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Silures
The Silures
Silures
were a powerful and warlike tribe or tribal confederation of ancient Britain, occupying what is now south east Wales
Wales
and perhaps some adjoining areas. They were bordered to the north by the Ordovices; to the east by the Dobunni; and to the west by the Demetae.Contents1 Origins 2 Etymology 3 Fierce resistance to Roman forces 4 Romanization 5 The term "Silurian" 6 ReferencesOrigins[edit] According to Tacitus's biography of Agricola, the Silures
Silures
usually had a dark complexion and curly hair. Due to their appearance, Tacitus believed they had crossed over from Spain at an earlier date."... the swarthy faces of the Silures, the curly quality, in general, of their hair, and the position of Spain opposite their shores, attest to the passage of Iberians in old days and the occupation by them of these districts; ..." ( Tacitus
Tacitus
Annales Xi.ii, translated by M
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Siluria, Alabama
Siluria is a former town and now a neighborhood in Alabaster, Alabama, located in Shelby County, Alabama in the Birmingham, Alabama, metropolitan area. It was the home of a large cotton mill and company-built mill village which began operations in 1896 and finally closed in 1979. It was incorporated on 25 May 1954, but was later annexed by Alabaster in May 1971.[2] It's named for the Silurian geological period because of rocks found there.[3] A post office was established in 1872, and remained in operation until it was discontinued in 1972.[4]Contents1 Demographics 2 Notable people 3 References 4 External linksDemographics[edit]Historical populationCensus Pop.%±1960 736—1970 678−7.9%U.S
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Amphitheatre
An amphitheatre or amphitheater /ˈæmfɪˌθiːətər/[1][2] is an open-air venue used for entertainment, performances, and sports. The term derives from the ancient Greek ἀμφιθέατρον (amphitheatron),[3] from ἀμφί (amphi), meaning "on both sides" or "around"[4] and θέατρον (théātron), meaning "place for viewing".[5][6] Ancient Roman amphitheatres
Ancient Roman amphitheatres
were oval or circular in plan, with seating tiers that surrounded the central performance area, like a modern open-air stadium. In contrast both ancient Greek and ancient Roman theatres were built in a semicircle, with tiered seating rising on one side of the performance area. In modern usage, an "amphitheatre" may consist of theatre-style stages with spectator seating on only one side, theatres in the round, and stadia
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Caerleon
Caerleon
Caerleon
(/kərˈliːən/; Welsh: Caerllion) is a suburban town and community, situated on the River Usk[1][2] in the northern outskirts of the city of Newport, Wales. Caerleon
Caerleon
is a site of archaeological importance, being the location of a notable Roman legionary fortress, Isca Augusta, and an Iron Age
Iron Age
hillfort. The Wales
Wales
National Roman Legion Museum and Roman Baths Museum
Roman Baths Museum
are in Caerleon
Caerleon
close to the remains of Isca Augusta
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Calleva Atrebatum
Calleva Atrebatum
Calleva Atrebatum
("Calleva of the Atrebates") was originally an Iron Age settlement, capital of the Atrebates
Atrebates
tribe, and subsequently a town in the Roman province
Roman province
of Britannia.[1] Its ruins lie to the west of, and partly beneath, the Church of St Mary the Virgin, Silchester, in the county of Hampshire
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Silchester
Silchester
Silchester
is a village and civil parish about 5 miles (8 km) north of Basingstoke
Basingstoke
in Hampshire. It is adjacent to the county boundary with Berkshire
Berkshire
and about 9 miles (14 km) south-west of Reading. Silchester
Silchester
is most notable for the archaeological site and Roman town of Calleva Atrebatum, an Iron Age settlement first occupied by the Romans in about AD 45 and includes what is considered the best-preserved Roman wall in Great Britain.Contents1 Location 2 Local government 3 Transport 4 Manor 5 Church and chapel 6 Iron Age & Roman town 7 Amenities 8 School 9 Awards 10 Notable persons 11 References 12 Sources and further reading 13 External linksLocation[edit] The present village is centred on Silchester
Silchester
Common
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Roman Empire
Mediolanum
Mediolanum
(286–402, Western) Augusta Treverorum Sirmium Ravenna
Ravenna
(402–476, Western) Nicomedia
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Forum (Roman)
A forum ( Latin
Latin
forum "public place outdoors",[1] plural fora; English plural either fora or forums) was a public square in a Roman municipium, or any civitas, reserved primarily for the vending of goods; i.e., a marketplace, along with the buildings used for shops and the stoas used for open stalls. Many fora were constructed at remote locations along a road by the magistrate responsible for the road, in which case the forum was the only settlement at the site and had its own name, such as Forum Popili or Forum Livi.[2]Contents1 The functions of a forum 2 Typical forum structures 3 Equivalent spaces in other cultures 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksThe functions of a forum[edit]The Forum of Jerash, in Jordan. The columns mark the location of a stoa, or covered walkway, where the stalls of open-air vendors might be located in bad weather
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Temple
A temple (from the Latin
Latin
word templum) is a structure reserved for religious or spiritual rituals and activities such as prayer and sacrifice. It is typically used for such buildings belonging to all faiths where a more specific term such as church, mosque or synagogue is not generally used in English. These include Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism
Jainism
among religions with many modern followers, as well as other ancient religions such as Ancient Egyptian religion. The form and function of temples is thus very variable, though they are often considered by believers to be in some sense the "house" of one or more deities. Typically offerings of some sort are made to the deity, and other rituals enacted, and a special group of clergy maintain, and operate the temple
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Mars
Mars
Mars
is the fourth planet from the Sun
Sun
and the second-smallest planet in the Solar System
Solar System
after Mercury. In English, Mars
Mars
carries a name of the Roman god of war, and is often referred to as the "Red Planet"[14][15] because the reddish iron oxide prevalent on its surface gives it a reddish appearance that is distinctive among the astronomical bodies visible to the naked eye.[16] Mars
Mars
is a terrestrial planet with a thin atmosphere, having surface features reminiscent both of the impact craters of the Moon
Moon
and the valleys, deserts, and polar ice caps of Earth. The rotational period and seasonal cycles of Mars
Mars
are likewise similar to those of Earth, as is the tilt that produces the seasons
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Guerrilla Warfare
Guerrilla warfare
Guerrilla warfare
is a form of irregular warfare in which a small group of combatants, such as paramilitary personnel, armed civilians, or irregulars, use military tactics including ambushes, sabotage, raids, petty warfare, hit-and-run tactics, and mobility to fight a larger and less-mobile traditional military.[1] Guerrilla groups are a type of violent non-state actor.Contents1 Etymology 2 Strategy, tactics and methods2.1 Strategy 2.2 Tactics 2.3 Unconventional methods 2.4 Growth during the 20th century3 History 4 Counter-guerrilla warfare4.1 Scholarship4.1.1 Classic guidelines 4.1.2 Variants5 Foco
Foco
theory 6 Relationship to terrorism 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksEtymology[edit] The Spanish word "guerrilla" is the diminutive form of "guerra" ("war")
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Brycheiniog
Brycheiniog
Brycheiniog
was an independent kingdom in South Wales
South Wales
in the Early Middle Ages. It often acted as a buffer state between England to the east and the powerful south Welsh kingdom of Deheubarth
Deheubarth
to the west. It was conquered and pacified by the Normans
Normans
between 1088 and 1095, though it remained Welsh in character. It was transformed into the Lordship of Brecknock and later formed the southern and larger part of the historic county of Brecknockshire. To its south was the Kingdom of Morgannwg. The main legacy of the kingdom of Brycheiniog
Brycheiniog
is etymological
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Gwynllwg
Coordinates: 51°41′06″N 3°09′14″W / 51.685°N 3.154°W / 51.685; -3.154 Gwynllŵg was a kingdom of mediaeval Wales
Wales
and later a Norman lordship and then a cantref. Location[edit] It was named after Gwynllyw, its 5th century or 6th century ruler and consisted of the coastal plain stretching between the Rhymney and Usk rivers, together with the hills to the north. It was traditionally regarded as part of the kingdom of Glamorgan
Glamorgan
(Welsh: Morgannwg), rather than that of Gwent which extended only as far westwards as the River Usk. However, under the Laws in Wales
Wales
Acts of 1535-42, the hundred was included with those situated to the east, to form the new county of Monmouthshire.[1] Wentloog
Wentloog
and St. Woolos[edit] The name Gwynllŵg became a marcher lordship (alternatively called Newport)
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King Arthur
King Arthur
Arthur
is a legendary British leader who, according to medieval histories and romances, led the defence of Britain against Saxon invaders in the late 5th and early 6th centuries AD. The details of Arthur's story are mainly composed of folklore and literary invention, and his historical existence is debated and disputed by modern historians.[2] The sparse historical background of Arthur
Arthur
is gleaned from various sources, including the Annales Cambriae, the Historia Brittonum, and the writings of Gildas. Arthur's name also occurs in early poetic sources such as Y Gododdin.[3] Arthur
Arthur
is a central figure in the legends making up the Matter of Britain
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Celt
Pontic SteppeDomestication of the horse Kurgan Kurgan
Kurgan
culture Steppe culturesBug-Dniester Sredny Stog Dnieper-Donets Samara Khvalynsk YamnaMikhaylovka cultureCaucasusMaykopEast-AsiaAfanasevoEastern EuropeUsatovo Cernavodă CucuteniNorthern EuropeCorded wareBaden Middle Dnieper Bronze
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South Wales
South Wales (Welsh: De Cymru) is the region of Wales bordered by England and the Bristol Channel to the east and south, and Mid Wales and West Wales to the north and west. The most densely populated region in the southwest of the United Kingdom, it is home to around 2.2 million people.[1] The region contains almost three-quarters of the population of Wales, including the capital city of Cardiff (population approximately 400,000), as well as Swansea and Newport, with populations approximately 250,000 and 150,000 respectively. The Brecon Beacons national park covers about a third of South Wales, containing Pen y Fan, the highest mountain south of Snowdonia. The region is loosely defined, but it is generally considered to include the historic counties of Glamorgan and Monmouthshire, sometimes extending westwards to include Carmarthenshire and Pembrokeshire
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