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Shingwauk Kinoomaage Gamig
Shingwauk
Shingwauk
Kinoomaage Gamig (University) is an Anishinaabe
Anishinaabe
(Ojibwa) Institute run in conjunction with Algoma University
Algoma University
in Sault Ste. Marie and the Shingwauk
Shingwauk
Education Trust
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Federated School
An affiliated school or affiliated college is an educational institution that operates independently, but also has a formal collaborative agreement with another, usually larger institution that may have some level of control or influence over its academic policies, standards or programs. While a university may have one or several affiliated colleges, it is not necessarily a collegiate university, which is a union or federation of semi-autonomous colleges.Contents1 Examples of affiliated schools by area1.1 United States 1.2 Canada1.2.1 University
University
of Alberta 1.2.2 Laurentian U
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Indian Reserve
WikiProjectIndigenous North AmericansFirst NationsCommons WiktionaryInuitCommons WiktionaryMétisCommons Wiktionaryv t eIn Canada, an Indian reserve (French: réserve autochtone) is specified by the Indian Act as a "tract of land, the legal title to which is vested in Her Majesty, that has been set apart by Her Majesty for the use and benefit of a band."[1] First Nations
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Royal Commission On Aboriginal Peoples
WikiProjectIndigenous North AmericansFirst NationsCommons WiktionaryInuitCommons WiktionaryMétisCommons Wiktionaryv t eThe Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples (RCAP) was a Canadian Royal Commission established in 1991 to address many issues of Aboriginal status that had come to light with recent events such as the Oka Crisis and the Meech Lake Accord. The commission culminated in a final report of 4000 pages, published in 1996.[1] The original report "set out a 20-year agenda for implementing changes."[1]Contents1 Scope 2 Final report 3 Criticism 4 Twenty years later 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksScope[edit] The Commission of Inquiry investigated the evolution of the relationship among Aboriginal peoples (First Nations, Inuit
Inuit
and Métis), the Government of Canada, Indian and Northern Affairs Canada and part of the Culture of Canada
Canada
as a whole
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Aboriginal Self-government In Canada
WikiProjectIndigenous North AmericansFirst NationsCommons WiktionaryInuitCommons WiktionaryMétisCommons Wiktionaryv t eCanadaThis article is part of a series on the politics and government of CanadaGovernmentThe Crown Monarch (Elizabeth II)Governor General (Julie Payette) Monarchy in the provincesLieutenant governorsExecutive (Queen-in-Council) Queen's Privy CouncilPrime minister (Justin Trudeau) Cabinet (29th ministry) Ministries President of the Privy Council Clerk of the Privy Council Privy Council Office Civil ServiceProvincial and territorial executive councilsPremiersLegislative (Queen-in-Parliament) Federal parliamentSenateSpeaker of the Senate Government Leader in the Senate Opposition Leader in the Senate Senate divisionsHouse of CommonsSpeaker of the house Government Leader in the house Opposition Leader in the house
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Indian Act
WikiProjectIndigenous North AmericansFirst NationsCommons WiktionaryInuitCommons WiktionaryMétisCommons Wiktionaryv t eThe Indian Act (An Act respecting Indians, French: Loi sur les Indiens), (the Act) is a Canadian Act of Parliament that concerns registered Indians, their bands, and the system of Indian reserves.[1][2]</ref> First passed in 1876 and still in force with amendments, it is the primary document which defines how the Government of Canada
Government of Canada
interacts with the 614 First Nation bands in Canada and their members. Throughout its long history the Act has been an ongoing subject of controversy and has been interpreted in different ways by both Aboriginal Canadians and non-Aboriginal Canadians
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British Columbia Treaty Process
WikiProjectIndigenous North AmericansFirst NationsCommons WiktionaryInuitCommons WiktionaryMétisCommons Wiktionaryv t eThe British Columbia
British Columbia
Treaty Process (BCTP) is a land claims negotiation process started in 1993 to resolve outstanding issues – including claims to un-extinguished Aboriginal rights
Aboriginal rights
– with British Columbia's First Nations. Two treaties have been implemented under the BCTP. The Nisga'a
Nisga'a
Treaty is considered separate from the Treaty Process because those negotiations began before the BC treaty process was started, and it has been called a blueprint for the current process. To represent the interests of First Nations
First Nations
involved with the process, the First Nations Summit was created
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Idle No More
methods includeCivil disobedience Demonstrations Hunger strikes Internet activism Nonviolent resistance Picketing Transportation blocks Idle No More
Idle No More
is an ongoing protest movement, founded in December 2012 by four women: three First Nations
First Nations
women and one non-Native ally. It is a grassroots movement among the Aboriginal peoples in Canada comprising the First Nations, Métis and Inuit
Inuit
peoples and their non-Aboriginal supporters in Canada, and to a lesser extent, internationally. It has consisted of a number of political actions worldwide, inspired in part by the liquid diet hunger strike of Attawapiskat
Attawapiskat
Chief Theresa Spence[1] and further coordinated via social media
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Missing And Murdered Indigenous Women
Missing and murdered Indigenous women
Missing and murdered Indigenous women
(MMIW) is an issue affecting Indigenous people in Canada
Canada
and the United States, including the First Na
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Indigenous And Northern Affairs Canada
The Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development (DIAND), referred to by its applied title under the Federal Identity Program
Federal Identity Program
as Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada
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Indigenous Canadian Personalities
Demasduit · Robbie Robertson · Adam Beach Crystle Lightning · Tahmoh Penikett · Shannon Baker Michael Greyeyes · Jordin Tootoo · Buffy Sainte-Marie Tagaq · Paul Okalik · Kenojuak Ashevak Tony Whitford · Tom Jackson · Bryan TrottierIndigenous peoples in CanadaFirst Nations Inuit MétisHistoryPaleo-Indians Pre-colonization Genetics Residential schools Indian hospitals Conflicts First Nations InuitPoliticsCrown and Indigenous peoples Treaty rights Health Policy Numbered Treaties Royal Commission Self-government Indian Act British Columbia Treaty Process Idle No More Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women Politics Organizations Case lawIndigenous and Northern Affairs CanadaCultureIndigenous cultures Indigenous personalities Country food MusicDemographicsIndian reserves ABFN MétisAtlantic CA BC MB ON QC SK Territories Pacific Coast


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Country Food
WikiProjectIndigenous North AmericansFirst NationsCommons WiktionaryInuitCommons WiktionaryMétisCommons Wiktionaryv t eCountry food, in Canada, refers to the traditional diets of Indigenous peoples (known in Canada as First Nations, Metis, and Inuit), especially in remote northern regions where Western food
Western food
is an expensive import, and traditional foods are still relied upon.[1][2] [3] The Government of the Northwest Territories estimated in 2015 that nearly half of N.W.T. residents in smaller communities relied on country food for 75% of their meat and fish intake, in larger communities the percentage was lower, with the lowest percentage relying on country foods (4%) being in Yellowknife, the capital and only "large community"
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Indigenous Music Of Canada
WikiProjectIndigenous North AmericansFirst NationsCommons WiktionaryInuitCommons WiktionaryMétisCommons Wiktionaryv t eIndigenous music of Canada
Canada
encompasses a wide variety of musical genres created by Canada's Indigenous people.[1] Before European settlers came to what is now Canada, the region was occupied by a large number of First Nations, including the West Coast Salish and Haida, the centrally located Iroquois, Blackfoot and Huron, the Dene to the North, and the Innu
Innu
and Mi'kmaq in the East and the Cree
Cree
in the North. Each of the Indigenous communities had (and have) their own unique musical traditions
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First Nations In Alberta
WikiProjectIndigenous North AmericansFirst NationsCommons WiktionaryInuitCommons WiktionaryMétisCommons Wiktionaryv t e First Nations
First Nations
in Alberta
Alberta
are indigenous peoples who live in the Canadian province of Alberta. The First Nations
First Nations
are those peoples (or nations) recognized as Aboriginal peoples in Canada
Aboriginal peoples in Canada
excluding the Inuit
Inuit
and the Métis. According to the Canadian census, in 2001 a population of 84,990 Albertans reported a "North American Indian" (i.e
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Indian Health Transfer Policy (Canada)
WikiProjectIndigenous North AmericansFirst NationsCommons WiktionaryInuitCommons WiktionaryMétisCommons Wiktionaryv t eThe Indian Health Transfer Policy of Canada, provided a framework for the assumption of control of health services by Aboriginal Canadians and set forth a developmental approach to transfer centred on the concept of self-determination in health.[1] Through this process, the decision to enter into transfer discussions with Health Canada
Canada
rests with each community
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Métis In Alberta
WikiProjectIndigenous North AmericansFirst NationsCommons WiktionaryInuitCommons WiktionaryMétisCommons Wiktionaryv t e Métis in Alberta
Alberta
are Métis people, descendants of mixed First Nations/native Indian and white/European families, who live in the Canadian province
Canadian province
of Alberta. The Métis are considered an aboriginal group under Canada's constitution
Canada's constitution
but are in some respects separate from the First Nations
First Nations
(though they live in the same regions and have cultural similarities), and have different legal rights. In Alberta, unlike in the rest of Canada, Métis people have negotiated certain lands to be reserved for them, known as Métis Settlements (Metis Betterment Act 1938)
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