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Sickle
A sickle, or bagging hook, is a hand-held agricultural tool designed with variously curved blades and typically used for harvesting, or reaping, grain crops or cutting succulent forage chiefly for feeding livestock, either freshly cut or dried as hay. Falx
Falx
was a synonym but was later used to mean any of a number of tools that had a curved blade that was sharp on the inside edge such as a scythe. Since the beginning of the Iron Age
Iron Age
hundreds of region-specific variants of the sickle have evolved, initially of iron and later steel. This great diversity of sickle types across many cultures can be divided into smooth or serrated blades, both of which can be used for cutting either green grass or mature cereals using slightly different techniques
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Manchester Museum
Manchester
Manchester
Museum is a museum displaying works of archaeology, anthropology and natural history and is owned by the University of Manchester, in England. Sited on Oxford Road (A34) at the heart of the university's group of neo-Gothic buildings, it provides access to about 4.5 million items from every continent. It is the UK's largest university museum and serves both as a major visitor attraction and as a resource for academic research and teaching
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Kerameikos
Kerameikos
Kerameikos
(Greek: Κεραμεικός, pronounced [ce.ɾa.miˈkos]) also known by its Latinized form Ceramicus, is an area of Athens, Greece, located to the northwest of the Acropolis, which includes an extensive area both within and outside the ancient city walls, on both sides of the Dipylon (Δίπυλον) Gate and by the banks of the Eridanos River. It was the potters' quarter of the city, from which the English word "ceramic" is derived, and was also the site of an important cemetery and numerous funerary sculptures erected along the road out of the city towards Eleusis.Contents1 History and description 2 Archaeology 3 Museum 4 Metro station 5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksHistory and description[edit]Inner Kerameikos, view northwest
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German Renaissance
The German Renaissance, part of the Northern Renaissance, was a cultural and artistic movement that spread among German thinkers in the 15th and 16th centuries, which developed from the Italian Renaissance. Many areas of the arts and sciences were influenced, notably by the spread of Renaissance
Renaissance
humanism to the various German states and principalities. There were many advances made in the fields of architecture, the arts, and the sciences. Germany
Germany
produced two developments that were to dominate the 16th century all over Europe: printing and the Protestant Reformation. One of the most important German humanists was Konrad Celtis (1459–1508). Celtis studied at Cologne
Cologne
and Heidelberg, and later travelled throughout Italy collecting Latin and Greek manuscripts. Heavily influenced by Tacitus, he used the Germania to introduce German history and geography
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Combat Manual
Martial arts
Martial arts
manuals are instructions, with or without illustrations, specifically designed to be learnt from a book. Many books detailing specific techniques of martial arts are often erroneously called manuals but were written as treatises. Prose descriptions of martial arts techniques appear late within the history of literature, due to the inherent difficulties of describing a technique rather than just demonstrating it. The earliest extant manuscript on armed combat (as opposed to unarmed wrestling) is Royal Armouries Ms. I.33
Royal Armouries Ms

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Indonesia
Coordinates: 5°S 120°E / 5°S 120°E / -5; 120 Republic
Republic
of Indonesia Republik Indonesia  (Indonesian)FlagNational emblemMotto:  Bhinneka Tunggal Ika
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Bladed Weapon
Bladed and edged weapons[1] have been used throughout history for combat, hunting and in ceremonies. Bladed weapons include swords, knives and, in more recent times, bayonets. Edged weapons are used to hack and slash but, depending on the weapon, to also thrust and stab. Not all swords, knives and bayonets have blades, but points – intended for thrusting rather than slashing. Other dedicated edged weapons include battleaxes and poleaxes.[2] Many edged tools, especially agricultural tools such as axes and scythes, have been used as improvised weapons by peasantry, militia, or irregular forces – particularly as an expedient for defence. Edged weapons and blades are associated with the premodern age but continue to be used in modern armies
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Madurese People
The Madurese (sometimes Madurace or Madhure) also known as Orang Madura
Madura
and Suku Madura
Madura
in Indonesian are an ethnic group originally from the island of Madura
Madura
now found in many parts of Indonesia, where they are the third-largest ethnic group by population. Common to most Madurese throughout the archipelago is the Islamic religion and the use of the Madurese language. The Madurese are a religious ethnicity, often affiliated with Nahdlatul Ulama, a moderate Indonesian Muslim organization. Pesantren has a pivotal role in Madurese life. While the Madurese have their roots on Madura
Madura
off the northeastern coast of Java, the majority of Madurese do not now live on that island
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Panchkhal
Panchkhal
Panchkhal
is a Municipality
Municipality
in Kabhrepalanchok District in the Bagmati Zone of central Nepal. The Panchkhal
Panchkhal
Valley, intermontane basin developed in the southeast of the Kathmandu Valley is located within the eastern flank of a synclinorium in Kavre District . The Jhiku Khola, a tributary of the Sun Koshi River is characterised by development of geomorphic surfaces at different elevations formed after the last glacial retreat in the area
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Soviet Union
The Soviet Union
Soviet Union
(Russian: Сове́тский Сою́з, tr. Sovétsky Soyúz, IPA: [sɐˈvʲɛt͡skʲɪj sɐˈjus] ( listen)), officially the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (Russian: Сою́з Сове́тских Социалисти́ческих Респу́блик, tr. Soyúz Sovétskikh Sotsialistícheskikh Respúblik, IPA: [sɐˈjus sɐˈvʲɛtskʲɪx sətsɨəlʲɪsˈtʲitɕɪskʲɪx rʲɪˈspublʲɪk] ( listen)), abbreviated as the USSR (Russian: СССР, tr. SSSR), was a socialist state in Eurasia
Eurasia
that existed from 1922 to 1991. Nominally a union of multiple national Soviet republics,[a] its government and economy were highly centralized. The country was a one-party state, governed by the Communist Party with Moscow
Moscow
as its capital in its largest republic, the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic
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Urnfield Culture
The Urnfield culture
Urnfield culture
(c. 1300 BC – 750 BC) was a late Bronze Age
Bronze Age
culture of central Europe, often divided into several local cultures within a broader Urnfield tradition. The name comes from the custom of cremating the dead and placing their ashes in urns which were then buried in fields
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Hoard
A hoard or "wealth deposit"[1] is an archaeological term for a collection of valuable objects or artifacts, sometimes purposely buried in the ground, in which case it is sometimes also known as a cache. This would usually be with the intention of later recovery by the hoarder; hoarders sometimes died or were unable to return for other reasons (forgetfulness or physical displacement from its location) before retrieving the hoard, and these surviving hoards might then be uncovered much later by metal detector hobbyists, members of the public, and archaeologists. Hoards provide a useful method of providing dates for artifacts through association as they can usually be assumed to be contemporary (or at least assembled during a decade or two), and therefore used in creating chronologies. Hoards can also be considered an indicator of the relative degree of unrest in ancient societies
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Bronze Age Europe
Diffusion of metallurgy in Europe.Generalized distribution of the Beaker culture
Beaker culture
in the Early Bronze Age.A simplified map of archaeological cultures of the Middle Bronze
Bronze
Age (c. 1500-1400 BC). Blue : Apennine culture, Yellow : Terramare culture, Brown : Tumulus
Tumulus
culture, Red : Atlantic Bronze
Bronze
Age, Green : Nordic Bronze
Bronze
Age, Apple green : Cultures of Unetice tradition, Gray : Balkan cultures.Europe in the Late Bronze
Bronze
Age.The European Bronze Age
Bronze Age
is characterized by bronze artifacts and the use of bronze implements. The regional Bronze Age
Bronze Age
succeeds the Neolithic
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Ancient Near East
Fertile Crescent Mesopotamia Akkadian
Akkadian
Empire Assyria Babylonia Neo-Assyrian Empire Neo-Babylonian Empire SumerEgyptAncient EgyptPersiaAchaemenid Empire Elam MedesAnatoliaHittites Hurrians Neo-Hittite
Neo-Hittite
states UrartuThe Levant
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Bronze Age
The Bronze
Bronze
Age is a historical period characterized by the use of bronze, proto-writing, and other early features of urban civilization. The Bronze
Bronze
Age is the second principal period of the three-age Stone-Bronze- Iron
Iron
system, as proposed in modern times by Christian Jürgensen Thomsen, for classifying and studying ancient societies. An ancient civilization is defined to be in the Bronze
Bronze
Age either by producing bronze by smelting its own copper and alloying with tin, arsenic, or other metals, or by trading for bronze from production areas elsewhere
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Communism
In political and social sciences, communism (from Latin
Latin
communis, "common, universal")[1][2] is the philosophical, social, political, and economic ideology and movement whose ultimate goal is the establishment of the communist society, which is a socioeconomic order structured upon the common ownership of the means of production and the absence of social classes, money[3][4] and the state.[5][6] Communism
Communism
includes a variety of schools of thought, which broadly include Marxism
Marxism
and anarchism (anarcho-communism), as well as the political ideologies grouped around both. All of these share the analysis that the current order of society stems from its economic system, capitalism; that in this system there are two major social classes; that conflict between these two classes is the root of all problems in society; and that this situation will ultimately be resolved through a social revolution
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