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Sidney Drell
Sidney David Drell (September 13, 1926 – December 21, 2016) was an American theoretical physicist and arms control expert. At the time of his death, he was professor emeritus at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) and senior fellow at Stanford University's Hoover Institution. Drell was a noted contributor in the fields of quantum electrodynamics and high-energy particle physics. The Drell–Yan process
Drell–Yan process
is partially named for him.Contents1 Biography 2 Awards and honors 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Born in Atlantic City, New Jersey,[1] Drell graduated from Atlantic City High School.[2] He earned his undergraduate degree in physics from Princeton University in 1946, having been admitted at the age of 16.[1] He was awarded a masters in physics in 1947 and received his PhD from the University of Illinois in 1949
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William Grimes (journalist)
William H. "Biff" Grimes (born July 25, 1950) is an American food writer, former magazine writer, culture reporter, theater columnist, restaurant critic, book reviewer and a current obituary writer for The New York Times.[1] He is the author of four books on food and drink in the United States, including the recent work Appetite City: A Culinary History of New York.[2]Contents1 Early life and education 2 Career 3 Awards and honors 4 Personal 5 Bibliography 6 References 7 External linksEarly life and education[edit] Grimes was born in Houston, Texas. In 1973, he obtained a B. A. in English from Indiana University Bloomington
Indiana University Bloomington
where he graduated with honors. In 1974, he received a M. A. in English from the University of Chicago and in 1982 earned his Ph.D.
Ph.D.
in comparative literature
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American Institute Of Physics
The American Institute of Physics
Institute of Physics
(AIP) promotes science, the profession of physics, publishes physics journals, and produces publications for scientific and engineering societies. The AIP is made up of various member societies. Its corporate headquarters are at the American Center for Physics in College Park, Maryland, but the institute also has offices in Melville, New York
Melville, New York
and Beijing.[1]Contents1 Core activities 2 Historical overview 3 Member societies 4 Affiliated societies 5 List of publications 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksCore activities[edit] The focus of the AIP appears to be organized around a set of core activities. The first delineated activity is to support member societies regarding essential society functions. This is accomplished by annually convening the various society officers to discuss common areas of concern
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Particle Physics
Particle
Particle
physics (also high energy physics) is the branch of physics that studies the nature of the particles that constitute matter and radiation. Although the word "particle" can refer to various types of very small objects (e.g. protons, gas particles, or even household dust), "particle physics" usually investigates the irreducibly smallest detectable particles and the fundamental interactions necessary to explain their behaviour. By our current understanding, these elementary particles are excitations of the quantum fields that also govern their interactions. The currently dominant theory explaining these fundamental particles and fields, along with their dynamics, is called the Standard Model. Thus, modern particle physics generally investigates the Standard Model
Standard Model
and its various possible extensions, e.g
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Laureate
In English, the word laureate has come to signify eminence or association with literary awards or military glory. It is also used for winners of the Nobel Prize and the Gandhi Peace Award.Contents1 History1.1 Poet Laureate2 See also 3 ReferencesHistory[edit]Laureate heads on coins, ancient and modern: Above: Vespasian, as Caesar (73 AD); Below: Napoleon I as Emperor (1812). .In ancient Greece, the laurel (Laurus nobilis) was sacred to Apollo and as such sprigs of it were fashioned into a crown or wreath of honor for poets and heroes. This symbolism has been widespread ever since. "Laureate letters" in old times meant the dispatches announcing a victory; and the epithet was given, even officially (e.g. to John Skelton) by universities, to distinguished poets.[1] The name of "bacca-laureate" for a bachelor's degree shows a confusion with a supposed etymology from Latin bacca lauri (the laurel berry), which, though incorrect, involves the same idea
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Princeton University
Princeton University
Princeton University
is a private Ivy League
Ivy League
research university in Princeton, New Jersey
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Palo Alto, California
Palo Alto (/ˌpæloʊ ˈæltoʊ/) is a charter city located in the northwest corner of Santa Clara County, California, United States, in the San Francisco Bay
San Francisco Bay
Area. Palo Alto means tall stick in Spanish; the city is named after a coastal redwood tree called El Palo Alto. The city was established by Leland Stanford Sr.
Leland Stanford Sr.
when he founded Stanford University, following the death of his son, Leland Stanford Jr. Palo Alto includes portions of Stanford University
Stanford University
and shares its borders with East Palo Alto, Mountain View, Los Altos, Los Altos Hills, Stanford, Portola Valley, and Menlo Park
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Federal Government Of The United States
House of RepresentativesSpeaker Paul Ryan
Paul Ryan
(R)Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R)Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi
Nancy Pelosi
(D)Co
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JASON (advisory Group)
JASON is an independent group of elite scientists which advises the United States government on matters of science and technology, mostly of a sensitive nature. The group was first created as a way to get a younger generation of scientists—that is, not the older Los Alamos and MIT Radiation Laboratory
Radiation Laboratory
alumni—involved in advising the government. It was established in 1960 and has somewhere between 30 and 60 members. Its work first gained public notoriety as the source of the Vietnam War's McNamara Line electronic barrier
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Los Alamos National Laboratory
Los Alamos National Laboratory
Los Alamos National Laboratory
(Los Alamos or LANL for short) is a United States
United States
Department of Energy national laboratory initially organized during World War II
World War II
for the design of nuclear weapons as part of the Manhattan Project. It is located a short distance northwest of Santa Fe, New Mexico
New Mexico
in the southwestern United States. Los Alamos was selected as the top secret location for bomb design in late 1942, and officially commissioned the next year. At the time it was known as Project Y, one of a series of laboratories located across the United States
United States
given letter names to maintain their secrecy. Los Alamos was the centre for design and overall coordination, while the other labs, today known as Oak Ridge and Argonne, concentrated on the production of uranium and plutonium bomb fuels
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Barack Obama
Barack Hussein Obama
Obama
II (/bəˈrɑːk huːˈseɪn oʊˈbɑːmə/ (listen);[1] born August 4, 1961) is an American attorney and politician who served as the 44th president of the United States from 2009 to 2017. A member of the Democratic Party, he was the first African American
African American
to be elected to the presidency. He previously served as a U.S. senator
U.S. senator
from Illinois
Illinois
from 2005 to 2008. Obama
Obama
was born in Honolulu, Hawaii. After graduating from Columbia University in 1983, he worked as a community organizer in Chicago. In 1988, he enrolled in Harvard Law School, where he was the first black president of the Harvard Law Review. After graduating, he became a civil rights attorney and an academic, teaching constitutional law at the University of Chicago
Chicago
Law School from 1992 to 2004
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Violin
The violin, also known informally as a fiddle, is a wooden string instrument in the violin family. Most violins have a hollow wooden body. It is the smallest and highest-pitched instrument in the family in regular use. Smaller violin-type instruments are known, including the violino piccolo and the kit violin, but these are virtually unused. The violin typically has four strings tuned in perfect fifths, and is most commonly played by drawing a bow across its strings, though it can also be played by plucking the strings with the fingers (pizzicato) and by striking the strings with the wooden side of the bow (col legno). Violins are important instruments in a wide variety of musical genres. They are most prominent in the Western classical tradition, both in ensembles (from chamber music to orchestras) and as solo instruments and in many varieties of folk music, including country music, bluegrass music and in jazz
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Institute For Advanced Study
The Institute for Advanced Study
Institute for Advanced Study
(IAS) in Princeton, New Jersey, in the United States, is an independent, postdoctoral research center for theoretical research and intellectual inquiry founded in 1930 by American educator Abraham Flexner, together with philanthropists Louis Bamberger and Caroline Bamberger Fuld. The IAS is perhaps best known as the academic home of Albert Einstein, Hermann Weyl, John von Neumann
John von Neumann
and Kurt Gödel, after their immigration to the United States. Although it is close to and collaborates with Princeton University, Rutgers University, and other nearby institutions, it is independent and does not charge tuition or fees.[2] Flexner's guiding principle in founding the Institute was the pursuit of knowledge for its own sake.[3] There are no degree programs or experimental facilities at the Institute
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The New York Times
The New York Times
The New York Times
(sometimes abbreviated as the NYT and NYTimes) is an American newspaper based in New York City
New York City
with worldwide influence and readership.[5][6][7] Founded in 1851, the paper has won 127 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other newspaper.[8][9] The Times
The Times
is ranked 18th in the world by circulation and 3rd in the U.S.[10] The paper is owned by The New York Times
The New York Times
Company, which is publicly traded and is controlled by the Sulzberger family through a dual-class share structure.[11] It has been owned by the family since 1896; A.G
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Stanford University School Of Engineering
Stanford University
Stanford University
School of Engineering
Engineering
is one of the schools of Stanford University. The current dean is Jennifer Widom, the former senior associate dean of faculty affairs and computer science chair.[1] She is the school's 10th dean.Contents1 List of deans 2 Current departments at the school 3 History 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksList of deans[edit]Theodore J. Hoover (1925–1936) Samuel B. Morris (1936–1944) Frederick E. Terman
Frederick E. Terman
(1944–1958) Joseph M. Pettit (1958–1972) William M. Kays (1972–1984) James F. Gibbons (1984–1996) John L. Hennessy
John L. Hennessy
(1996–1999) James D
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University Of Richmond
The University of Richmond
University of Richmond
(UR or U of R) is a private, nonsectarian, liberal arts college located in the city of Richmond, Virginia, with small portions of the campus extending into surrounding Henrico County. University of Richmond
University of Richmond
is a primarily undergraduate, residential university with approximately 4,350 undergraduate and graduate students in five schools: the School of Arts and Sciences, the E
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