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Shvetsov ASh-82
The Shvetsov
Shvetsov
ASh-82 (M-82) is a Soviet 14-cylinder, two-row, air-cooled radial aircraft engine developed from the Shvetsov
Shvetsov
M-62. The M-62 was the result of development of the M-25, which was a licensed version of the Wright R-1820 Cyclone.Contents1 Design and development 2 Variants 3 Applications 4 Specifications (ASh-82)4.1 General characteristics 4.2 Components 4.3 Performance5 See also 6 References6.1 Notes7 External linksDesign and development[edit] Arkadiy Shvetsov
Shvetsov
re-engineered the Wright Cyclone design, through the OKB-19 design bureau he headed, for Russian aviation engine manufacturing practices and metric dimensions and fasteners, reducing the stroke, dimensions and weight
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Prague Aviation Museum, Kbely
Prague Aviation Museum, Kbely
Kbely
(Letecké Muzeum Kbely) is a major aviation museum located at Prague's original airport at Kbely, 8 km (5.0 mi) north-east of the town centre near Route 10 (E.14).Contents1 Creation of the museum 2 The aircraft collection 3 See also 4 References4.1 Notes 4.2 Bibliography5 External linksCreation of the museum[edit] During the mid 1960s, the Prague Military Museum commenced a programme to recover, restore and preserve historic aircraft from around the country for eventual display at Kbely. Initially, one hangar was used, and about fifty aircraft were placed on public display. The aircraft collection continued to grow, and one of the original Wagner type hangars on the airfield was brought into use, and now contains the earliest aircraft types on display
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Arkadiy Shvetsov
Arkadiy Dmitrievich Shvetsov (Russian: Аркадий Дмитриевич Швецов) (January 25, 1892, Nizhniye Sergi, today's Sverdlovsk Oblast
Sverdlovsk Oblast
- March 19, 1953, Moscow) was a Soviet aircraft engine designer whose OKB was founded in Perm, USSR, in 1934, to produce the Wright Cyclone-derived Shvetsov M-25
Shvetsov M-25
engine. Under Shvetsov, his OKB became the primary provider of radial piston engines for Soviet aircraft industry (Mikulin's and Klimov's OKB were assigned to creation of in-line engines)
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PBY Catalina
The Consolidated PBY Catalina, also known as the Canso in Canadian service, was an American flying boat, and later an amphibious aircraft of the 1930s and 1940s produced by Consolidated Aircraft. It was one of the most widely used seaplanes of World War II. Catalinas served with every branch of the United States
United States
Armed Forces and in the air forces and navies of many other nations. During World War II, PBYs were used in anti-submarine warfare, patrol bombing, convoy escorts, search and rescue missions (especially air-sea rescue), and cargo transport. The PBY was the most numerous aircraft of its kind and the last active military PBYs were not retired from service until the 1980s. In 2014, nearly 80 years after its first flight, the aircraft continues to fly as a waterbomber (or airtanker) in aerial firefighting operations all over the world.Contents1 Naming 2 Design2.1 Background 2.2 Development 2.3 Mass-produced U.S
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Time Between Overhaul
Time between overhaul (abbreviated as TBO or TBOH) is the manufacturer's recommended number of running hours or calendar time before an aircraft engine or other component requires overhaul.[1] On rotorcraft many components have recommended or mandatory TBOs, including main rotor blades, tail rotor blades and gearboxes. For engines the time between overhauls is generally a function of the complexity of the engine and how it is used.[1] Piston-based engines are much more complex than turbine-powered engines, and generally have TBOs on the order of 1,200 to 2,000 hours of running time. They tend toward the lower number if they are new designs, or include boosting options like a turbocharger. In comparison, jet engines and turboprops often have TBOs on the order of 3,000 to 5,000 hours. Since overhauling needs the engine to be taken apart, it is typically expensive
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Petlyakov Pe-2
The Petlyakov Pe-2 (Russian: Петляков Пе-2) was a Soviet light bomber used during World War II. It was regarded[by whom?] as one of the best ground attack aircraft of the war[2] and it was also successful in the roles of heavy fighter, reconnaissance and night fighter.[3] It was similar in many respects to the wooden British de Havilland Mosquito. Pe-2s were manufactured in greater numbers (11,427 built) during the war than any other twin-engined combat aircraft except for the German Junkers Ju 88
Junkers Ju 88
and British Vickers Wellington.[3][4] The Pe-2 was fast, maneuverable and durable. Several Communist nations flew the type after the war, when it became known by the NATO reporting name Buck
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Valvetrain
A valve train or valvetrain is a mechanical system that controls operation of the valves in an internal combustion engine,[1] in which a sequence of components transmits motion throughout the assembly
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Supercharger
A supercharger is an air compressor that increases the pressure or density of air supplied to an internal combustion engine
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Inline Engine (aviation)
In aviation, an inline engine is a reciprocating engine with banks of cylinders, one behind another, rather than rows of cylinders, with each bank having any number of cylinders, but rarely more than six. Inline engine configurations[edit]Straight or Inline Engines with a single bank of cylinders which can be arranged at any angle but typically upright or inverted, (e.g. upright ADC Cirrus, inverted de Havilland Gipsy Major).V Engines with two banks of cylinders with less than 180° between them driving a common crankshaft, typically arranged upright or inverted (e.g. upright Liberty L-12, inverted Argus As 410).[1][2]A W-12 Napier Lion
Napier Lion
engineO or Horizontally Opposed Engines with two banks of cylinders arranged at 180° to each other driving a common crankshaft, almost universally mounted with banks horizontal for aircraft use, or with crankshaft vertical for helicopter use, (e.g
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Propeller Speed Reduction Unit
A propeller speed reduction unit is a gearbox or a belt and pulley device used to reduce the output revolutions per minute (rpm) from the higher input rpm of the powerplant.[1] This allows the use of small displacement internal combustion automotive engines to turn aircraft propellers within an efficient speed range.Contents1 History and operation1.1 Types 1.2 Design variations2 Applications 3 See also 4 References4.1 Notes 4.2 BibliographyHistory and operation[edit] The Wright brothers
Wright brothers
recognised the need for propeller
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Power Density
Power density (or volume power density or volume specific power) is the amount of power (time rate of energy transfer) per unit volume. In energy transformers including batteries, fuel cells, motors, etc., and also power supply units or similar, power density refers to a volume. It is then also called volume power density, which is expressed as W/m3. Volume
Volume
power density is sometimes an important consideration where space is constrained. In reciprocating internal combustion engines, power density—power per swept volume or brake horsepower per cubic centimeter —is an important metric. This is based on the internal capacity of the engine, not its external size. Power densities of common materials[edit]This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it
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Compression Ratio
The static compression ratio of an internal combustion engine or external combustion engine is a value that represents the ratio of the volume of its combustion chamber from its largest capacity to its smallest capacity. It is a fundamental specification for many common combustion engines. In a piston engine, it is the ratio between the volume of the cylinder and combustion chamber when the piston is at the bottom of its stroke, and the volume of the combustion chamber when the piston is at the top of its stroke.[1] For example, a cylinder and its combustion chamber with the piston at the bottom of its stroke may contain 1000 cc of air (900 cc in the cylinder plus 100 cc in the combustion chamber)
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Stroke (engine)
In the context of an Internal combustion engine, the term stroke has the following related meanings:A phase of the engine's cycle (eg compression stroke, exhaust stroke), during which the piston travels from top to bottom or vice-versa. The type of power cycle used by a piston engine (eg two-stroke engine, four-stroke engine). "Stroke length", the distance travelled by the piston in each cycle. The stroke length- along with bore diameter- determines the engine's displacement.Contents1 Phases in the power cycle1.1 Induction/ Intake
Intake
stroke 1.2 Compression stroke 1.3 Combustion/Power/Expansion stroke 1.4 Exhaust stroke2 Types of power cycles2.1 Two-stroke engine 2.2 Four-strokes engine3 Stroke lengthPhases in the power cycle[edit]The phases/strokes of a four-stroke engine. 1: intake 2: compression 3: power 4: exhaustCommonly-used engine phases/strokes (ie those used in a four-stroke engine) are described below
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OKB
OKB is a transliteration of the Russian initials of "Опытное конструкторское бюро" – Opytnoye Konstruktorskoye Buro, meaning Experimental Design Bureau. During the Soviet era, OKBs were closed institutions working on design and prototyping of advanced technology, usually for military applications. A bureau was officially identified by a number, and often semi-officially by the name of its lead designer – for example, OKB-51 was led by Pavel Sukhoi, and it eventually became known as the OKB of Sukhoi. Successful and famous bureaus often retained this name even after the death or replacement of their designers. These relatively small state-run organisations were not intended for the mass production of aircraft, rockets, or other vehicles or equipment which they designed. However they usually had the facilities and resources to construct prototypes
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Wright R-1820 Cyclone
The Wright R-1820 Cyclone
Wright R-1820 Cyclone
9 was an American radial engine developed by Curtiss-Wright, widely used on aircraft in the 1930s through 1950s. It was produced under license in Spain
Spain
as the Hispano-Suiza 9V or Hispano-Wright 9V, and in the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as the Shvetsov
Shvetsov
M-25.Contents1 Design and development 2 Variants2.1 Hispano-Suiza 9V3 Applications3.1 Vehicles4 Engines on display 5 Specifications (GR-1820-G2)5.1 General characteristics 5.2 Components 5.3 Performance6 See also 7 ReferencesDesign and development[edit] The R-1820 Cyclone 9 represented a further development of the Wright P-2 engine dating back to 1925. Featuring a greater displacement and a host of improvements, the R-1820 entered production in 1931
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Polikarpov I-185
The Polikarpov I-185 was a Soviet fighter aircraft designed in 1940. It was flown with three engines but all of them were either insufficiently developed for service use or their full production was reserved for other fighters already in production. The I-185 program was cancelled on 27 January 1943.Contents1 Design and development 2 Variants 3 Specifications (I-185 (M-71 etalon)) 4 See also 5 References5.1 Notes 5.2 BibliographyDesign and development[edit] The I-185, designed in early 1940, was based on the I-180, which was itself a development of the I-16, but was virtually a new design. The monocoque fuselage was similarly built of 'shpon', molded birch plywood, and also had an integral fin, but it was considerably longer than that of the I-180
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