HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Shulaveri-Shomu Culture
Shulaveri-Shomu culture (Georgian: შულავერი-შომუთეფეს კულტურა) is a Late Neolithic/ Eneolithic
Eneolithic
culture that existed on the territory of present-day Georgia, Azerbaijan
Azerbaijan
and the Armenian Highlands.[1] The culture is dated to mid-6th or early-5th millennia BC and is thought to be one of the earliest known Neolithic cultures.[1]Contents1 Type-sites 2 Background 3 Material culture 4 Earliest grapes 5 Geographical links 6 See also 7 References 8 BibliographyType-sites[edit] The name 'Shulaveri-Shomu' comes from the town of Shulaveri, in the Republic of Georgia, known since 1925 as Shaumiani
Shaumiani
(there's also a modern railroad station and village of Shulaveri nearby), and Shomu-Tepe, in the Agstafa District
Agstafa District
of Azerbaijan
[...More...]

"Shulaveri-Shomu Culture" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

South Caucasus
Transcaucasia
Transcaucasia
(Russian: Закавказье), or the South Caucasus, is a geographical region in the vicinity of the southern Caucasus Mountains on the border of Eastern Europe
Eastern Europe
and Western Asia.[1][2] Transcaucasia
Transcaucasia
roughly corresponds to modern Georgia, Armenia, and Azerbaijan
[...More...]

"South Caucasus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Peter N. Peregrine
Peregrine, Latin Peregrinus, is a name originally meaning "one from abroad", that is, a foreigner, traveller, or pilgrim. It may refer to:Contents1 Falcon 2 People 3 Fictional characters 4 Art, music, and literature 5 Military 6 Transportation 7 Business 8 Other uses 9 Peregrinus 10 See alsoFalcon[edit]Peregrine falcon, a bird of preyPeople[edit]Peregrine (martyr) (died 182 AD), Roman Catholic saint Peregrine of Auxerre (martyr) (died c
[...More...]

"Peter N. Peregrine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Obsidian
Obsidian
Obsidian
is a naturally occurring volcanic glass formed as an extrusive igneous rock.[4][5] Obsidian
Obsidian
is produced when felsic lava extruded from a volcano cools rapidly with minimal crystal growth. It is commonly found within the margins of rhyolitic lava flows known as obsidian flows, where the chemical composition (high silica content) induces a high degree of viscosity and polymerization of the lava. The inhibition of atomic diffusion through this highly viscous and polymerized lava explains the lack of crystal growth. Obsidian
Obsidian
is hard and brittle and therefore fractures with very sharp edges
[...More...]

"Obsidian" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Marneuli Municipality
Marneuli
Marneuli
(Georgian: მარნეულის მუნიციპალიტეტი, Azerbaijani: Marneuli Bələdiyyəsi) is a district of Georgia, in the region of Kvemo Kartli. Its main town is Marneuli.Contents1 Location 2 Administrative division 3 Demography 4 Economy 5 Culture 6 ReferencesLocation[edit] Marneuli
Marneuli
District is situated in south-east part of country near to border with Azerbaijan
Azerbaijan
and Armenia. Area of district amounts 935 km².[1] Most part of its territory is located in Marneuli lowland (between 350–600 meters above sea level). Highest point is Garadagh mount (1416 m.) Administrative division[edit] Marneuli
Marneuli
District consists of 2 city ( Marneuli
Marneuli
and Shulaveri) and 72 villages. Largest villages are Sadakhlo
Sadakhlo
and Kizilajlo
[...More...]

"Marneuli Municipality" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mudbrick
A mudbrick or mud-brick is a brick, made of a mixture of loam, mud, sand and water mixed with a binding material such as rice husks or straw. In warm regions with very little timber available to fuel a kiln, bricks were generally sun dried. In some cases brickmakers extended the life of mud bricks by putting fired bricks on top or covering them with stucco.Contents1 Ancient world 2 Adobe 3 Banco 4 Mudbrick
Mudbrick
architecture worldwide 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksAncient world[edit]Mud-brick stamped with seal impression of raised relief of the Treasury of the Vizier. From Lahun, Fayum, Egypt. 12th Dynasty
[...More...]

"Mudbrick" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pottery
Pottery
Pottery
is the ceramic material which makes up pottery wares,[1] of which major types include earthenware, stoneware and porcelain. The place where such wares are made by a potter is also called a pottery (plural "potteries"). The definition of pottery used by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) is "all fired ceramic wares that contain clay when formed, except technical, structural, and refractory products."[2] Pottery
Pottery
is one of the oldest human inventions, originating before the Neolithic
Neolithic
period, with ceramic objects like the Gravettian
Gravettian
culture Venus of Dolní Věstonice
Venus of Dolní Věstonice
figurine discovered in the Czech Republic date back to 29,000–25,000 BC,[3] and pottery vessels that were discovered in Jiangxi, China, which date back to 18,000 BC
[...More...]

"Pottery" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Anthropomorphic
Anthropomorphism
Anthropomorphism
is the attribution of human traits, emotions, or intentions to non-human entities.[1] It is considered to be an innate tendency of human psychology.[2] Personification is the related attribution of human form and characteristics to abstract concepts such as nations, emotions and natural forces like seasons and the weather. Both have ancient roots as storytelling and artistic devices, and most cultures have traditional fables with anthropomorphized animals as characters
[...More...]

"Anthropomorphic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Prismatic Blade
In archaeology, a prismatic blade is a long, narrow, specialized stone flake tool with a sharp edge, like a small razor blade.[1] Prismatic blades are flaked from stone cores through pressure flaking or direct percussion.[2] This process results in a very standardized finished tool and waste assemblage. The most famous and most prevalent prismatic blade material is obsidian, as obsidian use was widespread in Mesoamerica, though chert, flint, and chalcedony blades are not uncommon. Prismatic blades were used for cutting and scraping, and have been reshaped into other tool types, such as projectile points and awls.Contents1 Morphology 2 Production 3 Notes 4 ReferencesMorphology[edit]An obsidian prismatic blade fragment from Chunchucmil, Yucatán, MexicoPrismatic blades are often trapezoidal in cross section, but very close in appearance to an isosceles trapezoid. Triangular blades (in cross-section) are also common
[...More...]

"Prismatic Blade" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Hassuna
Tell Hassuna is a tell, or settlement mound, in the Nineveh Province (Iraq), about 35km south-west of Nineveh. It is the type site for the Hassuna culture (early sixth millennium BCE).Contents1 History of archaeological research 2 Tell Hassuna and its environment 3 Occupation history 4 See also 5 References 6 Further readingHistory of archaeological research[edit] Tell Hassuna was found in 1942 by Fuad Safar, and excavated in 1943 and 1944 by a team from the Iraqi Directorate General of Antiquities led by Seton Lloyd. Excavations revealed that there was once an advanced village culture that was spread throughout northern Mesopotamia. At Hassuna, six different layers of houses were uncovered, revealing various vessels and pottery that date ~5600-5350 BCE, with each layer becoming more substantial
[...More...]

"Hassuna" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Archaeology Of Azerbaijan
Archaeology, or archeology,[1] is the study of human activity through the recovery and analysis of material culture. The archaeological record consists of artifacts, architecture, biofacts or ecofacts, and cultural landscapes. Archaeology can be considered both a social science and a branch of the humanities.[2][3] In North America, archaeology is considered a sub-field of anthropology,[4] while in Europe archaeology is often viewed as either a discipline in its own right or a sub-field of other disciplines. Archaeologists study human prehistory and history, from the development of the first stone tools at Lomekwi in East Africa 3.3 million years ago up until recent decades. Archaeology as a field is distinct from the discipline of palaeontology, the study of fossil remains. Archaeology is particularly important for learning about prehistoric societies, for whom there may be no written records to study
[...More...]

"Archaeology Of Azerbaijan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Melvin Ember
cross-cultural research kinship studies scientific anthropologyAwards Fellow, American Association for the Advancement of ScienceScientific careerFields anthropology, ethnology, cross-cultural studiesInstitutions City University of New York, Human Relations Area FilesAcademic advisors George Peter MurdockMelvin Lawrence Ember (January 13, 1933 – September 27, 2009) was an American cultural anthropologist and cross-cultural researcher with wide-ranging interests who combined an active research career with writing for nonprofessionals.Contents1 Biography 2 Work2.1 Fieldwork 2.2 National Institute of Mental Health 2.3 Cross-cultural work 2.4 Interdisciplinary research 2.5 Publications3 ReferencesBiography[edit] Drawn to anthropology after reading the works of Margaret Mead, he attended Columbia University at the young age of 16 where he was further inspired by Elman Service and Morton Fried in the anthropology department (B.A. 1953)
[...More...]

"Melvin Ember" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Agstafa District
Aghstafa (Azerbaijani: Ağstafa; Russian: Акстафа) is a rayon in the northwestern Azerbaijan.It has two farmland exclaves inside Armenia, Jaradollo both of which came under Armenian control during the Nagorno-Karabakh War.Contents1 Overview1.1 Etymology2 Economy2.1 Demography 2.2 Population3 Education 4 Geographical position 5 Tourism & Historical Monuments5.1 Prehistoric monuments 5.2 Ancient to modern monuments6 Prominent people from Agstafa 7 FootnotesOverview[edit] Agstafa raion was created on 24 January 1939 as an independent administrative unit out of larger Qazakh region of Azerbaijan. On 4 December 1959, the status of the raion was abolished and it was incorporated into Qazakh Rayon. Then on 14 April 1990 by the decree of the Council of Deputees of Azerbaijan
Azerbaijan
SSR, it was split from Qazakh raion and was again re-established as a separate raion. The regional center of the raion is its capital Ağstafa
[...More...]

"Agstafa District" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
[...More...]

"Digital Object Identifier" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.