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Shoeburyness Railway Station
Shoeburyness
Shoeburyness
railway station is the eastern terminus of the London, Tilbury and Southend Railway line ( Engineer's Line Reference
Engineer's Line Reference
FSS)[1], serving the town of Shoeburyness, Essex. It is 39 miles 40 chains (63.57 km) down-line from London Fenchurch Street via Basildon; the preceding station is Thorpe Bay. Its three-letter station code is SRY. It was opened in 1884. The station and all trains serving it are currently operated by c2c.Contents1 Description 2 Services 3 References 4 External linksDescription[edit] Shoeburyness
Shoeburyness
is arranged in a through-station layout despite being a terminus. It was opened on 1 February 1884 by the London, Tilbury and Southend Railway
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National Rail
National Rail
National Rail
(NR) in the United Kingdom is the trading name licensed for use by the Rail Delivery Group, an unincorporated association whose membership consists of the passenger train operating companies (TOCs) of the island of Great Britain
Great Britain
as well as the Isle of Wight that run the passenger services previously provided by the British Railways Board, from 1965 using the brand name British Rail. Northern Ireland, which is linked to the Republic of Ireland, has a different system. National Rail
National Rail
generally does not include services that do not have a BR history; this distinction is important because National Rail services share a ticketing structure and inter-availability that do not necessarily extend to other services
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Engineer's Line Reference
An Engineer's Line Reference
Engineer's Line Reference
(or ELR for short) is a three or four-character code used in the British rail network to refer to a section of a track or route. These references are unique across the whole rail network, allowing identification of any part of the network. Occasionally ELRs are used to refer to other railway infrastructure such as depots.Location designator painted on a railway bridge, showing miles and chainsELRs are usually made up of three letters, identifying the route. Any place on that route can then be referred to by using a combination of the ELR and the mileage of the place, e.g. EJM 13m 16c refers to Plessey Road Level Crossing on the Earsdon Junction (EJ) to Morpeth North Junction (M)
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Mile
The mile is an English unit of length of linear measure equal to 5,280 feet, or 1,760 yards, and standardised as exactly 1,609.344 metres by international agreement in 1959. With qualifiers, "mile" is also used to describe or translate a wide range of units derived from or roughly equivalent to the Roman mile, such as the nautical mile (now 1.852 km exactly), the Italian mile (roughly 1.852 km), and the Chinese mile (now 500 m exactly). The Romans divided their mile into 5,000 feet but the greater importance of furlongs in pre-modern England meant that the statute mile was made equivalent to 8 furlongs or 5,280 feet in 1593. This form of the mile then spread to the British-colonized nations who continue to employ the mile. The US Geological Survey now employs the metre for official purposes but legacy data from its 1927 geodetic datum has meant that a separate US survey mile (6336/3937 km) continues to see some use
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Chain (unit)
A chain is a unit of length that measures 66 feet, 22 yards, 100 links,[1][2]or 4 rods (20.1168 m). There are 10 chains in a furlong, and 80 chains in one statute mile. An acre is the area of 10 square chains (that is, an area of one chain by one furlong). The chain has been used for several centuries in England and in some other countries influenced by English practice. In Scotland a chain was 74 feet. By extension, chainage (running distance) is the distance along a curved or straight survey line from a fixed commencing point, as given by an odometer.Contents1 Origin 2 Instrument2.1 Ramsden's chain 2.2 Other instruments3 Contemporary use3.1 Cricket pitches 3.2 Texas
Texas
chain 3.3 Australian and New Zealand
New Zealand
use 3.4 North America4 References 5 External linksOrigin[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources
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Ministry Of Defence (United Kingdom)
The Ministry of Defence (MoD or MOD) is the British government department responsible for implementing the defence policy set by Her Majesty's Government and is the headquarters of the British Armed Forces. The MOD states that its principal objectives are to defend the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and its interests and to strengthen international peace and stability.[3] With the collapse of the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
and the end of the Cold War, the MOD does not foresee any short-term conventional military threat; rather, it ha
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Pig's Bay
Pig's Bay
Pig's Bay
is a coastal area in East Shoebury, a small beachland area in Shoeburyness. The main entrance to the site is at Blackgate Road, Shoeburyness. This is also the gateway to the island of Foulness, the fourth largest island off the coast of England. The bay is the site of MoD Shoeburyness, a military installation established in 1849 and which is still used as a firing range.[1] One of the other uses of the site is the storage and scrapping of old railway vehicles. It has its own private railway network, stretching for around six miles, linked to one of the sidings at Network Rail's Shoeburyness
Shoeburyness
c2c electrical multiple unit depot by means of two unmanned level crossings across Shoeburyness
Shoeburyness
High Street and Blackgate Road, respectively
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Level Crossing
A level crossing is an intersection where a railway line crosses a road or path at the same level,[1] as opposed to the railway line crossing over or under using a bridge or tunnel. The term also applies when a light rail line with separate right-of-way or reserved track crosses a road in the same fashion
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Tribute (ticket)
Tribute is one of the new generation of ticket issuing systems introduced to ticket offices by British Rail
British Rail
during the mid-1990s, prior to the privatisation of the network. PC-based, it is one of several systems trialled with the aim of replacing the aging APTIS system. The original systems was developed by British Rail
British Rail
Business Systems,[1] and was first installed at London St Pancras
London St Pancras
on 21 January 1994.[2] By April 2005, around 250 terminals were in use[3] Following privatisation, development and support was provided to the train operating companies (TOCs) by SchlumbergerSema, until they were bought by Atos
Atos
in 2004. Since the system was launched the software has undergone several major updates - release version 11 is now in use in ticket offices.[4] Today the Tribute software is owned by Atos
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