HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Signaling System 7
A signal as referred to in communication systems, signal processing, and electrical engineering is a function that "conveys information about the behavior or attributes of some phenomenon".[1] In the physical world, any quantity exhibiting variation in time or variation in space (such as an image) is potentially a signal that might provide information on the status of a physical system, or convey a message between observers, among other possibilities.[2] The IEEE
IEEE
Transactions on
[...More...]

"Signaling System 7" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Signal (other)
A signal is a means to convey information. Signal
Signal
or signaling may refer to:Contents1 Science and engineering 2 Computing 3 Communications 4 Transportation 5 Music5.1 Albums 5.2 Songs6 Arts and entertainment 7 Places7.1 United States8 Other uses 9 See alsoScience and engineering[edit]Analog signal Audio signal Digital signal (electronics) Digital signal (signal processing) Cell signaling, in biology Signalling (economics), in economics theory Signalling theory, in evolutionary biology Time signalComputing[edit]SIGNAL (progr
[...More...]

"Signal (other)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Digital Signal Processing
Digital signal processing
Digital signal processing
(DSP) is the use of digital processing, such as by computers or more specialized digital signal processors, to perform a wide variety of signal processing operations. The signals processed in this manner are a sequence of numbers that represent samples of a continuous variable in a domain such as time, space, or frequency. Digital signal processing
Digital signal processing
and analog signal processing are subfields of signal processing. DSP applications include audio and speech processing, sonar, radar and other sensor array processing, spectral density estimation, statistical signal processing, digital image processing, signal processing for telecommunications, control systems, biomedical engineering, seismology, among others. DSP can involve linear or nonlinear operations
[...More...]

"Digital Signal Processing" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

User Interface
The user interface (UI), in the industrial design field of human–computer interaction, is the space where interactions between humans and machines occur. The goal of this interaction is to allow effective operation and control of the machine from the human end, whilst the machine simultaneously feeds back information that aids the operators' decision-making process. Examples of this broad concept of user interfaces include the interactive aspects of computer operating systems, hand tools, heavy machinery operator controls, and process controls. The design considerations applicable when creating user interfaces are related to or involve such disciplines as ergonomics and psychology. Generally, the goal of user interface design is to produce a user interface which makes it easy (self-explanatory), efficient, and enjoyable (user-friendly) to operate a machine in the way which produces the desired result
[...More...]

"User Interface" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Mary Had A Little Lamb
"Mary Had a Little Lamb" is an English language
English language
nursery rhyme of the early nineteenth-century American origin. It has a Roud Folk Song Index number of 7622.Contents1 Background 2 Text 3 Influence 4 Media 5 Uses of the music 6 See also 7 ReferencesBackground[edit]The Redstone School (1798), now in Sudbury, Massachusetts, is believed to be the schoolhouse mentioned in the nursery rhyme.The nursery rhyme was first published by the Boston publishing firm Marsh, Capen & Lyon, as an poem by Sarah Josepha Hale
Sarah Josepha Hale
on May 24, 1830, and was possibly inspired by an actual incident.[1] There are competing theories on the origin and inspiration of this poem
[...More...]

"Mary Had A Little Lamb" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Telephone
A telephone, or phone, is a telecommunications device that permits two or more users to conduct a conversation when they are too far apart to be heard directly. A telephone converts sound, typically and most efficiently the human voice, into electronic signals that are transmitted via cables and other communication channels to another telephone which reproduces the sound to the receiving user. In 1876, Scottish emigrant Alexander Graham Bell
Alexander Graham Bell
was the first to be granted a United States patent for a device that produced clearly intelligible replication of the human voice. This instrument was further developed by many others. The telephone was the first device in history that enabled people to talk directly with each other across large distances
[...More...]

"Telephone" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Volt
The volt (symbol: V) is the derived unit for electric potential, electric potential difference (voltage), and electromotive force.[1] It is named after the Italian physicist Alessandro Volta (1745–1827).Contents1 Definition1.1 Josephson junction definition2 Water-flow analogy 3 Common voltages 4 History 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksDefinition[edit] One volt is defined as the difference in electric potential between two points of a conducting wire when an electric current of one ampere dissipates one watt of power between those points.[2] It is also equal to the potential difference between two parallel, infinite planes spaced 1 meter apart that create an electric field of 1 newton per coulomb. Additionally, it is the potential difference between two points that will impart one joule of energy per coulomb of charge that passes through it
[...More...]

"Volt" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Signaling (telecommunications)
In telecommunication, signaling has the following meanings:the use of signals for controlling communications, the information exchange concerning the establishment and control of a telecommunication circuit and the management of the network, in contrast to manual setup of circuits by users or administrators, the sending of a signal from the transmitting end of a telecommunication circuit to inform a user at the receiving end that a message is to be sent.Contents1 Classification1.1 In-band and out-of-band signaling 1.2 Line versus register signaling 1.3 Channel-associated versus common-channel signaling 1.4 Compelled signaling 1.5 Subscriber versus trunk signaling2 Examples 3 See also 4 ReferencesClassification[edit] Signaling systems may be classified based on several principal characteristics. In-band and out-of-band signaling[edit] In the public switched telephone network (PSTN), in-band signaling is the exchange of call control information w
[...More...]

"Signaling (telecommunications)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Common-channel Signaling
In telephony, common-channel signaling (CCS),[1] in the US also common-channel interoffice signaling (CCIS),[2] is the transmission of signaling information (control information) on a separate channel than the data, and, more specifically, where that signaling channel controls multiple data channels.[3] For example, in the public switched telephone network (PSTN) one channel of a communications link is typically used for the sole purpose of carrying signaling for establishment and tear down of telephone calls. The remaining channels are used entirely for the transmission of voice data
[...More...]

"Common-channel Signaling" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Discrete-time Signal
A discrete signal or discrete-time signal is a time series consisting of a sequence of quantities. Unlike a continuous-time signal, a discrete-time signal is not a function of a continuous argument; however, it may have been obtained by sampling from a continuous-time signal
[...More...]

"Discrete-time Signal" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Time Series
A time series is a series of data points indexed (or listed or graphed) in time order. Most commonly, a time series is a sequence taken at successive equally spaced points in time. Thus it is a sequence of discrete-time data. Examples of time series are heights of ocean tides, counts of sunspots, and the daily closing value of the Dow Jones Industrial Average. Time
Time
series are very frequently plotted via line charts. Time
Time
series are used in statistics, signal processing, pattern recognition, econometrics, mathematical finance, weather forecasting, earthquake prediction, electroencephalography, control engineering, astronomy, communications engineering, and largely in any domain of applied science and engineering which involves temporal measurements. Time
Time
series analysis comprises methods for analyzing time series data in order to extract meaningful statistics and other characteristics of the data
[...More...]

"Time Series" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Continuous-time Signal
A continuous signal or a continuous-time signal is a varying quantity (a signal) whose domain, which is often time, is a continuum (e.g., a connected interval of the reals). That is, the function's domain is an uncountable set. The function itself need not be continuous. To contrast, a discrete time signal has a countable domain, like the natural numbers. A signal of continuous amplitude and time is known as a continuous-time signal or an analog signal. This (a signal) will have some value at every instant of time. The electrical signals derived in proportion with the physical quantities such as temperature, pressure, sound etc. are generally continuous signals. Other examples of continuous signals are sine wave, cosine wave, triangular wave etc. The signal is defined over a domain, which may or may not be finite, and there is a functional mapping from the domain to the value of the signal
[...More...]

"Continuous-time Signal" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Continuous Function
In mathematics, a continuous function is a function for which sufficiently small changes in the input result in arbitrarily small changes in the output. Otherwise, a function is said to be a discontinuous function. A continuous function with a continuous inverse function is called a homeomorphism. Continuity of functions is one of the core concepts of topology, which is treated in full generality below. The introductory portion of this article focuses on the special case where the inputs and outputs of functions are real numbers. A stronger form of continuity is uniform continuity. In addition, this article discusses the definition for the more general case of functions between two metric spaces. In order theory, especially in domain theory, one considers a notion of continuity known as Scott continuity. Other forms of continuity do exist but they are not discussed in this article. As an example, consider the function h(t), which describes the height of a growing flower at time t
[...More...]

"Continuous Function" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Digital Signal (signal Processing)
In the context of digital signal processing (DSP), a digital signal is a discrete-time signal for which not only the time but also the amplitude has discrete values; in other words, its samples take on only values from a discrete set (a countable set that can be mapped one-to-one to a subset of integers). If that discrete set is finite, the discrete values can be represented with digital words of a finite width
[...More...]

"Digital Signal (signal Processing)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Computer Engineering
Computer engineering
Computer engineering
is a discipline that integrates several fields of electrical engineering and computer science required to develop computer hardware and software.[1] Computer engineers usually have training in electronic engineering (or electrical engineering), software design, and hardware–software integration instead of only software engineering or electronic engineering. Computer engineers are involved in many hardware and software aspects of computing, from the design of individual microcontrollers, microprocessors, personal computers, and supercomputers, to circuit design
[...More...]

"Computer Engineering" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Digital Modulation
In electronics and telecommunications, modulation is the process of varying one or more properties of a periodic waveform, called the carrier signal, with a modulating signal that typically contains information to be transmitted. Most radio systems in the 20th century used frequency modulation (FM) or amplitude modulation (AM) to make the carrier carry the radio broadcast. In general telecommunications, modulation is a process of conveying message signal, for example, a digital bit stream or an analog audio signal, inside another signal that can be physically transmitted. Modulation
Modulation
of a sine waveform transforms a narrow frequency range baseband message signal into a moderate to high frequency range passband signal, one that can pass through a filter. A modulator is a device that performs modulation. A demodulator (sometimes detector or demod) is a device that performs demodulation, the inverse of modulation
[...More...]

"Digital Modulation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.