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Simcha Bunim Of Peshischa
Simcha (Hebrew: שִׂמְחָה‬ śimḥāʰ; Hebrew pronunciation: [simˈχa], Yiddish pronunciation: [ˈsɪmχə]) is a Hebrew
Hebrew
word that means gladness, or joy, and is often used as a given name.Contents1 Uses1.1 Holidays 1.2 Other uses2 Name 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksUses[edit] Main article: Happiness in Judaism The concept of simcha is an important one in Jewish philosophy. A popular teaching by Rabbi Nachman of Breslov, a 19th-century Chassidic Rabbi, is " Mitzvah Gedolah Le'hiyot Besimcha Tamid," it is a great mitzvah (commandment) to always be in a state of happiness. When a person is happy they are much more capable of serving God and going about their daily activities than when depressed or upset.[1] Jews often use simcha in its capacity as a Hebrew
Hebrew
and Yiddish
Yiddish
noun meaning festive occasion
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Simcha
Simcha (Hebrew: שִׂמְחָה‬ śimḥāʰ; Hebrew pronunciation: [simˈχa], Yiddish pronunciation: [ˈsɪmχə]) is a Hebrew word that means gladness, or joy, and is often used as a given name.Contents1 Uses1.1 Holidays 1.2 Other uses2 Name 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksUses[edit] Main article: Happiness in Judaism The concept of simcha is an important one in Jewish philosophy. A popular teaching by Rabbi Nachman of Breslov, a 19th-century Chassidic Rabbi, is "Mitzvah Gedolah Le'hiyot Besimcha Tamid," it is a great mitzvah (commandment) to always be in a state of happiness. When a person is happy they are much more capable of serving God and going about their daily activities than when depressed or upset.[1] Jews often use simcha in its capacity as a Hebrew and Yiddish noun meaning festive occasion
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Beer
Beer
Beer
is one of the oldest[1][2][3] and most widely consumed[4] alcoholic drinks in the world, and the third most popular drink overall after water and tea.[5] Beer
Beer
is brewed from cereal grains—most commonly from malted barley, though wheat, maize (corn), and rice are also used. During the brewing process, fermentation of the starch sugars in the wort produces ethanol and carbonation in the resulting beer.[6] Most modern beer is brewed with hops, which add bitterness and other flavours and act as a natural preservative and stabilizing agent. Other flavouring agents such as gruit, herbs, or fruits may be included or used instead of hops
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Judaism
Judaism
Judaism
(originally from Hebrew יהודה‬, Yehudah, "Judah";[1][2] via Latin
Latin
and Greek) is an ancient, monotheistic, Abrahamic religion with the Torah
Torah
as its foundational text.[3] It encompasses the religion, philosophy and culture of the Jewish people.[4] Judaism
Judaism
is considered by religious Jews
Jews
to be the expression of the covenant that God
God
established with the Children of Israel.[5] Judaism
Judaism
includes a wide corpus of texts, practices, theological positions, and forms of organization. The Torah
Torah
is part of the larger text known as the Tanakh or the Hebrew Bible, and supplemental oral tradition represented by later texts such as the Midrash
Midrash
and the Talmud
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Religion And Happiness
In psychology, happiness is a mental or emotional state of well-being which can be defined by, among others, positive or pleasant emotions ranging from contentment to intense joy.[1] Happy mental states may reflect judgements by a person about their overall well-being.[2] Since the 1960s, happiness research has been conducted in a wide variety of scientific disciplines, including gerontology, social psychology, clinical and medical research and happiness economics. In philosophy, happiness is translated from the Greek concept of eudaimonia, and refers to the good life, or flourishing, as opposed to an emotion.Contents1 Definition 2 Philosophy 3 Religion3.1 Eastern religions3.1.1 Buddhism 3.1.2 Hinduism 3.1.3 Confucianism3.2 Abrahamic religions3.2.1 Judaism 3.2.2 Roman Catholicism3.3 Islam4 Psychology4.1 Theories4.1.1 Maslow's hierarchy of needs 4.1.2 Self-determination theory 4.1.3 Positive psychology4.2 Measu
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Israelis
Israelis
Israelis
(Hebrew: ישראלים‬ Yiśraʾelim, Arabic: الإسرائيليين‎ al-ʾIsrāʾīliyyin) are citizens or permanent residents of the State of Israel, a multiethnic state populated by people of different ethnic backgrounds. The largest ethnic groups in Israel
Israel
are Jews
Jews
(75%), followed by Arabs (20%) and other minorities (5%).[17] Among the Jewish
Jewish
population, hundreds of thousands of Jews
Jews
born in Israel
Israel
are descended from both Ashkenazi and Mizrahi Jews
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Sephardic
Sephardi Jews, also known as Sephardic
Sephardic
Jews
Jews
or Sephardim (Hebrew: סְפָרַדִּים‬, Modern Hebrew: Sfaraddim, Tiberian: Səp̄āraddîm; also יְהוּדֵי סְפָרַד‬ Y'hudey Spharad, lit. "The Jews
Jews
of Spain"), are a Jewish ethnic division whose ethnogenesis and emergence as a distinct community of Jews
Jews
coalesced during the early Middle Ages on the Iberian Peninsula
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Ashkenazi
Ashkenazi Jews, also known as Ashkenazic Jews
Jews
or simply Ashkenazim (Hebrew: אַשְׁכְּנַזִּים‬, Ashkenazi Hebrew pronunciation: [ˌaʃkəˈnazim], singular: [ˌaʃkəˈnazi], Modern Hebrew: [aʃkenaˈzim, aʃkenaˈzi]; also יְהוּדֵי אַשְׁכְּנַז‬ Y'hudey Ashkenaz),[18] are a Jewish diaspora population who coalesced as a distinct community in the Holy Roman Empire around the end of the first millennium.[19] The traditional diaspora language of Ashkenazi Jews
Jews
is Yiddish
Yiddish
(a Germanic language which incorporates several dialects), with Hebrew used only as a sacred language until relatively recently
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Procuring (prostitution)
Procuring or pandering is the facilitation or provision of a prostitute or sex worker in the arrangement of a sex act with a customer.[1] A procurer, colloquially called a pimp (if male) or a madam (if female), is an agent for prostitutes who collects part of their earnings. The procurer may receive this money in return for advertising services, physical protection, or for providing, and possibly monopolizing, a location where the prostitute may engage clients
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Jewish-American Organized Crime
Jewish-American
Jewish-American
organized crime emerged within the American Jewish community during the late 19th and early 20th centuries
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Germany
Coordinates: 51°N 9°E / 51°N 9°E / 51; 9Federal Republic
Republic
of Germany Bundesrepublik Deutschland (German)[a]FlagCoat of armsMotto:  "Einigkeit und Recht und Freiheit" (de facto) "Unity and Justice and Freedom"Anthem: "Deutschlandlied" (third verse only)[b] "Song of Germany"Location of  Germany  (dark green) – in Europe  (green & dark grey) – in the European Union  (green)Location of
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Saxony
The Free State of Saxony[4] (German: Freistaat Sachsen [ˈfʁaɪ̯ʃtaːt ˈzaksn̩]; Upper Sorbian: Swobodny stat Sakska) is a landlocked federal state of Germany, bordering the federal states of Brandenburg, Saxony
Saxony
Anhalt, Thuringia, and Bavaria, as well as the countries of Poland
Poland
(Lower Silesian and Lubusz Voivodeships) and the Czech Republic
Czech Republic
(Karlovy Vary, Liberec and Ústí nad Labem Regions). Its capital is Dresden, and its largest city is Leipzig. Saxony
Saxony
is the tenth largest of Germany's sixteen states, with an area of 18,413 square kilometres (7,109 sq mi), and the sixth most populous, with 4 million people. The history of the state of Saxony
Saxony
spans more than a millennium
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Kosher
Kashrut
Kashrut
(also kashruth or kashrus, כַּשְׁרוּת‬) is a set of Jewish religious dietary laws. Food that may be consumed according to halakha (Jewish law) is termed kosher (/ˈkoʊʃər/ in English, Yiddish: כּשר‎), from the Ashkenazi
Ashkenazi
pronunciation of the Hebrew term kashér (כָּשֵׁר‬), meaning "fit" (in this context, fit for consumption). Among the numerous laws that form part of kashrut are the prohibitions on the consumption of certain animals (such as pork, shellfish [both Mollusca
Mollusca
and Crustacea], and most insects, with the exception of certain species of kosher locusts), mixtures of meat and milk, and the commandment to slaughter mammals and birds according to a process known as shechita
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Happiness In Judaism
Happiness in Judaism and Jewish thought is considered an important value, especially in the context of the service of God.[1] A number of Jewish teachings stress the importance of joy and demonstrate methods of attaining happiness.Contents1 Terminology 2 Tanach 3 Halacha 4 Aggadah4.1 Happiness and prophecy 4.2 Happiness and marriage 4.3 Happiness and politics5 Kabbalah 6 Hasidism 7 Mussar 8 Other rabbinic sources 9 Methods9.1 How Happiness Thinks 9.2 Happiness and Positive Psychology10 See also 11 ReferencesTerminology[edit] There are a number of words in the Hebrew language that denote happiness:Simcha (Hebrew: שמחה‎), a generic word for happiness,[1] also used to describe a celebration (e.g
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Simchat Torah
The culmination of Sukkot
Sukkot
and Shemini Atzeret. Final Parsha
Parsha
from Deuteronomy
Deuteronomy
is read in synagogue. Everyone called to the Torah reading
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