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Siatista
Siatista
Siatista
(Greek: Σιάτιστα) is a town and a former municipality in Kozani
Kozani
regional unit, West Macedonia, Greece. Since the 2011 local government reform it is part of the municipality Voio, of which it is the seat and a municipal unit.[2] It lies 28 kilometres (17 miles) southwest of Kozani. The municipal unit has an area of 158.524 km2, the community 94.426 km2.[3] The 2011 census recorded 5,490 residents in the town and 6,247 in the municipal unit.[1] It was built on the austral slope of the Velia mountain on an (average) height of 930 metres (3,051 feet). The first name of the city was Kalyvia, because the city was known for its huts
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[note 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation.[1] To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.[2]Contents1 History 2 Geodetic datum 3 Horizontal coordinates3.1 Latitude
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Political Activism
Activism
Activism
consists of efforts to promote, impede, or direct social, political, economic, or environmental reform or stasis with the desire to make improvements in society. Forms of activism range from writing letters to newspapers or to politicians, political campaigning, economic activism such as boycotts or preferentially patronizing businesses, rallies, street marches, strikes, sit-ins, and hunger strikes. One can also express activism through different forms of art (artivism). Daily acts of protest such as not buying clothes from a certain clothing company because they exploit workers is another form of activism
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Greece
Greece, officially the Hellenic Republic (Greek: Ελληνική Δημοκρατία), also known as Hellas (Greek: Ελλάς), is a sovereign state located in Southern and Southeast Europe. Its population is approximately 10.7 million as of 2018; Athens
Athens
is the nation's capital and largest city, followed by Thessaloniki. Situated on the southern tip of the Balkan Peninsula, Greece
Greece
is located at the crossroads of Europe, Asia, and Africa. It shares land borders with Albania
Albania
to the northwest, North Macedonia
North Macedonia
and Bulgaria
Bulgaria
to the north, and Turkey
Turkey
to the northeast
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Frescos
Fresco
Fresco
(plural frescos or frescoes) is a technique of mural painting executed upon freshly laid, or wet lime plaster. Water
Water
is used as the vehicle for the dry-powder pigment to merge with the plaster, and with the setting of the plaster, the painting becomes an integral part of the wall. The word fresco (Italian: affresco) is derived from the Italian adjective fresco meaning "fresh", and may thus be contrasted with fresco-secco or secco mural painting techniques, which are applied to dried plaster, to supplement painting in fresco
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Icons
An icon (from Greek εἰκών eikōn "image") is a religious work of art, most commonly a painting, from the Eastern Orthodox Church, Oriental Orthodoxy, and certain Eastern Catholic
Eastern Catholic
churches. The most common subjects include Christ, Mary, saints and/or angels. Though especially associated with "portrait" style images concentrating on one or two main figures, the term also covers most religious images in a variety of artistic media produced by Eastern Christianity, including narrative scenes. Icons may also be cast in metal, carved in stone, embroidered on cloth, painted on wood, done in mosaic or fresco work, printed on paper or metal, etc
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Zagreb
Zagreb
Zagreb
(/ˈzɑːɡrɛb/ ZAH-greb, Croatian pronunciation: [zǎːɡreb] ( listen))[7] is the capital and the largest city of Croatia.[8] It is located in the northwest of the country, along the Sava
Sava
river, at the southern slopes of the Medvednica
Medvednica
mountain. Zagreb
Zagreb
lies at an elevation of approximately 122 m (400 ft) above sea level.[9][10] The estimated population of the city in 2018 is 809,773. Zagreb metropolitan area population is slightly above 1.1 million inhabitants and it makes approximately a quarter of a total population of Croatia. Zagreb
Zagreb
is a city with a rich history dating from the Roman times to the present day
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Dimitrija Demeter
In ancient Greek religion and mythology, Demeter
Demeter
(/dɪˈmiːtər/; Attic: Δημήτηρ Dēmḗtēr, pronounced [dɛːmɛ́ːtɛːr]; Doric: Δαμάτηρ Dāmā́tēr) is the goddess of the harvest and agriculture, who presided over grains and the fertility of the earth. Her cult titles include Sito (Σιτώ), "she of the Grain",[1] as the giver of food or grain,[2] and Thesmophoros (θεσμός, thesmos: divine order, unwritten law; φόρος, phoros: bringer, bearer), "Law-Bringer", as a mark of the civilized existence of agricultural society.[3] Though Demeter
Demeter
is often described simply as the goddess of the harvest, she presided also over the sacred law, and the cycle of life and death. She and her daughter Persephone
Persephone
were the central figures of the Eleusinian Mysteries
Eleusinian Mysteries
that predated the Olympian pantheon
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Writer
A writer is a person who uses written words in various styles and techniques to communicate their ideas. Writers produce various forms of literary art and creative writing such as novels, short stories, poetry, plays, screenplays, and essays as well as various reports and news articles that may be of interest to the public. Writers' texts are published across a range of media. Skilled writers who are able to use language to express ideas well often contribute significantly to the cultural content of a society.[1] The term "writer" is also used elsewhere in the arts – such as songwriter – but as a standalone "writer" normally refers to the creation of written language. Some writers work from an oral tradition. Writers can produce material across a number of genres, fictional or non-fictional. Other writers use multiple media – for example, graphics or illustration – to enhance the communication of their ideas
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Poet
A poet is a person who creates poetry. Poets may describe themselves as such or be described as such by others. A poet may simply be a writer of poetry, or may perform their art to an audience.Postmortal fictional portrait of Slovak poet Janko Kráľ
Janko Kráľ
(1822-1876) - an idealized romanticized picture of "how a real poet should look" in Western culture.The Italian Giacomo Leopardi
Giacomo Leopardi
was mentioned by the University of Birmingham as "one of the most radical and challenging of nineteenth-century thinkers".[1]The work of a poet is essentially one of communication, either expressing ideas in a literal sense, such as writing about a specific event or place, or metaphorically
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Dramatist
A playwright or dramatist (rarely dramaturge) is a person who writes plays.Contents1 Etymology 2 History2.1 Early playwrights 2.2 Aristotle's Poetics techniques 2.3 Neo-classical theory 2.4 Well-made play3 Play formats 4 Contemporary playwrights in America 5 New play development in America 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksEtymology[edit] The term is not a variant spelling of the common misspelling "playwrite": the word wright is an archaic English term for a craftsman or builder (as in a wheelwright or cartwright). Hence the prefix and the suffix combine to indicate someone who has "wrought" words, themes, and other elements into a dramatic form - someone who crafts plays
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Croatian Language
Croatian /kroʊˈeɪʃən/ ( listen) (hrvatski [xř̩ʋaːtskiː]) is the standardized variety of the Serbo-Croatian language[6][7][8] used by Croats,[9] principally in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, the Serbian province of Vojvodina
Vojvodina
and other neighboring countries. It is the official and literary standard of Croatia
Croatia
and one of the official languages of the European Union. Croatian is also one of the official languages of Bosnia and Herzegovina, a recognized minority language in Serbia, and neighboring countries. Standard Croatian is based on the most widespread dialect of Serbo-Croatian, Shtokavian, more specifically on Eastern Herzegovinian, which is also the basis of Standard Serbian, Bosnian, and Montenegrin
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Archbishop Of Ohrid
The Archbishop of Ohrid
Ohrid
is a historic title given to the primate of the Archbishopric of Ohrid. The archbishopric was established in 1018 by lowering of the rank of the autocephalous Bulgarian Patriarchate and its subjugation to the jurisdiction of the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople
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Gymnasium (school)
A gymnasium is a type of school with a strong emphasis on academic learning, and providing advanced secondary education in some parts of Europe comparable to British grammar schools, sixth form colleges and US preparatory high schools. In its current meaning, it usually refers to secondary schools focused on preparing students to enter a university for advanced academic study. Before the 20th century, the system of gymnasiums was a wide spread feature of educational system throughout many countries of central, north, eastern, and south Europe. Historically, the German Gymnasium also included in its overall accelerated curriculum post secondary education at college level and the degree awarded substituted for the bachelor's degree (Baccalaureat)[1] previously awarded by a college or university so that universities in Germany became exclusively graduate schools
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First Balkan War
Ottoman Empire:[6] 50,000 killed 100,000 wounded 115,000 captured 75,000 dead of disease Total: 340,000 dead, wounded or captured Bulgaria:[7] 8,840 killed 4,926 missing 36,877 wounded 10,995 dead of disease Greece:[8] 2,373 killed in action or died of wounds 9,295 wounded 1,558 dead of disease or accidents (incl. 2nd Balkan
Balkan
war) Serbia: 5,000 killed 18,000 wounded[9] 6,698 dead of disease Montenegro:[6][10] 2,430 killed 6,602 wounded 406 dead of disease Total: at least c
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Royal Italian Army
The Royal Italian Army
Army
(Italian: Regio Esercito Italiano) was the army of the Kingdom of Italy
Kingdom of Italy
from the unification of Italy
Italy
in 1861 to the birth of the Italian Republic
Italian Republic
in 1946. In World War II
World War II
the Royal Army fought first as part of the Axis (1939–43) and then as a co-belligerent of the Allies (1943–45). After the monarchy ended, the army changed its name to become the Italian Army
Army
(Esercito Italiano).Contents1 History1.1 Origins 1.2 World War I 1.3 Interwar period 1.4 World War II2 Main campaigns2.1 19th century 2.2 20th century3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Origins[edit] The Regio Esercito dates from the proclamation of the Kingdom of Italy, following the unification of Italy
Italy
in 1861 after the Papal States were seized
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