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Slovenian Littoral
The Slovene Littoral
Slovene Littoral
(Slovene: Primorska, pronounced [priˈmóːrska] ( listen);[1] Italian: Litorale; German: Küstenland) is one of the five traditional regions of Slovenia. Its name recalls the former Austrian Littoral
Austrian Littoral
(Avstrijsko Primorje), the Habsburg possessions on the upper Adriatic coast, of which the Slovene Littoral
Slovene Littoral
was part.Contents1 Geography 2 History 3 Gallery 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksGeography[edit] See also: Slovene Riviera The region forms the westernmost part of Slovenia, bordering with the Italian region of Friuli-Venezia Giulia
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Treaty Of Rapallo (1920)
The Treaty of Rapallo
Rapallo
was a treaty between the Kingdom of Italy
Italy
and the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes
Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes
(renamed Yugoslavia in 1929), signed to solve the dispute over some territories in the former Austrian Littoral
Austrian Littoral
in the upper Adriatic, and in Dalmatia. The treaty was signed on 12 November 1920[1] in Rapallo, near Genoa, Italy
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Austrian Empire
The Austrian Empire
Empire
(Austrian German: Kaiserthum Oesterreich, modern spelling Kaisertum Österreich) was a Central European multinational great power from 1804 to 1919 (losing Hungary
Hungary
in 1867) created by proclamation out of the realms of the Habsburgs. During its existence, it was the third most populous empire after the Russian Empire
Empire
and France
France
in Europe. Along with Prussia, it was one of the two major powers of the German Confederation. Geographically, it was the second largest empire in Europe after the Russian Empire
Empire
(621,538 square kilometres [239,977 sq mi]). Proclaimed in response to the First French Empire, it overlapped with the Holy Roman Empire
Holy Roman Empire
until the latter's dissolution in 1806
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Ljubljana
Ljubljana
Ljubljana
(Slovene: [ljuˈbljàːna] ( listen),[5] locally also [luˈblàːna]; also known by other, historical names) is the capital and largest city of Slovenia.[6][7] It has been the cultural, educational, economic, political, and administrative center of independent Slovenia
Slovenia
since 1991. Its central geographic location within Slovenia, transport connections, concentration of industry, scientific and research institutions, and cultural tradition are contributing factors to its leading position. During antiquity, a Roman city called Emona
Emona
stood in the area.[8] Ljubljana
Ljubljana
itself was first mentioned in the first half of the 12th century. It was under Habsburg
Habsburg
rule from the Middle Ages until the dissolution of the Austro-Hungarian Empire in 1918
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Gorizia Statistical Region
The Gorizia
Gorizia
Statistical Region[1][2][3][4][5] (Slovene: Goriška statistična regija) is a statistical region in western Slovenia, along the border with Italy. It is named after the Italian town of Gorizia
Gorizia
(the feminine adjective goriška comes from the Slovenian name for Gorizia: Gorica).[6][7] The Julian Alps, the Soča River, and the Vipava Valley are the most prominent natural features of this region. It contributed just over 5% to total national GDP in 2012, but in terms of GDP per capita it ranked fourth in the country. In the same year, disposable income per capita in the region the highest, in second place behind the Central Slovenia
Slovenia
Statistical Region. Housing stock estimates indicate that at the end of 2013 the region had the highest share of dwellings with three or more rooms (around 70%). The share of single-room dwellings was less than 10%
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Coastal–Karst Statistical Region
The Coastal–Karst Statistical Region[1][2][3][4] (Slovene: Obalno-kraška statistična regija, Italian: Litorale-Carso) is a statistical region in southwest Slovenia. It covers the traditional and historical regions of Slovenian Istria
Slovenian Istria
and most of the Karst Plateau, which traditionally belonged to the County of Gorizia and Gradisca. The region has a sub-Mediterranean climate and is Slovenia's only statistical region bordering the sea. Its natural features enable the development of tourism, transport, and special agricultural crops. More than two-thirds of gross value added are generated by services (trade, accommodation, and transport); most was generated by activities at the Port of Koper
Koper
and through seaside and spa tourism. The region recorded almost a quarter of all tourist nights in the country in 2013; slightly less than half by domestic tourists
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Slovene Minority In Italy (1920–1947)
The Slovene minority in Italy
Slovene minority in Italy
(1920–1947) was the indigenous Slovene population—approximately 327,000 out of a total population of 1.3[1] million ethnic Slovenes
Slovenes
at the time[2]—that was cut from the remaining three-quarters of the Slovene ethnic community after the First World War. According to the secret Treaty of London and the Treaty of Rapallo in 1920, the former Austrian Littoral
Austrian Littoral
and western part of the former Inner Carniola
Inner Carniola
were annexed to the Kingdom of Italy
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Fascist Italianization
Italianization
Italianization
(Italian: Italianizzazione; Croatian: talijanizacija; Slovene: poitaljančevanje; German: Italianisierung; Greek: Ιταλοποίηση) is the spread of Italian culture, people, or language, either by integration or assimilation. It is most known for a process organized by the Kingdom of Italy to force cultural and ethnic assimilation, primarily, of the native populations living in the former Austro-Hungarian territories that were transferred to Italy after World War I
World War I
in exchange for Italy having joined the Triple Entente
Triple Entente
in 1915
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March Of Carniola
The March (or Margraviate) of Carniola
Carniola
(Slovene: Kranjska krajina; German: Mark Krain) was a southeastern state of the Holy Roman Empire in the High Middle Ages, the predecessor of the Duchy of Carniola. It corresponded roughly to the central Carniolan region of present-day Slovenia. At the time of its creation, the march served as a frontier defense against the Kingdoms of Hungary and Croatia.Contents1 History1.1 Foundation 1.2 Patriarchal rule 1.3 Bohemian rule 1.4 Austrian rule2 List of margraves 3 Notes 4 ReferencesHistory[edit] Main article: Carniola Before the coming of the Romans (c
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County Of Gorizia
The County
County
of Gorizia
Gorizia
(Italian: Contea di Gorizia, German: Grafschaft Görz, Slovene: Goriška grofija, Friulian: Contee di Gurize), from 1365 Princely County
County
of Gorizia, was a State of the Holy Roman Empire. Originally mediate Vogts of the Patriarchs of Aquileia, the Counts of Gorizia
Gorizia
(Meinhardiner) ruled over several fiefs in the area of Lienz and in the Friuli
Friuli
region of northeastern Italy
Italy
with their residence at Gorizia
Gorizia
(Görz). In 1253 the Counts of Gorizia
Gorizia
inherited the County
County
of Tyrol, from 1271 onwards ruled by the Gorizia-Tyrol branch which became extinct in the male line in 1335
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Leonhard Of Gorizia
Leonhard of Gorizia
Gorizia
(1440 – 12 April 1500) was the last Count of Görz from the Meinhardiner dynasty, who ruled at Lienz
Lienz
and Gorizia (Görz) from 1454 until his death. Life[edit] Leonhard was born at the comital residence Bruck Castle in Lienz, the son of Henry VI, Count of Gorizia
Count of Gorizia
and his wife, Katalin (Catherine), a daughter of the Hungarian palatine
Hungarian palatine
Nicholas II Garay. In 1454 he succeeded his father, who left him an almost ruined county with two separate territories. Leonhard at first ruled jointly with his brothers John II and Louis. John as the eldest apparently held most of the power while younger Louis did not exercise any political role and died between 1456 and 1457
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Imperial Free City Of Trieste
The Imperial Free City
Imperial Free City
of Trieste
Trieste
and its Suburbs was a Habsburg possession from the 14th century to 1918, called in German as Reichsunmittelbare Stadt Triest und ihr Gebiet and in Italian as Città Imperiale di Trieste
Trieste
e Dintorni. In 1719 it was declared a free port by Charles VI, Holy Roman Emperor; the construction of the Austrian Southern Railway
Austrian Southern Railway
(1841–57) turned it into a bustling seaport, through which much of the exports and imports of the Austrian Lands were channelled. Trieste
Trieste
was part of the Holy Roman Empire
Holy Roman Empire
and, later, of the German Confederation
German Confederation
and the Austrian Littoral
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Municipality Of Šempeter-Vrtojba
The Municipality of Šempeter-Vrtojba (pronounced [ʃɛmˈpeːtəɾ ʋəɾˈtoːi̯ba] or [ʃəmˈpeːtəɾ ʋəɾˈtoːi̯ba]; Slovene: Občina Šempeter - Vrtojba, Italian: Comune di San Pietro-Vertoiba) is a municipality in Slovenia. The municipality comprises the town of Šempeter pri Gorici and the adjacent village of Vrtojba. Overview[edit] Both settlements used to be suburbs of town of Gorizia
Gorizia
until 1947, when they become part of Yugoslavia while Gorizia
Gorizia
remained a part of Italy
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Crown Land
Crown land, also known as royal domain or demesne, is a territorial area belonging to the monarch, who personifies the Crown. It is the equivalent of an entailed estate and passes with the monarchy, being inseparable from it. Today, in Commonwealth realms such as Canada and Australia, crown land is considered public land and is apart from the monarch's private estate. In Britain, the hereditary revenues of Crown lands provided income for the monarch until the start of the reign of George III, when the profits from the Crown Estate were surrendered to the Parliament of Great Britain in return for a fixed civil list payment
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World War I
Allied victoryCentral Powers' victory on the Eastern Front nullified by defeat on the Western Front Fall of the German, Russian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian empires Russian Civil War
Russian Civil War
and foundation of the Soviet Union Formation of new countries in Europe
Europe
and the Middle East Transfer of German colonies
German colonies
and regions of the former Ottoman Empire to other powers Establishment of the League of Nations
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Austria-Hungary
Austria-Hungary, often referred to as the Austro-Hungarian Empire
Empire
or the Dual Monarchy
Dual Monarchy
in English-language sources, was a constitutional union of the Austrian Empire
Austrian Empire
(the Kingdoms and Lands Represented in the Imperial Council, or Cisleithania) and the Kingdom of Hungary ( Lands of the Crown of Saint Stephen
Lands of the Crown of Saint Stephen
or Transleithania) that existed from 1867 to 1918, when it collapsed as a result of defeat in World War I. The union was a result of the Austro-Hungarian Compromise of 1867 and came into existence on 30 March 1867
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