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Slovene Language
Slovene (/ˈsloʊviːn/ ( listen) or /sloʊˈviːn, slə-/[7]) or Slovenian (/sloʊˈviːniən, slə-/ ( listen);[8][9] slovenski jezik or slovenščina) belongs to the group of South Slavic languages. It is spoken by approximately 2.5 million speakers worldwide, the majority of whom live in Slovenia
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Slovak Language
Slovak (/ˈsloʊvæk, -vɑːk/ ( listen)[5][6]) is an Indo-European language that belongs to the West Slavic languages (together with Czech, Polish, and Sorbian). It is called slovenský jazyk (pronounced [ˈsloʋenskiː ˈjazik] ( listen)) or slovenčina ([ˈsloʋent͡ʃina]) in the language itself. Slovak is the official language of Slovakia, where it is spoken by approximately 5.51 million people (2014)
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Montenegrin Language
Montenegrin (/ˌmɒntɪˈniːɡrɪn/; црногорски / crnogorski) is the standardized[clarification needed] variety of the Serbo-Croatian
Serbo-Croatian
language used as the official language of Montenegro. Standard Montenegrin is based on the most widespread dialect of Serbo-Croatian, Shtokavian, more specifically on Eastern Herzegovinian, which is also the basis of Standard Croatian, Serbian, and Bosnian.[6] Montenegro's language has historically and traditionally been called Serbian.[7] The idea of a Montenegrin standard language separate from Serbian appeared in the 1990s during the breakup of Yugoslavia, through proponents of Montenegrin independence. Montenegrin became the official language of Montenegro
Montenegro
with the ratification of a new constitution on 22 October 2007. The Montenegrin standard is still emerging. Its orthography was established on 10 July 2009 with the addition of two letters to the alphabet
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ISO 639-3
ISO 639-3:2007, Codes for the representation of names of languages – Part 3: Alpha-3 code for comprehensive coverage of languages, is an international standard for language codes in the ISO 639 series. It defines three-letter codes for identifying languages. The standard was published by ISO on 1 February 2007.[1] ISO 639-3 extends the ISO 639-2 alpha-3 codes with an aim to cover all known natural languages
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Glottolog
Glottolog
Glottolog
is a bibliographic database of the world's lesser-known languages, developed and maintained first at the former Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, and since 2015 at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena, Germany. Glottolog
Glottolog
provides a catalogue of the world's languages and language families, and a bibliography on the world's less-spoken languages
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Linguasphere Observatory
The Linguasphere Observatory (or "Observatoire", based upon its original French and legal title: Observatoire Linguistique) is a transnational linguistic research network.Contents1 History 2 The Lingua sphere Register and Linguascale referential framework2.1 Examples 2.2 Languages of London 2.3 See also3 "Langues de la Liberté/Languages of Liberty" 4 "In the galaxy of languages, each person's voice is a star" 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] It was created in Quebec
Quebec
in 1983 and was subsequently established and registered in Normandy
Normandy
as a non-profit association under the honorary presidency of the late Léopold Sédar Senghor, a French-language poet and the first president of Senegal
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International Phonetic Alphabet
The International
International
Phonetic Alphabet
Alphabet
(IPA) is an alphabetic system of phonetic notation based primarily on the Latin alphabet
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Replacement Character
Specials is a short Unicode
Unicode
block allocated at the very end of the Basic Multilingual Plane, at U+FFF0–FFFF. Of these 16 code points, five are assigned as of Unicode
Unicode
10.0:U+FFF9 INTERLINEAR ANNOTATION ANCHOR, marks start of annotated text U+FFFA INTERLINEAR ANNOTATION SEPARATOR, marks start of annotating character(s) U+FFFB INTERLINEAR ANNOTATION TERMINATOR, marks end of annotation block U+FFFC  OBJECT REPLACEMENT CHARACTER, placeholder in the text for another unspecified object, for example in a compound document. U+FFFD � REPLACEMENT CHARACTER used to replace an unknown, unrecognized or unrepresentable character U+FFFE <noncharacter-FFFE> not a character. U+FFFF <noncharacter-FFFF> not a character.FFFE and FFFF are not unassigned in the usual sense, but guaranteed not to be a Unicode
Unicode
character at all
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Unicode
Unicode
Unicode
is a computing industry standard for the consistent encoding, representation, and handling of text expressed in most of the world's writing systems. The latest version contains a repertoire of 136,755 characters covering 139 modern and historic scripts, as well as multiple symbol sets
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Serbo-Croatian
Serbo-Croatian
Serbo-Croatian
/ˌsɜːrboʊkroʊˈeɪʃən, -bə-/ ( listen),[7][8] also called Serbo-Croat /ˌsɜːrboʊˈkroʊæt, -bə-/,[7][8] Serbo-Croat-Bosnian (SCB),[9] Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian (BCS),[10] or Bosnian-Croatian-Montenegrin-Serbian (BCMS),[11] is a South Slavic language and the primary language of Serbia, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and Montenegro. It is a pluricentric language with four[12] mutually intelligible standard varieties. South Slavic dialects historically formed a continuum. The turbulent history of the area, particularly due to expansion of the Ottoman Empire, resulted in a patchwork of dialectal and religious differences
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Bosnian Language
The Bosnian language
Bosnian language
(/ˈbɒzniən/ ( listen); bosanski / босански [bɔ̌sanskiː]) is the standardized variety of Serbo-Croatian
Serbo-Croatian
mainly used by Bosniaks.[4][5][6] Bosnian is one of three such varieties considered official languages of Bosnia and Herzegovina,[7] along with Croatian and Serbian, and also an officially recognized minority or regional language in Serbia,[8] Montenegro,[9] and the Republic of Kosovo.[10] Bosnian uses both Latin and Cyrillic alphabet,[Note 1] with Latin in everyday use.[11] It is notable among the varieties of Serbo-Croatian for a number of Arabic, Ottoman Turkish and Persian loanwords, largely due to the language's interaction with those cultures through Islamic ties.[12][13][14] Bosnian is based on the most widespread dialect of Serbo-Croatian, Shtokavian, more specifically on Eastern Herzegovinian, which is also the basis of Croatian, Serbian, and Montenegrin
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Croatian Language
Croatian /kroʊˈeɪʃən/ ( listen) (hrvatski [xř̩ʋaːtskiː]) is the standardized variety of the Serbo-Croatian language[6][7][8] used by Croats,[9] principally in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, the Serbian province of Vojvodina
Vojvodina
and other neighboring countries. It is the official and literary standard of Croatia
Croatia
and one of the official languages of the European Union. Croatian is also one of the official languages of Bosnia and Herzegovina, a recognized minority language in Serbia, and neighboring countries. Standard Croatian is based on the most widespread dialect of Serbo-Croatian, Shtokavian, more specifically on Eastern Herzegovinian, which is also the basis of Standard Serbian, Bosnian, and Montenegrin
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Serbian Language
Serbian (српски / srpski, pronounced [sr̩̂pskiː]) is the standardized variety of the Serbo-Croatian
Serbo-Croatian
language mainly used by Serbs.[8][9][10] It is the official language of Serbia, the territory of Kosovo, and one of the three official languages of Bosnia and Herzegovina
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ISO 639-1
 ISO 639-1:2002, Codes for the representation of names of languages — Part 1: Alpha-2 code, is the first part of the ISO 639 series of international standards for language codes. Part 1 covers the registration of two-letter codes. There are 184 two-letter codes registered as of October 2015. The registered codes cover the world's major languages. These codes are a useful international and formal shorthand for indicating languages
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Slavonic-Serbian
Slavonic-Serbian
Slavonic-Serbian
(славяносербскій, slavyanoserbskiy), Slavo-Serbian, or Slaveno-Serbian (славено-сербскiй, slaveno-serbski; Serbian: славеносрпски/slavenosrpski) was a literary language used by the Serbs
Serbs
in the Habsburg Empire, mostly in what is now Vojvodina, from the mid-18th century to the first decades of the 19th century
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Dialects Of Serbo-Croatian
The dialects of Serbo-Croatian
Serbo-Croatian
include the regional varieties of Serbo-Croatian
Serbo-Croatian
as a whole or as part of its standard varieties: Bosnian, Croatian, Montenegrin and Serbian. They are part of the dialect continuum of South Slavic languages[1][2] that joins the Macedonian dialects to the south, Bulgarian dialects
Bulgarian dialects
to the southeast and Slovene dialects
Slovene dialects
to the northwest.[3] The primary dialects are named after the most common question word for what: Shtokavian
Shtokavian
(štokavski) uses the pronoun što or šta, Chakavian (čakavski) uses ča or ca, Kajkavian
Kajkavian
(kajkavski), kaj or kej
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