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Snake River Plain
Coordinates: 43°00′N 113°30′W / 43.000°N 113.500°W / 43.000; -113.500The Snake River
Snake River
cutting through the plain leaves many canyons and gorges, such as this one near Twin Falls, Idaho Snake River
Snake River
Plain across southern IdahoThe eastern Snake River
Snake River
Plain, image from NASA's Aqua satellite, 2008The Snake River
Snake River
Plain is a geologic feature located primarily within the U.S. state of Idaho. It stretches about 400 miles (640 km) westward from northwest of the state of Wyoming
Wyoming
to the Idaho-Oregon border. The plain is a wide, flat bow-shaped depression and covers about a quarter of Idaho
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Snake River Valley AVA
The Snake River Valley AVA
Snake River Valley AVA
is an American Viticultural Area
American Viticultural Area
that encompasses an area in Southwestern Idaho
Southwestern Idaho
and two counties in eastern Oregon
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Rocky Mountains
The Rocky Mountains, commonly known as the Rockies, are a major mountain range in western North America. The Rocky Mountains
Rocky Mountains
stretch more than 3,000 miles (4,800 km) from the northernmost part of British Columbia, in western Canada, to New Mexico, in the Southwestern United States. Within the North American Cordillera, the Rockies are somewhat distinct from the Pacific Coast Ranges
Pacific Coast Ranges
and the Cascade Range
Cascade Range
and Sierra Nevada, which all lie further to the west. The Rocky Mountains
Rocky Mountains
were initially formed from 80 million to 55 million years ago during the Laramide orogeny, in which a number of plates began to slide underneath the North American plate. The angle of subduction was shallow, resulting in a broad belt of mountains running down western North America
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Hagerman Fossil Beds National Monument
Hagerman Fossil Beds National Monument
Hagerman Fossil Beds National Monument
near Hagerman, Idaho, contains the largest concentration of Hagerman horse
Hagerman horse
fossils in North America. The fossil horses for which the monument is famous have been found in only one locale in the northern portion of the monument called the Hagerman Horse Quarry. The 4,351-acre (17.6 km2) monument is internationally significant because it protects the world's richest known fossil deposits from the late Pliocene
Pliocene
epoch, 3.5 million years ago. These plants and animals represent the last glimpse of that time that existed before the Ice Age, and the earliest appearances of modern flora and fauna
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Interbedding
In geology, interbedding occurs when beds (layers or rock) of a particular lithology lie between or alternate with beds of a different lithology.[1] For example, sedimentary rocks may be interbedded if there were sea level variations in their sedimentary depositional environment.[2] References[edit]^ UCMP glossary ucmp.berkeley.edu Retrieved on- March 2008 ^ Harper, John A.; Christopher D. Laughrey; Jaime Kostelnik; David P. Gold; Arnold G. Doden (2004-05-26). "Trenton and Black River Carbonates in the Union Furnace Area of Blair and Huntingdon Counties, Pennsylvania : Introduction". Field Trip Guidebook for the Eastern Section AAPG Annual Meeting, September 10, 2003 and the PAPG Spring Field Trip, May 26, 2004. Pennsylvania Geological Survey. Retrieved 2008-06-14. This article related to petrology is a stub
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Lithosphere
A lithosphere (Ancient Greek: λίθος [lithos] for "rocky", and σφαίρα [sphaira] for "sphere") is the rigid,[1] outermost shell of a terrestrial-type planet or natural satellite that is defined by its rigid mechanical properties. On Earth, it is composed of the crust and the portion of the upper mantle that behaves elastically on time scales of thousands of years or greater. The outermost shell of a rocky planet, the crust, is defined on the basis of its chemistry and mineralogy. The study of past and current formations of landscapes is called geomorphology.Contents1 Earth's lithosphere1.1 History of the concept 1.2 Types1.2.1 Oceanic lithosphere 1.2.2 Subducted lithosphere2 Mantle xenoliths 3 See also 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksEarth's lithosphere Earth's lithosphere includes the crust and the uppermost mantle, which constitute the hard and rigid outer layer of the Earth. The lithosphere is subdivided into tectonic plates
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Shield Volcano
A shield volcano is a type of volcano usually built almost entirely of fluid lava flows. They are named for their low profile, resembling a warrior's shield lying on the ground. This is caused by the highly fluid (low viscosity) lava they erupt which travels farther than lava erupted from stratovolcanoes. This results in the steady accumulation of broad sheets of lava, building up the shield volcano's distinctive form
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Basin And Range Province
The Basin and Range Province
Basin and Range Province
is a vast physiographic region covering much of the inland Western United States
Western United States
and northwestern Mexico. It is defined by unique basin and range topography, characterized by abrupt changes in elevation, alternating between narrow faulted mountain chains and flat arid valleys or basins. The physiography of the province is the result of tectonic extension that began around 17 million years ago in the early Miocene
Miocene
epoch. The numerous ranges within the province in the United States are collectively referred to as the " Great Basin
Great Basin
Ranges", although many are not actually in the Great Basin. Major ranges include the Snake Range, the Panamint Range, the White Mountains, the Sandia Mountains, and the Tetons
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[note 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation.[1] To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.[2]Contents1 History 2 Geodetic datum 3 Horizontal coordinates3.1 Latitude
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a digital object identifier (DOI) is a persistent identifier or handle used to identify objects uniquely, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to identify their referents uniquely
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Canada
Coordinates: 60°N 95°W / 60°N 95°W / 60; -95Canada Flag Coat of arms Motto: A Mari Usque Ad Mare  (Latin)"From Sea to Sea"Anthem: "O Canada"[a] CapitalOttawa45°24′N 75°40′W / 45.400°N 75.667°W / 45.400; -75.667Largest cityTorontoOfficial languagesEnglishFrenchEthnic groups (2016)[2] List of ethnicities 74.3% European 14.5% Asian 5.1% Indigenous 3.4% Caribbean and Latin American 2.9% African 0.2% Oceanian Religion (2011)[3] List of religions 67.2% Christianity
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British Columbia
British Columbia
British Columbia
(BC; French: Colombie-Britannique) is the westernmost province of Canada, located between the Pacific Ocean
Pacific Ocean
and the Rocky Mountains. With an estimated population of 5.071 million as of 2019[update], it is Canada's third-most populous province. The first British settlement in the area was Fort Victoria, established in 1843, which gave rise to the City of Victoria, at first the capital of the separate Colony of Vancouver
Vancouver
Island. Subsequently, on the mainland, the Colony of British Columbia (1858–1866)
Colony of British Columbia (1858–1866)
was founded by Richard Clement Moody[5] and the Royal Engineers, Columbia Detachment, in response to the Fraser Canyon
Fraser Canyon
Gold Rush
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Teton Range
The Teton Range
Teton Range
is a mountain range of the Rocky Mountains
Rocky Mountains
in North America. It extends for approximately 40 miles (64 km) in a north–south direction through the U.S. state of Wyoming, east of the Idaho
Idaho
state line
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Volcanic Plateau
A volcanic plateau is a plateau produced by volcanic activity. There are two main types: lava plateaus and pyroclastic plateaus.Contents1 Lava plateau 2 Pyroclastic plateau 3 See also 4 ReferencesLava plateau[edit]The Pajarito Plateau
Plateau
in New Mexico, USA is an example of a volcanic plateauLava plateaus are formed by highly fluid (runny) basaltic lava during numerous successive eruptions through numerous vents without violent explosions (quiet eruptions). These eruptions are quiet because of low viscosity of lava, so that it is very fluid and contains a small amount of trapped gases. The resulting sheet lava flows may be extruded from linear fissures or rifts or gigantic volcanic eruptions through multiple vents characteristic of the prehistoric era which produced giant flood basalts
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Geomorphology
Geomorphology
Geomorphology
(from Ancient Greek: γῆ, gê, "earth"; μορφή, morphḗ, "form"; and λόγος, lógos, "study") is the scientific study of the origin and evolution of topographic and bathymetric features created by physical, chemical or biological processes operating at or near the Earth's surface. Geomorphologists seek to understand why landscapes look the way they do, to understand landform history and dynamics and to predict changes through a combination of field observations, physical experiments and numerical modeling. Geomorphologists work within disciplines such as physical geography, geology, geodesy, engineering geology, archaeology and geotechnical engineering
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Yellowstone Plateau
The Yellowstone Plateau volcanic field is a geological feature found in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Wyoming. It is a popular site for tourists. The plateau developed through three volcanic cycles spanning two million years that included some of the world's largest known eruptions. Eruption of the >2,500 km2 (970 sq mi) Huckleberry Ridge Tuff
Huckleberry Ridge Tuff
about 2 million years ago created the more than 75 km (47 mi) long Island Park Caldera. The second cycle concluded with the eruption of the Mesa Falls
Mesa Falls
Tuff around 1.3 million years ago, forming the 25 km (16 mi) wide Henry's Fork Caldera at the western end of the first caldera
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