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Single (music)
In music, a single, record single or music single is a type of release, typically a song recording of fewer tracks than an LP record, an album or an EP record. This can be released for sale to the public in a variety of different formats. In most cases, a single is a song that is released separately from an album, although it usually also appears on an album. Typically, these are the songs from albums that are released separately for promotional uses such as digital download or commercial radio airplay and are expected to be the most popular. In other cases a recording released as a single may not appear on an album. As digital downloading and audio streaming have become more prevalent, it is often possible for every track on an album to also be available separately
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DVD
DVD
DVD
(an abbreviation of "digital video disc"[5] or "digital versatile disc"[6][7]) is a digital optical disc storage format invented and developed by Philips
Philips
and Sony
Sony
in 1995. The medium can store any kind of digital data and is widely used for software and other computer files as well as video programs watched using DVD
DVD
players. DVDs offer higher storage capacity than compact discs while having the same dimensions. Prerecorded DVDs are mass-produced using molding machines that physically stamp data onto the DVD. Such discs are a form of DVD-ROM because data can only be read and not written or erased. Blank recordable DVD
DVD
discs ( DVD-R
DVD-R
and DVD+R) can be recorded once using a DVD recorder and then function as a DVD-ROM
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Columbia Records
Columbia Records
Columbia Records
is an American major record label owned by Sony
Sony
Music Entertainment through Sony
Sony
Entertainment, both are subsidiaries of Sony Corporation
Sony Corporation
of America, the United States division of Sony Corporation. It was founded in 1887 from an earlier enterprise named the American Graphophone
Graphophone
Company, the successor to the Volta Graphophone
Graphophone
Company.[1] From 1961 to 1990, Columbia's recordings were released outside the U.S. and Canada under the name CBS
CBS
Records to avoid being confused with the Columbia Graphophone Company
Columbia Graphophone Company
in the UK
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Monaural
Monaural
Monaural
or monophonic sound reproduction (often shortened to mono) is sound intended to be heard as if it were emanating from one position. This contrasts with stereophonic sound or stereo, which uses two separate audio channels to reproduce sound from two microphones on the right and left side, which is reproduced with two separate loudspeakers to give a sense of the direction of sound sources. In mono, only one loudspeaker is necessary, but, when played through multiple loudspeakers or headphones, identical signals are fed to each speaker, resulting in the perception of one-channel sound "imaging" in one sonic space between the speakers (provided that the speakers are set up in a proper symmetrical critical-listening placement). Monaural recordings, like stereo ones, typically use multiple microphones fed into multiple channels on a recording console, but each channel is "panned" to the center
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Dance Music
Dance
Dance
music is music composed specifically to facilitate or accompany dancing. It can be either a whole musical piece or part of a larger musical arrangement. In terms of performance, the major categories are live dance music and recorded dance music. While there exist attestations of the combination of dance and music in ancient times (for example Ancient Greek vases sometimes show dancers accompanied by musicians), the earliest Western dance music that we can still reproduce with a degree of certainty are the surviving medieval dances. In the Baroque period, the major dance styles were noble court dances (see Baroque dance). In the classical music era, the minuet was frequently used as a third movement, although in this context it would not accompany any dancing. The waltz also arose later in the classical era
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Fidelity
Fidelity
Fidelity
is the quality of faithfulness or loyalty. Its original meaning regarded duty in a broader sense than the related concept of fealty. Both derive from the Latin
Latin
word fidēlis, meaning "faithful or loyal". In the City of London
City of London
financial markets it has traditionally been used in the sense encompassed in the motto "My word is my bond".Contents1 Audio and electronics 2 Scientific modelling
Scientific modelling
and simulation 3 Program evaluation 4 ReferencesAudio and electronics[edit] "Low fidelity" redirects here. For the aesthetic, see Lo-fi music. See also: Sound recording and reproduction In audio, "fidelity" denotes how accurately a copy reproduces its source
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RCA Victor
RCA
RCA
Records is an American record label owned by Sony
Sony
Music, a subsidiary of Sony
Sony
Corporation of America. It is one of Sony
Sony
Music Entertainment's three flagship record labels, alongside Columbia Records and Epic Records. The label has released multiple genres of music, including pop, rock, hip hop, electronic, R&B, blues, jazz, and country. The company's name is derived from the initials of the label's defunct parent company, the Radio Corporation of America[1] (RCA). It is the second oldest recording company in US history, after sister label Columbia Records. RCA's Canadian
Canadian
unit (formerly Berliner Gramophone Canada, then RCA
RCA
Victor Company Ltd. Canada), is Sony's oldest label in Canada
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Videotape
Videotape
Videotape
is magnetic tape used for storing video and usually sound in addition. Information stored can be in the form of either an analog signal or digital signal. Videotape
Videotape
is used in both video tape recorders (VTRs) or, more commonly, videocassette recorders (VCRs) and camcorders. Videotapes are also used for storing scientific or medical data, such as the data produced by an electrocardiogram. Because video signals have a very high bandwidth, and stationary heads would require extremely high tape speeds, in most cases, a helical-scan video head rotates against the moving tape to record the data in two dimensions. Tape is a linear method of storing information and thus imposes delays to access a portion of the tape that is not already under the heads. The early 2000s saw the introduction and rise to prominence of high quality random-access video recording media such as hard disks and flash memory
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VHS
The Video
Video
Home System[1][2] (VHS)[3] is a standard for consumer-level analog video recording on tape cassettes. Developed by Victor Company of Japan (JVC) in the early 1970s, it was released in Japan in late 1976 and in the United States in early 1977. From the 1950s, magnetic tape video recording became a major contributor to the television industry, via the first commercialized video tape recorders (VTRs). At that time, the devices were used only in expensive professional environments such as television studios and medical imaging (fluoroscopy). In the 1970s, videotape entered home use, creating the home video industry and changing the economics of the television and movie businesses. The television industry viewed videocassette recorders (VCRs) as having the power to disrupt their business, while television users viewed the VCR as the means to take control of their hobby.[4] In the 1970s and early 1980s, there was a format war in the home video industry
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Digital Compact Cassette
The Digital Compact Cassette
Compact Cassette
(DCC) is a magnetic tape sound recording format introduced by Philips
Philips
and Matsushita in late 1992 and marketed as the successor to the standard analog Compact Cassette. It was also a direct competitor to Sony's MiniDisc
MiniDisc
(MD), but neither format toppled the then-ubiquitous analog cassette despite their technical superiority. Another competing format, the Digital Audio Tape
Digital Audio Tape
(DAT) had by 1992 also failed to sell in large quantities (although it was established in recording studios)—DCC was envisaged as a less expensive alternative to DAT. DCC shares a similar form factor to analog compact cassettes, and DCC recorders can play back either type of cassette
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Flexi Disc
The flexi disc (also known as a phonosheet, Sonosheet or Soundsheet, a trademark) is a phonograph record made of a thin, flexible vinyl sheet with a molded-in spiral stylus groove, and is designed to be playable on a normal phonograph turntable
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Betamax
Betamax
Betamax
(also called Beta, as in its logo) is a consumer-level analog-recording and cassette format of magnetic tape for video. It was developed by Sony
Sony
and was released in Japan
Japan
on May 10, 1975.[1] The first Betamax
Betamax
device introduced in the United States was the LV-1901 console, which included a 19-inch (48 cm) color monitor, and appeared in stores in early November 1975
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Video 8
The 8mm video format refers informally to three related videocassette formats for the NTSC
NTSC
and PAL/ SECAM
SECAM
television systems. These are the original Video8 (analog recording) format and its improved successor Hi8 (analog video and analog audio but with provision for digital audio), as well as a more recent digital recording format known as Digital8. Their user base consisted mainly of amateur camcorder users, although they also saw important use in the professional television production field. In January 1984, Eastman Kodak
Kodak
announced the new technology. [1][2]In 1985, Sony
Sony
of Japan introduced the Handycam, one of the first Video8 cameras with commercial success
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Jukebox
A jukebox is a partially automated music-playing device, usually a coin-operated machine, that will play a patron's selection from self-contained media. The classic jukebox has buttons with letters and numbers on them that, when entered in combination, are used to play a specific selection.Contents1 History 2 Notable models 3 Decline 4 Digital jukebox4.1 Jukebox
Jukebox
apps5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] Coin-operated music boxes and player pianos were the first forms of automated coin-operated musical devices. These instruments used paper rolls, metal disks, or metal cylinders to play a musical selection on the instrument, or instruments, enclosed within the device. In the 1890s these devices were joined by machines which used actual recordings instead of physical instruments.[2][3] In 1890, Louis Glass and William S
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Take
A take is a single continuous recorded performance. The term is used in film and music to denote and track the stages of production.Contents1 Film1.1 Single-takes 1.2 Long takes 1.3 Multiple takes2 Music recording 3 See also 4 ReferencesFilm[edit] In cinematography, a take refers to each filmed "version" of a particular shot or "setup". Takes of each shot are generally numbered starting with "take one" and the number of each successive take is increased (with the director calling for "take two" or "take eighteen") until the filming of the shot is completed. Film takes are often designated with the aid of a clapperboard. It is also referred to as the slate
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Polyvinyl Chloride
Polyvinyl chloride
Polyvinyl chloride
(/ˌpɒlivaɪnəl ˈklɔːraɪd/),[5] also known as polyvinyl or vinyl,[6] commonly abbreviated PVC, is the world's third-most widely produced synthetic plastic polymer, after polyethylene and polypropylene.[7] PVC comes in two basic forms: rigid (sometimes abbreviated as RPVC) and flexible. The rigid form of PVC is used in construction for pipe and in profile applications such as doors and windows. It is also used in making bottles, non-food packaging, and cards (such as bank or membership cards). It can be made softer and more flexible by the addition of plasticizers, the most widely used being phthalates. In this form, it is also used in plumbing, electrical cable insulation, imitation leather, signage, phonograph records,[8] inflatable products, and many applications where it replaces rubber.[9] Pure polyvinyl chloride is a white, brittle solid
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