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Shmelke Of Nikolsburg
Shmelke of Nikolsburg
Shmelke of Nikolsburg
(1726 Chortkiv, Galicia – April 28, 1778 Nikolsburg, Moravia) was one of the great early Chasidic Rebbes. Born Shmuel Horowitz (but commonly known by the diminutive "Shmelke"), he was the oldest son of Rabbi Tzvi Hirsh Horowitz of Chortkiv. A Levite, he traced his lineage back directly to the prophet Samuel who was also a Levite. In their early years, Shmelke and his brother Pinchas - who would also become a famous rabbi - studied Torah together. After traveling to Mezritch and meeting the great chasidic master Dovber of Mezeritch, they became his ardent followers. After serving as rabbi in Ryczywół and Shineva, Shmelke was invited, in 1773, to become the rabbi of Nikolsburg in Moravia, where he served until 1778.[1] On the first day of his being rabbi of Nikolsburg, Abraham Trebitsch a native of Nikolsburg reports him performing a miracle and bringing rain
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Zugot
The Zugot /ˌzuːˈɡoʊt/ (Hebrew: הַזּוּגוֹת‬ haz-zûghôth, "the Pairs"), also called Zugoth /ˈzuːɡɒθ/ or Zugos /ˌzuːˈɡoʊs/ in the Ashkenazi pronunciation, refers both to the two-hundred-year period (c. 170 BCE – 30 CE, Hebrew: תְּקוּפַת הַזּוּגוֹת‬ təqhûphath haz-zûghôth, "Era of the Pairs") during the time of the Second Temple
Second Temple
in which the spiritual leadership of the Jews
Jews
was in the hands of five successions of "pairs" (זוּגוֹת‬ zûghôth) of religious teachers, and to each of these pairs themselves. The zugoth were five pairs of scholars who ruled a supreme court (בֵּית דִּין הַגָּדוֹל‬ bêth dîn hag-gādhôl) of the Jews
Jews
as nasi (נָשִׂיא‬, "prince", i.e. president) and av beit din (אָב בֵּית דִּין‬, "father of Beth Din", i.e
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Sieniawa
Sieniawa
Sieniawa
[ɕeˈɲava], is a town in southeastern Poland. It had a population of 2,127 inhabitants (02.06.2009).[1] Since 1999, Sieniawa has been part of Subcarpathian Province. History[edit] Sieniawa’s history dates back to the 17th century, and the town owes its existence to the once powerful Sieniawski family. It was founded in 1676, on initiative of Voivode
Voivode
of Volhynia
Volhynia
and Starosta of Lwow, Mikolaj Hieronim Sieniawski, who owned enormous estates in eastern lands of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Sieniawa
Sieniawa
was founded in the area which was covered by the village of Dybkow. The Sieniawski family
Sieniawski family
wanted to make it main administrative center of their estates. In ca. 1650, a brick fortress was built on a hill near contemporary Sieniawa
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Rishonim
Rishonim (Hebrew: [ʁiʃoˈnim]; Hebrew: ראשונים‎; sing. ראשון, Rishon, "the first ones") were the leading rabbis and poskim who lived approximately during the 11th to 15th centuries, in the era before the writing of the Shulchan Aruch
Shulchan Aruch
(Hebrew: שׁוּלחָן עָרוּך, "Set Table", a common printed code of Jewish law, 1563 CE) and following the Geonim (589-1038 CE). Rabbinic scholars subsequent to the Shulkhan Arukh are generally known as acharonim ("the latter ones"). The distinction between the rishonim and the geonim is meaningful historically; in halakha (Jewish Law) the distinction is less important. According to a widely held view in Orthodox Judaism, the acharonim generally cannot dispute the rulings of rabbis of previous eras unless they find support from other rabbis in previous eras
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Sassov (Hasidic Dynasty)
The Sassov (also Sassow) Hasidic dynasty began with Rabbi
Rabbi
Moshe Leib Erblich of Sassov (1745–1807), a disciple of Rabbi
Rabbi
Dovber of Mezeritch, the disciple of the Baal Shem Tov, the founder of Hasidism. Sasov
Sasov
was located in Eastern Galicia, and is now in Ukraine.[1] In the late 19th century, the descendants of Reb Moishe Leib of Sassov had become rabbis in other cities. The town people found themselves without a Rebbe. They approached the Sar Shalom of Belz for guidance as to whom to appoint as Rebbe. He advised them to nominate Reb Shlomo of Sassov, who became a great leader in his own merit.Contents1 Current Sasover Rebbes 2 See also 3 External links 4 ReferencesCurrent Sasover Rebbes[edit] There is a Sassover Rebbe in Monsey, New York, Grand Rabbi
Rabbi
Yaakov Tzvi Erblich, who is a son of Grand Rabbi
Rabbi
Moshe Yehudah Erblich (d
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Mordecai Benet
Mordecai ben Abraham Benet (Hebrew: מרדכי בן אברהם בנט‬, also Marcus Benedict; 1753–1829) was a Talmudist and chief rabbi of Moravia born at Csurgó, a small village in the county of Stuhlweissenburg, Hungary.Contents1 A gifted child 2 His works 3 Superiority of his style 4 Views on education 5 Opposes religious reform 6 Jewish Encyclopedia bibliography 7 ReferencesA gifted child[edit] As Benet's parents were very poor and consequently unable to engage a teacher, they sent their son when only 5 years old to his grandmother at Nikolsburg. There Gabriel Markbreiter provided for the tuition of the gifted child for a period of 6 years, and then sent him to Ettingen, Alsace, the rabbi of which place was Markbreiter's brother-in-law. The latter became Benet's teacher, and took great delight in his pupil's wonderful development
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Geonim
Geonim (Hebrew: גאונים‬; Hebrew: [ɡeʔoˈnim]; also transliterated Gaonim- singular Gaon) were the presidents of the two great Babylonian, Talmudic Academies of Sura and Pumbedita, in the Abbasid Caliphate, and were the generally accepted spiritual leaders of the Jewish community worldwide in the early medieval era, in contrast to the Resh Galuta (Exilarch) who wielded secular authority over the Jews in Islamic lands. Geonim is the plural of גאון‬ (Gaon') [ɡaˈʔon], which means "pride" or "splendor" in Biblical Hebrew
Biblical Hebrew
and since the 19th century "genius" as in modern Hebrew. As a title of a Babylonian college president it meant something like "His Excellency". The Geonim played a prominent and decisive role in the transmission and teaching of Torah
Torah
and Jewish law
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Savoraim
A Savora (Hebrew: [savoˈʁa]; Aramaic: סבורא, "a reasoner", plural Savora'im, Sabora'im [savoʁaˈʔim], סבוראים) is a term used in Jewish law and history to signify one among the leading rabbis living from the end of period of the Amoraim
Amoraim
(around 500 CE) to the beginning of the Geonim (around 600 CE). As a group they are also referred to as the Rabbeinu Sevorai or Rabanan Saborai, and may have played a large role in giving the Talmud
Talmud
its current structure
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Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names
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Elimelech Of Lizhensk
Elimelech Weisblum of Lizhensk (1717–March 11, 1787[1]), a Rabbi
Rabbi
and one of the great founding Rebbes of the Hasidic
Hasidic
movement, was known after his hometown, Leżajsk
Leżajsk
(Yiddish: ליזשענסק‎, translit. Lizhensk) near Rzeszów
Rzeszów
in Poland. He was part of the inner "Chevraya Kadisha" (Holy Society) school of the Maggid Rebbe
Rebbe
Dov Ber of Mezeritch (second leader of the Hasidic
Hasidic
movement), who became the decentralised, third generation leadership after the passing of Rebbe
Rebbe
Dov Ber in 1772. Their dissemination to new areas of Eastern Europe led the movement's rapid revivalist expansion. Rebbi Elimelech authored the classic work Noam Elimelech
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Abraham Trebitsch
Abraham ben Reuben Trebitsch (born at Trebitsch, Moravia, about 1760; died at Nikolsburg in the first half of the nineteenth century) was an Austrian-Jewish scholar. He attended the yeshibah of Löb Fischels at Prague in 1775 ("Ḳorot ha-'Ittim," p. 24a), and then settled in Nikolsburg, where he became secretary to the Landesrabbiner. He was the author of "Ḳorot ha-'Ittim," a history of the European monarchs, including the emperors of Austria, from 1741 to 1801 (part i., Brünn, 1801; with additions, under the title "Ḳorot Nosafot," up to the year 1830, by Jacob Bodek, Lemberg, 1841). It deals especially with the history and literature of the Jews in the Austrian states
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Ryczywół, Masovian Voivodeship
Ryczywół is a village (a town in 1409 - 1869) in Masovian Voivodeship, Poland, located in the northern edge of the historic region of Lesser Poland. The village is located along National Road Nr. 79, which goes from Warsaw to Bytom. Ryczywół lies near the confluence of the Radomka and Vistula rivers at the border of Puszcza Stromecka wilderness.[1] The name of the village probably comes from two Polish words - ryczy (bellow) and wół (ox), and comes from herds of cattle, which used to be moved through Ryczywół on the way from Red Ruthenia towards the west. Jan Długosz wrote that in the 13th century Ryczywół already had St. Catherine parish church. In the 14th century, the village belonged to Polish kings, and a royal court was located here. In 1407 it was the seat of a starosta, located in Sandomierz Voivodeship, and two years later Ryczywół was granted town rights by King Władysław Jagiełło
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Acharonim
Acharonim (Hebrew: [ʔaħaʁoˈnim]; Hebrew: אחרונים ‬ Aḥaronim; sing. אחרון‬, Aḥaron; lit. "last ones") is a term used in Jewish law and history, to signify the leading rabbis and poskim (Jewish legal decisors) living from roughly the 16th century to the present, and more specifically since the writing of the Shulchan Aruch (Hebrew: שׁוּלחָן עָרוּך‬, "Set Table", a code of Jewish law) in 1563 CE. The Acharonim follow the Rishonim, the "first ones"—the rabbinic scholars between the 11th and the 16th century following the Geonim and preceding the Shulchan Aruch
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International Standard Name Identifier
The International Standard Name Identifier (ISNI) is an identifier for uniquely identifying the public identities of contributors to media content such as books, television programmes, and newspaper articles. Such an identifier consists of 16 digits. It can optionally be displayed as divided into four blocks. It was developed under the auspices of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) as Draft International Standard 27729; the valid standard was published on 15 March 2012
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Mezhirichi
Mezhirichi (Ukrainian: Вели́кі Межи́річі, translit. Velyki Mezhyrichi) is a village in the Korets
Korets
Raion of the Rivne
Rivne
Oblast, Ukraine. It is located in western Ukraine, 21 kilometres (13 mi) west of Korets
Korets
and 43 kilometres (27 mi) east of Rivne. Local government is administered by Velykomezhyritska village council.[1]Contents1 Names 2 Jewish life in Mezhirichi 3 History and Attractions 4 Gallery 5 Notable People from Mezhirichi 6 References 7 External linksNames[edit] Mezhirichi is also known as Polish: Międzyrzec Korecki, Yiddish: מעזריטש‎ Mezritsh, Hebrew: מזריטש גדול‬. Jewish life in Mezhirichi[edit]Memorial at the execution site of the Jews of the town.Undoubtedly the most significant event in the Jewish community of Mezhirichi was the arrival there of the Maggid, Rabbi Dov Ber
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