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Sherwood Washburn
Sherwood Larned Washburn ((1911-11-26)November 26, 1911 – (2000-04-16)April 16, 2000), nicknamed "Sherry", was an American physical anthropologist and pioneer in the field of primatology, opening it to the study of primates in their natural habitats. His research and influence in the comparative analysis of primate behaviors to theories of human origins established a new course of study within the field of human evolution.Sherwood L
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Lat
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Macaque
See textThe macaques (/məˈkɑːk/ or /məˈkæk/[2]) constitute a genus (Macaca) of Old World monkeys of the subfamily Cercopithecinae. The 23 species of macaques are widespread over the Old World, especially Asia. Macaques are principally frugivorous, although their diet also includes seeds, leaves, flowers, and tree bark, and some, such as the crab-eating macaque, subsist on a diet of invertebrates and occasionally small vertebrates. All macaque social groups are arranged around dominant, matriarchal females.[3]Contents1 Description 2 Social behavior 3 Relation with humans 4 Clones 5 Species 6 Gallery 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksDescription[edit] Aside from humans (genus Homo), the macaques are the most widespread primate genus, ranging from Japan
Japan
to the Indian subcontinent, and in the case of the barbary macaque (Macaca sylvanus), to North Africa and Southern Europe
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Zoology
Zoology
Zoology
(/zuːˈɒlədʒi, zoʊˈɒlədʒi/) or animal biology is the branch of biology that studies the animal kingdom, including the structure, embryology, evolution, classification, habits, and distribution of all animals, both living and extinct, and how they interact with their ecosystems. The term is derived from Ancient
Ancient
Greek ζῷον, zōion, i.e. "animal" and λόγος, logos, i.e. "knowledge, study".[1]Contents1 History1.1 Ancient
Ancient
history to Darwin 1.2 Post-Darwin2 Research2.1 Structural 2.2 Physiological 2.3 Evolutionary 2.4 Classification 2.5 Ethology 2.6 Biogeography3 Branches of zoology 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] Ancient
Ancient
history to Darwin[edit] Conrad Gesner
Conrad Gesner
(1516–1565)
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Archaeology
Archaeology, or archeology,[1] is the study of human activity through the recovery and analysis of material culture. The archaeological record consists of artifacts, architecture, biofacts or ecofacts, and cultural landscapes. Archaeology
Archaeology
can be considered both a social science and a branch of the humanities.[2][3] In North America, archaeology is considered a sub-field of anthropology,[4] while in Europe
Europe
archaeology is often viewed as either a discipline in its own right or a sub-field of other disciplines. Archaeologists study human prehistory and history, from the development of the first stone tools at Lomekwi
Lomekwi
in East Africa
Africa
3.3 million years ago up until recent decades. Archaeology
Archaeology
as a field is distinct from the discipline of palaeontology, the study of fossil remains
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Cultural Anthropology
Cultural anthropology
Cultural anthropology
is a branch of anthropology focused on the study of cultural variation among humans
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Earnest Hooton
Earnest Albert Hooton (November 20, 1887 – May 3, 1954) was an American physical anthropologist known for his work on racial classification and his popular writings such as the book Up From The Ape. Hooton sat on the Committee on the Negro, a group that "focused on the anatomy of blacks and reflected the racism of the time."[2]Contents1 Biography 2 Race2.1 The "Hooton Plan" 2.2 Hooton on African Americans (1930-1940) 2.3 Quotations3 Criticism 4 Footnotes 5 Works 6 Further reading 7 External linksBiography[edit] Earnest Albert Hooton was born in Clemansville, Wisconsin. He was educated at Lawrence University
Lawrence University
in Appleton, Wisconsin. After earning his BA there in 1907, he won a Rhodes Scholarship
Rhodes Scholarship
to Oxford University, which he deferred in order to continue his studies in the United States
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Field Research
Field research
Field research
or fieldwork is the collection of information outside a laboratory, library or workplace setting. The approaches and methods used in field research vary across disciplines. For example, biologists who conduct field research may simply observe animals interacting with their environments, whereas social scientists conducting field research may interview or observe people in their natural environments to learn their languages, folklore, and social structures. Field research
Field research
involves a range of well-defined, although variable, methods: informal interviews, direct observation, participation in the life of the group, collective discussions, analyses of personal documents produced within the group, self-analysis, results from activities undertaken off- or on-line, and life-histories
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Harold Jefferson Coolidge, Jr.
Harold Jefferson Coolidge Jr. (January 15, 1904[1] – February 15, 1985[2]) was an American zoologist and a founding director of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) as well as of the World Wildlife Fund (WWF).[3] Coolidge was born in Boston, Massachusetts; his father Harold Jefferson Coolidge Sr. (1870–1934) was the brother of Archibald Cary Coolidge and Julian Coolidge. Coolidge studied at Milton Academy and at the University of Arizona before entering Harvard. Originally, he had wanted to become a diplomat, like his uncle Archibald Cary Coolidge, but he soon turned to biology, specializing in primatology.[4] After getting a B.S
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Colobine
Colobus Piliocolobus Procolobus Trachypithecus Presbytis Semnopithecus Pygathrix Rhinopithecus Nasalis Simias MesopithecusThe Colobinae
Colobinae
are a subfamily of the Old World monkey
Old World monkey
family that includes 61 species in 11 genera, including the black-and-white colobus, the large-nosed proboscis monkey, and the gray langurs. Some classifications split the colobine monkeys into two tribes, while others split them into three groups. Both classifications put the three African genera Colobus, Piliocolobus, and Procolobus in one group; these genera are distinct in that they have stub thumbs (Greek κολοβός kolobós = "docked"). The various Asian genera are placed into another one or two groups
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Orangutan
Pongo pygmaeus Pongo abelii Pongo tapanuliensis Pongo hooijeri†Range of the three extant speciesSynonymsFaunus Oken, 1816 Lophotus Fischer, 1813 Macrobates Billberg, 1828 Satyrus Lesson, 1840The orangutans (also spelled orang-utan, orangutang, or orang-utang)[1] are three extant species of great apes native to Indonesia
Indonesia
and Malaysia. Orangutans are currently only found in the rainforests of Borneo
Borneo
and Sumatra. Classified in the genus Pongo, orangutans were originally considered to be one species. From 1996, they were divided into two species: the Bornean orangutan
Bornean orangutan
(P. pygmaeus, with three subspecies) and the Sumatran orangutan
Sumatran orangutan
(P. abelii). In November 2017 it was reported that a third species had been identified, the Tapanuli orangutan
Tapanuli orangutan
(P
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American Association Of Physical Anthropologists
The American Association of Physical Anthropologists (AAPA) is an American international scientific society of physical anthropologists, based in the United States. It was formed in 1930, Morris Steggerda was one of its founding members. They have 1,700 members. They publish the American Journal of Physical Anthropology, a peer-reviewed science journal. External links[edit]American Association of Physical AnthropologistsThis article about a scientific organization is a stub
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Lar Gibbon
The lar gibbon ( Hylobates
Hylobates
lar), also known as the white-handed gibbon, is an endangered primate in the gibbon family, Hylobatidae. It is one of the better-known gibbons and is often seen in zoos.Contents1 Taxonomy 2 Physical description 3 Distribution and habitat 4 Diet and dentition 5 Behavior5.1 Vocalisations 5.2 Reproduction6 Conservation 7 References 8 External linksTaxonomy[edit] There are five subspecies of lar gibbon:[1][3]Malaysian lar gibbon, Hylobates
Hylobates
lar lar Carpenter's lar gibbon, H. l. carpenteri Central lar gibbon, H. l. entelloides Sumatran lar gibbon, H. l. vestitus Yunnan lar gibbon, H. l. yunnanensis (possibly extinct)Physical description[edit]The close-up of headThe fur coloring of the lar gibbon varies from black and dark-brown to light-brown, sandy colors. The hands and feet are white-colored, likewise a ring of white hair surrounds the black face
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Langur
Colobus Piliocolobus Procolobus Trachypithecus Presbytis Semnopithecus Pygathrix Rhinopithecus Nasalis Simias MesopithecusThe Colobinae
Colobinae
are a subfamily of the Old World monkey
Old World monkey
family that includes 61 species in 11 genera, including the black-and-white colobus, the large-nosed proboscis monkey, and the gray langurs. Some classifications split the colobine monkeys into two tribes, while others split them into three groups. Both classifications put the three African genera Colobus, Piliocolobus, and Procolobus in one group; these genera are distinct in that they have stub thumbs (Greek κολοβός kolobós = "docked"). The various Asian genera are placed into another one or two groups
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Primates
A primate (/ˈpraɪmeɪt/ ( listen) PRY-mayt) is a mammal of the order Primates (Latin: "prime, first rank").[2][3] In taxonomy, primates include two distinct lineages, strepsirrhines and haplorhines.[1] Primates arose from ancestors that lived in the trees of tropical forests; many primate characteristics represent adaptations to life in this challenging environment. Most primate species remain at least partly arboreal. With the exception of humans, who inhabit every continent,[4] most primates live in tropical or subtropical regions of the Americas, Africa and Asia.[5] They range in typical size from Madame Berthe's mouse lemur, which weighs only 30 g (1 oz), to the eastern gorilla, weighing over 200 kg (440 lb)
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
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