natural language processing of deciding where sentences begin and end Syntactic disambiguation, the problem of resolving syntactic ambiguity Memory disambiguation, a set of microprocessor execution techniquesMusic[edit]Ø (Disambiguation), a 2010 album by Underoath Disambiguation (Pandelis Karayorgis album), a 2002 album by Pandelis Karayorgis and Mat ManeriSee also[edit]Ambiguity, an attribute of any concept, idea, statement or claim whose meaning, intention or interpretation cannot be definitively resolvedThis disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Disambiguation. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the
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French Revolution
The French Revolution
Revolution
(French: Révolution française [ʁevɔlysjɔ̃ fʁɑ̃sɛːz]) was a period of far-reaching social and political upheaval in France
France
and its colonies that lasted from 1789 until 1799. It was partially carried forward by Napoleon
Napoleon
during the later expansion of the French Empire. The Revolution
Revolution
overthrew the monarchy, established a republic, catalyzed violent periods of political turmoil, and finally culminated in a dictatorship under Napoleon
Napoleon
who brought many of its principles to areas he conquered in Western Europe and beyond
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Stampita
The estampie (French: estampie, Occitan and Catalan: estampida, Italian: istampitte) is a medieval dance and musical form which was a popular instrumental and vocal form in the 13th and 14th centuries. The name was also applied to poetry (Bellingham 2002).Contents1 Musical form 2 Dance 3 Etymology 4 Media 5 Footnotes 6 ReferencesMusical form[edit] The estampie is similar in form to the lai, consisting of a succession of repeated sections (Bellingham 2002). According to Johannes de Grocheio, there were both vocal and instrumental estampies (for which he used the Latin calque "stantipes"), which differed somewhat in form, in that the vocal estampie begins with a refrain, which is repeated at the end of each verse (Page 2012)
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Carol (music)
A carol is in Modern English a festive song, generally religious but not necessarily connected with church worship, and often with a dance-like or popular character. Today the carol is represented almost exclusively by the Christmas carol, the Advent
Advent
carol, and to a much lesser extent by the Easter carol; however, despite their present association with religion, this has not always been the case.Contents1 History 2 Modern carols 3 Notes 4 Bibliography 5 See alsoHistory[edit]Coventry CarolThe Coventry Carol, performed by the U.S. Army Band ChorusProblems playing this file? See media help.The word carol is derived from the Old French
Old French
word carole, a circle dance accompanied by singers (in turn derived from the Latin choraula)
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Ballo
The ballo was an Italian dance form during the fifteenth century, most noted for its frequent changes of tempo and meter
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