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Slade School Of Fine Art
The UCL Slade School of Fine Art
Fine Art
(informally The Slade) is the art school of University College London
University College London
(UCL) and is based in London, United Kingdom
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Felix Slade
Felix Joseph Slade FRA (6 August 1788[1] – 29 March 1868), was an English lawyer and collector of glass, books and prints.Portrait of Mr. Felix Slade, c. 1851, by Margaret Sarah CarpenterA fellow of the Society of Antiquaries (1866) and a philanthropist who endowed three Slade Professorships of Fine Art at Oxford University and Cambridge University, and at University College London, where he also endowed scholarships which formed the beginning of the Slade School of Art (founded 1871) in London, whose Director holds the Slade Professorship
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Interactivity
Across the many fields concerned with interactivity, including information science, computer science, human-computer interaction, communication, and industrial design, there is little agreement over the meaning of the term "interactivity", although all are related to interaction with computers and other machines with a user interface. Multiple views on interactivity exist. In the "contingency view" of interactivity, there are three levels:Not interactive, when a message is not related to previous messages; Reactive, when a message is related only to one immediately previous message; and Interactive, when a message is related to a number of previous messages and to the relationship between them.[1]One body of research has made a strong distinction between interaction and interactivity
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David Boyd Haycock
David Boyd Haycock (born 1968 in Banbury, Oxfordshire)[1] is a British writer of non-fiction. He is the author of Paul Nash (2002),[2] William Stukeley (2002),[3] Mortal Coil (2008)[4] and A Crisis of Brilliance: Five Young British Artists and the Great War (2009), a group biography of the artists Paul Nash, Stanley Spencer, Mark Gertler, Dora Carrington
Dora Carrington
and C.R.W. Nevinson, all of whom were students together at the Slade School of Art
Slade School of Art
in London.[5] He lives in Oxford.[6] A Crisis of Brilliance was nominated in the "Best Non-Fiction Book" category at the 2010 Writers' Guild of Great Britain
Writers' Guild of Great Britain
awards.[6] An exhibition based on the book opened at Dulwich Picture Gallery
Dulwich Picture Gallery
in June 2013
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Mark Gertler (artist)
Mark Gertler (9 December 1891 – 23 June 1939), born Marks Gertler, was a British painter of figure subjects, portraits and still-life. His early life and his relationship with Dora Carrington
Dora Carrington
were the inspiration for Gilbert Cannan's novel Mendel.[1] The characters of Loerke in D. H. Lawrence's Women in Love[2] and Gombauld in Aldous Huxley's Crome Yellow
Crome Yellow
were based on him.[3]Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Legacy 4 References 5 External linksEarly life[edit]Queen of Sheba, 1922Marks Gertler was born on 9 December 1891 in Spitalfields, London, the youngest child of Polish Jewish immigrants, Louis Gertler and Kate "Golda" Berenbaum.[4] He had four older siblings: Deborah (b. 1881), Harry (b. 1882), Sophie (b. 1883) and Jacob "Jack" (b
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Paul Nash (artist)
Paul Nash (11 May 1889 – 11 July 1946) was a British surrealist painter and war artist, as well as a photographer, writer and designer of applied art. Nash was among the most important landscape artists of the first half of the twentieth century. He played a key role in the development of Modernism
Modernism
in English art. Born in London, Nash grew up in Buckinghamshire
Buckinghamshire
where he developed a love of the landscape. He entered the Slade School of Art
Slade School of Art
but was poor at figure drawing and concentrated on landscape painting.[1] Nash found much inspiration in landscapes with elements of ancient history, such as burial mounds, Iron Age
Iron Age
hill forts such as Wittenham Clumps and the standing stones at Avebury
Avebury
in Wiltshire
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C.R.W. Nevinson
Christopher Richard Wynne Nevinson ARA (13 August 1889 – 7 October 1946) was an English figure and landscape painter, etcher and lithographer, who was one of the most famous war artists of World War I. He is often referred to by his initials C. R. W. Nevinson, and was also known as Richard. Nevinson studied at the Slade School of Art
Slade School of Art
under Henry Tonks
Henry Tonks
and alongside Stanley Spencer
Stanley Spencer
and Mark Gertler. When he left the Slade, Nevinson befriended Marinetti, the leader of the Italian Futurists, and the radical writer and artist Wyndham Lewis, who founded the short-lived Rebel Art Centre. However, Nevinson fell out with Lewis and the other 'rebel' artists when he attached their names to the Futurist movement
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Electronic Media
Electronic media
Electronic media
are media that use electronics or electromechanical audience to access the content. This is in contrast to static media (mainly print media), which today are most often created electronically, but do not require electronics to be accessed by the end user in the printed form. The primary electronic media sources familiar to the general public are video recordings, audio recordings, multimedia presentations, slide presentations, CD-ROM
CD-ROM
and online content. Most new media are in the form of digital media
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Public Lecture
A public lecture is one means employed for educating the public in the arts and sciences. The Royal Institution
Royal Institution
has a long history of public lectures and demonstrations given by prominent experts in the field. In the 19th century, the popularity of the public lectures given by Sir Humphry Davy
Sir Humphry Davy
at the Royal Institution
Royal Institution
was so great that the volume of carriage traffic in Albemarle Street
Albemarle Street
caused it to become the first one-way street in London. The Royal Institution's Christmas Lectures for young people are nowadays also shown on television. Alexander von Humboldt delivered a series of public lectures at the University of Berlin in the winter of 1827–1828, that formed the basis for his later work Kosmos. Besides public lectures, public autopsies have been important in promoting knowledge of medicine. The public autopsy of Dr
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Curators
A curator (from Latin: cura, meaning "to take care")[1] is a manager or overseer. Traditionally, a curator or keeper of a cultural heritage institution (e.g., gallery, museum, library, or archive) is a content specialist charged with an institution's collections and involved with the interpretation of heritage material. A traditional curator's concern necessarily involves tangible objects of some sort—artwork, collectibles, historic items, or scientific collections. More recently, new kinds of curators have started to emerge: curators of digital data objects and biocurators.Contents1 Curation scope 2 Education and training 3 Technology and society 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksCuration scope[edit] In smaller organizations, a curator may have sole responsibility for acquisitions and even for collections care
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Telematics
Telematics
Telematics
is an interdisciplinary field that encompasses telecommunications, vehicular technologies, road transportation, road safety, electrical engineering (sensors, instrumentation, wireless communications, etc.), and computer science (multimedia, Internet, etc.)
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Augustus John
Augustus Edwin John OM RA (4 January 1878 – 31 October 1961) was a Welsh painter, draughtsman, and etcher. For a short time around 1910, he was an important exponent of Post-Impressionism
Post-Impressionism
in the United Kingdom. He was the brother of the painter Gwen John. "Augustus was celebrated first for his brilliant figure drawings, and then for a new technique of oil sketching. His work was favourably compared in London with that of Gauguin
Gauguin
and Matisse. He then developed a style of portraiture that was imaginative and often extravagant, catching an instantaneous attitude in his subjects."[1]Contents1 Early life 2 North Wales 3 Provence 4 War 5 Portraits 6 Family 7 Later life 8 Honours 9 Bibliography 10 See also 11 References 12 See also 13 External linksEarly life[edit] John was born at Tenby
Tenby
in Pembrokeshire, the younger son and third of four children in his family
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Arts Council
An arts council is a government or private non-profit organization dedicated to promoting the arts; mainly by funding local artists, awarding prizes, and organizing arts events. They often operate at arms-length from the government to prevent political interference in their decisions.Contents1 List of arts councils1.1 North America1.1.1 Canada 1.1.2 United States1.1.2.1 States1.1.2.1.1 California 1.1.2.1.2 Florida 1.1.2.1.3 Minnesota 1.1.2.1.4 New York 1.1.2.1.5 North Carolina 1.1.2.1.6 Utah1.2 Europe1.2.1 Bulgaria 1.2.2 Germany 1.2.3 Ireland 1.2.4 Norway 1.2.5 Sweden 1.2.6 United Kingdom1.3 Asia1.3.1 India 1.3.2 Pakistan 1.3.3 Philippines 1.3.4 Singapore1.4 Africa 1.5 Oceania2 References 3 Further readingList of arts councils[edit] This is a dynamic list and may never be able to satisfy particular standards for completeness
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Psychology
Psychology
Psychology
is the science of behavior and mind, including conscious and unconscious phenomena, as well as thought. It is an academic discipline of immense scope and diverse interests that, when taken together, seek an understanding of the emergent properties of brains, and all the variety of epiphenomena they manifest. As a social science it aims to understand individuals and groups by establishing general principles and researching specific cases.[1][2] In this field, a professional practitioner or researcher is called a psychologist and can be classified as a social, behavioral, or cognitive scientist
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Computer Science
Computer science
Computer science
is the study of the theory, experimentation, and engineering that form the basis for the design and use of computers. It is the scientific and practical approach to computation and its applications and the systematic study of the feasibility, structure, expression, and mechanization of the methodical procedures (or algorithms) that underlie the acquisition, representation, processing, storage, communication of, and access to, information. An alternate, more succinct definition of computer science is the study of automating algorithmic processes that scale. A computer scientist specializes in the theory of computation and the design of computational systems.[1] Its fields can be divided into a variety of theoretical and practical disciplines
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Institute Of Contemporary Arts
Contemporary history
Contemporary history
is a subset of modern history which describes the historical period from approximately 1945 to the present.[1] The term "contemporary history" has been in use at least since the early 19th century.[2] Contemporary history
Contemporary history
is politically dominated by the Cold War (1945–91) between the United States
United States
and Soviet Union
Soviet Union
whose effects were felt across the world. The confrontation, which was mainly fought through proxy wars and through intervention in the internal politics of smaller nations, ultimately ended with the dissolution of the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
and Warsaw Pact
Warsaw Pact
in 1991, following the Revolutions of 1989
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