HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Single-player Video Game
A single-player video game is a video game where input from only one player is expected throughout the course of the gaming session. A single-player game is usually a game that can only be played by one person, while "single-player mode" is usually a game mode designed to be played by a single-player, though the game also contains multi-player modes.[1] The vast majority of modern console games and arcade games are designed so that they can be played by a single-player; although many of these games have modes that allow two or more players to play (not necessarily simultaneously), very few actually require more than one player for the game to be played
[...More...]

"Single-player Video Game" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Video Game
A video game is an electronic game that involves interaction with a user interface to generate visual feedback on a video device such as a TV screen or computer monitor. The word video in video game traditionally referred to a raster display device, but as of the 2000s, it implies any type of display device that can produce two- or three-dimensional images. Some theorists categorize video games as an art form, but this designation is controversial. The electronic systems used to play video games are known as platforms; examples of these are personal computers and video game consoles. These platforms range from large mainframe computers to small handheld computing devices
[...More...]

"Video Game" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lynda Carter
Lynda Carter
Lynda Carter
(born Linda Jean Córdova Carter; July 24, 1951) is an American actress, singer, songwriter, model, and beauty pageant titleholder, who was crowned Miss World
Miss World
America 1972. Carter is most widely known as the star of the American live action
[...More...]

"Lynda Carter" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Non-player Character
A non-player character (NPC) in a game is any character that is not controlled by a player.[1] In video games, this usually means a character controlled by the computer via predetermined or responsive behavior, but not necessarily true artificial intelligence. In traditional tabletop role-playing games the term applies to characters controlled by the gamemaster or referee, rather than another player.Contents1 Role-playing games1.1 Playability 1.2 Dependents2 Video games 3 See also 4 ReferencesRole-playing games[edit] In a traditional tabletop role-playing game such as Dungeons & Dragons, an NPC is a fictional character portrayed by the gamemaster.[2] If player characters form the narrative's protagonists, non-player characters can be thought of as the "supporting cast" or "extras" of a roleplaying narrative. Non-player characters populate the fictional world of the game, and can fill any role not occupied by a player character (PC)
[...More...]

"Non-player Character" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Antagonist
An antagonist is a character, group of characters, institution or concept that stands in or represents opposition against which the protagonist(s) must contend. In other words, an antagonist is a person or a group of people who opposes a protagonist.[1]Contents1 Etymology 2 Types2.1 Heroes and villains 2.2 Other characters 2.3 Aspects of the protagonist 2.4 Non-personal3 Usage 4 See also 5 ReferencesEtymology[edit] The English word antagonist comes from the Greek ἀνταγωνιστής – antagonistēs, "opponent, competitor, villain, enemy, rival," which is derived from anti- ("against") and agonizesthai ("to contend for a prize").[2][3]. Types[edit] Heroes and villains[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
[...More...]

"Antagonist" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Dragon Quest
Dragon Quest,[a] published as Dragon Warrior in North America until 2005,[b] is a series of console role-playing video games created by Yuji Horii and his studio Armor Project. The games are published by Square Enix
Square Enix
(formerly Enix), with localized versions of later installments for the Nintendo
Nintendo
DS being published by Nintendo
Nintendo
outside Japan. With its first title published in 1986, there are eleven main-series titles, along with numerous spin-off games. Nearly every game in the main series has either an anime or manga adaptation, or both. The series has had a significant impact on the development of console role-playing games, and introduced a number of features to the genre
[...More...]

"Dragon Quest" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Final Fantasy
Final Fantasy[a] is a science fiction and fantasy media franchise created by Hironobu Sakaguchi, and developed and owned by Square Enix (formerly Square). The franchise centers on a series of fantasy and science fantasy role-playing video games (RPGs). The first game in the series, published in 1987, was conceived by Sakaguchi as his last-ditch effort in the game industry; it was a success and spawned sequels. The series has since branched into other genres such as tactical role-playing, action role-playing, massively multiplayer online role-playing, racing, third-person shooter, fighting, and rhythm. The franchise has also branched out into other media, including CGI films, anime, manga, and novels. Although most Final Fantasy
Fantasy
installments are stand-alone stories with different settings and main characters, they feature identical elements that define the franchise. Recurring elements include plot themes, character names, and game mechanics
[...More...]

"Final Fantasy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Puzzle Video Game
Puzzle
Puzzle
video games make up a unique genre of video games that emphasize puzzle solving. The types of puzzles can test many problem-solving skills including logic, pattern recognition, sequence solving, and word completion. The player may have unlimited time or infinite attempts to solve a puzzle, or there may be a time limit, or simpler puzzles may be made difficult by having to complete them in real time, as in Tetris. The genre is very broad, but it generally involves some level of abstraction and may make use of colors, shapes, numbers, physics, or complex rules. Unlike many video games, puzzle video games often do make use of "lives" that challenge a player by limiting the number of tries
[...More...]

"Puzzle Video Game" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Racing Game
The racing video game genre is the genre of video games, either in the first-person or third-person perspective, in which the player partakes in a racing competition with any type of land, water, air or space vehicles. They may be based on anything from real-world racing leagues to entirely fantastical settings. In general, they can be distributed along a spectrum anywhere between hardcore simulations, and simpler arcade racing games. Racing
Racing
games may also fall under the category of sports games.Contents1 History1.1 1970s 1.2 1980s 1.3 1990s 1.4 2000s2 Subgenres2.1 Arcade-style racers 2.2 Racing
Racing
simulators 2.3 Kart racing games3 See also 4 ReferencesHistory[edit] 1970s[edit] In 1973, Atari
Atari
released Space Race, an arcade video game where players control spaceships that race against opposing ships, while avoiding comets and meteors
[...More...]

"Racing Game" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Massively Multiplayer Online Game
A massively multiplayer online game (MMOG, or more commonly, MMO) is an online game with large numbers of players, typically from hundreds to thousands, on the same server.[1] MMOs usually feature a huge, persistent open world, although some games differ. These games can be found for most network-capable platforms, including the personal computer, video game console, or smartphones and other mobile devices. MMOs can enable players to cooperate and compete with each other on a large scale, and sometimes to interact meaningfully with people around the world
[...More...]

"Massively Multiplayer Online Game" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Overwatch (video Game)
Overwatch is a team-based multiplayer first-person shooter video game developed and published by Blizzard Entertainment, which released on May 24, 2016 for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and Windows. Overwatch assigns players into two teams of six, with each player selecting from a roster of over 20 characters, known in-game as "heroes", each with a unique style of play, whose roles are divided into four general categories: Offense, Defense, Tank, and Support. Players on a team work together to secure and defend control points on a map or escort a payload across the map in a limited amount of time. Players gain cosmetic rewards that do not affect gameplay, such as character skins and victory poses, as they play the game. The game was initially launched with casual play, with a competitive ranked mode, various 'arcade' game modes, and a player-customizable server browser subsequently included following its release
[...More...]

"Overwatch (video Game)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Future Plc
Future plc
Future plc
is a British media company founded in 1985. It publishes more than 50 magazines in fields such as video games, technology, films, music, photography, home and knowledge.[1] It is a constituent of the FTSE Fledgling Index
[...More...]

"Future Plc" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Eurogamer
EurogamerType of site Video game
Video game
journalismOwner Gamer Network (ReedPOP) (Reed Exhibitions)Editor Oli WelshDivisions USgamer, Digital Foundry, GamesIndustry.bizWebsite eurogamer.netAlexa rank 1927 (December 2017[update])[1]Commercial YesRegistration Optional (free)Launched 3 May 1999; 18 years ago (1999-05-03)[2]Current status Active Eurogamer
Eurogamer
is a website focused on video game news, reviews, and other features. It is operated by Gamer Network Ltd. with headquarters in Brighton, East Sussex
[...More...]

"Eurogamer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Polygon (website)
Polygon
Polygon
is an American video game website that publishes news, culture, reviews, and videos. At its October 2012 launch as Vox Media's third property, Polygon
Polygon
sought to distinguish itself from competitors by focusing on the stories of the people behind the games instead of the games themselves. They also produced long-form magazine-style feature articles, invested in video content, and chose to let their review scores be updated as the game changed. The site was built over the course of ten months, and its 16-person founding staff included the editors-in-chief of the gaming sites Joystiq, Kotaku
Kotaku
and The Escapist. Its design was built to HTML5 responsive standards with a pink color scheme, and its advertisements focused on direct sponsorship of specific kinds of content
[...More...]

"Polygon (website)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.