HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Sluice
A sluice (from the Dutch "sluis") is a water channel controlled at its head by a gate. A mill race, leet, flume, penstock or lade is a sluice channelling water toward a water mill. The terms sluice, sluice gate, knife gate, and slide gate are used interchangeably in the water and wastewater control industry. A sluice gate is traditionally a wood or metal barrier sliding in grooves that are set in the sides of the waterway. Sluice
Sluice
gates commonly control water levels and flow rates in rivers and canals. They are also used in wastewater treatment plants and to recover minerals in mining operations, and in watermills. Operation[edit] " Sluice
Sluice
gate" refers to a movable gate allowing water to flow under it. When a sluice is lowered, water may spill over the top, in which case the gate operates as a weir. Usually, a mechanism drives the sluice up or down
[...More...]

"Sluice" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Timber Rafting
Timber
Timber
rafting is a log transportation method in which logs are tied together into rafts and drifted or pulled across a water body or down a river. It is arguably the second cheapest method of transportation of timber, next after log driving. Both methods may be referred to as timber floating.Contents1 Historical rafting 2 Construction 3 Timber
Timber
rafting in the southeastern United States 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksHistorical rafting[edit] Unlike log driving, which was a dangerous task of floating separate logs, floaters or raftsmen could enjoy relative comfort of navigation, with cabins built on rafts, steering by means of oars and possibility to make stops
[...More...]

"Timber Rafting" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Black Sand
Black sand
Black sand
is sand that is black in color. One type of black sand is a heavy, glossy, partly magnetic mixture of usually fine sands, found as part of a placer deposit. Another type of black sand, found on beaches near a volcano, consists of tiny fragments of basalt. While some beaches are predominantly made of black sand, even other colour beaches (e.g. gold and white) can often have deposits of black sand, particularly after storms
[...More...]

"Black Sand" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gouda, South Holland
Gouda (Dutch pronunciation: [ˈɣʌu̯daː] ( listen)) is a city and municipality in the province of South Holland, Netherlands with a population of 72,338. It is famous for its Gouda cheese, stroopwafels, many grachten, smoking pipes, and its 15th-century city hall. Gouda's array of historic churches and other buildings makes it a very popular day trip destination. In the Middle Ages, a settlement was founded at the location of the current city by the Van der Goude family, who built a fortified castle alongside the banks of the Gouwe River, from which the family and the city took its name. The area, originally marshland, developed over the course of two centuries. By 1225, a canal was linked to the Gouwe and its estuary was transformed into a harbour
[...More...]

"Gouda, South Holland" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Log Driving
Log driving
Log driving
is a means of moving logs (sawn tree trunks) from a forest to sawmills and pulp mills downstream using the current of a river. It was the main transportation method of the early logging industry in Europe
Europe
and North America.[citation needed]Contents1 History 2 Popular culture 3 See also 4 Sources 5 Notes 6 External linksHistory[edit] When the first sawmills were established, they were usually small water powered facilities located near the source of timber, which might be converted to grist mills after farming became established when the forests had been cleared
[...More...]

"Log Driving" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Henley-on-Thames
Henley-on-Thames
Henley-on-Thames
/ˈhɛnliː ɒn ˈtɛmz/ ( listen) is a town and civil parish on the River Thames
River Thames
in Oxfordshire, England, 9 miles (14 km) northeast of Reading, 7 miles (11 km) west of Maidenhead
Maidenhead
and 23 miles (37 km) southeast of Oxford, near the tripoint of Oxfordshire, Berkshire
Berkshire
and Buckinghamshire. The population at the 2011 Census was 11,619.[1]Contents1 History 2 Landmarks and structures 3 Property 4 Transport 5 Well-known institutions and organisations 6 Rowing 7 Other sports 8 Notable people 9 See also 10 Media 11 References 12 Further reading 13 External linksHistory[edit] The first record of Henley is from 1179, when it is recorded that King Henry II "had bought land for the making of buildings". King John granted the manor of Benson and the town and manor of Henley to Robert Harcourt in 1199
[...More...]

"Henley-on-Thames" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sawmill
A sawmill or lumber mill is a facility where logs are cut into lumber. Before the invention of the sawmill, boards were made in various manual ways, either rived (split) and planed, hewn, or more often hand sawn by two men with a whipsaw, one above and another in a saw pit below. The earliest known mechanical mill is the Hierapolis
Hierapolis
sawmill, a Roman water-powered stone mill at Hierapolis, Asia Minor
Asia Minor
dating back to the 3rd century AD. Other water-powered mills followed and by the 11th century they were widespread in Spain and North Africa, the Middle East and Central Asia, and in the next few centuries, spread across Europe. The circular motion of the wheel was converted to a reciprocating motion at the saw blade. Generally, only the saw was powered, and the logs had to be loaded and moved by hand
[...More...]

"Sawmill" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Logging
Logging
Logging
is the cutting, skidding, on-site processing, and loading of trees or logs onto trucks[1] or skeleton cars. In forestry, the term logging is sometimes used narrowly to describe the logistics of moving wood from the stump to somewhere outside the forest, usually a sawmill or a lumber yard. In common usage, however, the term may cover a range of forestry or silviculture activities. Illegal logging
Illegal logging
refers to what in forestry might be called timber theft by the timber mafia.[2][3] It can also refer to the harvesting, transportation, purchase, or sale of timber in violation of laws
[...More...]

"Logging" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Zijlstra
Zijlstra is a West Frisian toponymic surname meaning "from the Zijl", a Middle Dutch name for a waterway. The suffix "-stra" is derived from old Germanic -sater, meaning sitter or dweller
[...More...]

"Zijlstra" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gold
Gold
Gold
is a chemical element with symbol Au (from Latin: aurum) and atomic number 79, making it one of the higher atomic number elements that occur naturally. In its purest form, it is a bright, slightly reddish yellow, dense, soft, malleable, and ductile metal. Chemically, gold is a transition metal and a group 11 element. It is one of the least reactive chemical elements and is solid under standard conditions. Gold
Gold
often occurs in free elemental (native) form, as nuggets or grains, in rocks, in veins, and in alluvial deposits. It occurs in a solid solution series with the native element silver (as electrum) and also naturally alloyed with copper and palladium
[...More...]

"Gold" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Check Valve
A check valve, clack valve, non-return valve, reflux valve, retention valve or one-way valve is a valve that normally allows fluid (liquid or gas) to flow through it in only one direction.[1] Check valves are two-port valves, meaning they have two openings in the body, one for fluid to enter and the other for fluid to leave. There are various types of check valves used in a wide variety of applications. Check valves are often part of common household items. Although they are available in a wide range of sizes and costs, check valves generally are very small, simple, or inexpensive. Check valves work automatically and most are not controlled by a person or any external control; accordingly, most do not have any valve handle or stem
[...More...]

"Check Valve" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Placer Deposit
In geology, a placer deposit or placer is an accumulation of valuable minerals formed by gravity separation from a specific source rock during sedimentary processes. The name is from the Spanish word placer, meaning "alluvial sand". Placer mining
Placer mining
is an important source of gold, and was the main technique used in the early years of many gold rushes, including the California Gold
Gold
Rush. Types of placer deposits include alluvium, eluvium, beach placers, and paleoplacers. Placer materials must be both dense and resistant to weathering processes. To accumulate in placers, mineral particles must be significantly denser than quartz (whose specific gravity is 2.65), as quartz is usually the largest component of sand or gravel. Placer environments typically contain black sand, a conspicuous shiny black mixture of iron oxides, mostly magnetite with variable amounts of ilmenite and hematite
[...More...]

"Placer Deposit" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Prospecting
Prospecting
Prospecting
is the first stage of the geological analysis (second – exploration) of a territory. It is the physical search for minerals, fossils, precious metals or mineral specimens, and is also known as fossicking. Prospecting
Prospecting
is a small-scale form of mineral exploration which is an organised, large scale effort undertaken by commercial mineral companies to find commercially viable ore deposits. Prospecting
Prospecting
is physical labour, involving traversing (traditionally on foot or on horseback), panning, sifting and outcrop investigation, looking for signs of mineralisation. In some areas a prospector must also make claims, meaning they must erect posts with the appropriate placards on all four corners of a desired land they wish to prospect and register this claim before they may take samples
[...More...]

"Prospecting" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Trommel
A trommel screen, also known as a rotary screen, is a mechanical screening machine used to separate materials, mainly in the mineral and solid-waste processing industries.[1] It consists of a perforated cylindrical drum that is normally elevated at an angle at the feed end.[2] Physical size separation is achieved as the feed material spirals down the rotating drum, where the undersized material smaller than the screen apertures passes through the screen, while the oversized material exits at the other end of the drum.[3]Figure 1 Trommel screenContents1 Summary 2 Range of application2.1 Municipal and industrial waste 2.2 Mineral processing 2.3 Other applications3 Designs available 4 Advantages and limitations over competitive processes4.1 Vibrating screen 4.2 Grizzly screen5 Construction 6 Working6.1 Roller Screen 6.2 Curved Screen 6.3 Gyratory Screen Separators7 Main process characteristics7.1 Screening rate 7.2 Sepa
[...More...]

"Trommel" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cast Iron
Cast iron
Cast iron
is a group of iron-carbon alloys with a carbon content greater than 2%.[1] Its usefulness derives from its relatively low melting temperature. The alloy constituents affect its colour when fractured: white cast iron has carbide impurities which allow cracks to pass straight through, grey cast iron has graphite flakes which deflect a passing crack and initiate countless new cracks as the material breaks, and ductile cast iron has spherical graphite "nodules" which stop the crack from further progressing. Carbon
Carbon
(C) ranging from 1.8–4 wt%, and silicon (Si) 1–3 wt% are the main alloying elements of cast iron. Iron alloys with lower carbon content (~0.8%) are known as steel. While this technically makes the Fe–C–Si system ternary, the principle of cast iron solidification can be understood from the simpler binary iron–carbon phase diagram
[...More...]

"Cast Iron" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Stainless Steel
In metallurgy, stainless steel, also known as inox steel or inox from French inoxydable (inoxidizable), is a steel alloy with a minimum of 10.5% chromium content by mass.[1] Stainless steels are notable for their corrosion resistance, which increases with increasing chromium content. Molybdenum
Molybdenum
additions increase corrosion resistance in reducing acids and against pitting attack in chloride solutions. Thus, there are numerous grades of stainless steel with varying chromium and molybdenum contents to suit the environment the alloy must endure. Thus stainless steels are used where both the strength of steel and corrosion resistance are required. Stainless steel’s resistance to corrosion and staining, low maintenance, and familiar lustre make it an ideal material for many applications
[...More...]

"Stainless Steel" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.