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Shepherdia Canadensis
Shepherdia
Shepherdia
canadensis, commonly called Canada
Canada
buffaloberry, russet buffaloberry,[2] soopolallie, soapberry, or foamberry (Ktunaxa: kupaʔtiǂ,[3]) is one of a small number of shrubs of the genus Shepherdia
Shepherdia
that bears edible berries. The fruit is usually red, but one species has yellow berries. The berries have a bitter taste
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Taxonomy (biology)
Taxonomy (from Ancient Greek τάξις (taxis), meaning 'arrangement', and -νομία (-nomia), meaning 'method') is the science of defining and naming groups of biological organisms on the basis of shared characteristics. Organisms are grouped together into taxa (singular: taxon) and these groups are given a taxonomic rank; groups of a given rank can be aggregated to form a super-group of higher rank, thus creating a taxonomic hierarchy. The principal ranks in modern use are domain, kingdom, phylum (division is sometimes used in botany in place of phylum), class, order, family, genus and species
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KLIX (AM)
KLIX (1310 AM) is a radio station broadcasting a News Talk Information format serving the Twin Falls, Idaho, United States, area. The station is currently owned by Townsquare Media and licensed to Townsquare Media Twin Falls License, LLC. KLIX features programming from Fox News Radio and Premiere Radio Networks.[1] The station's skywave signal has been received in Salt Lake City, Utah,[2] Bonners Ferry, Idaho and Green River, Wyoming.[3] Ownership[edit] In October 2007, a deal was reached for KLIX to be acquired by GAP Broadcasting II LLC (Samuel Weller, president) from Clear Channel Communications as part of a 57 station deal, with a total reported sale price of $74.78 million.[4] What eventually became GapWest Broadcasting was folded into Townsquare Media on August 13, 2010.[5] References[edit]^ "KLIX Facility Record". United States Federal Communications Commission, audio division.  ^ Salt Lake City, Utah DX ^ Green River, Wyoming DX ^ "Deals". Broadcasting & Cable
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Tarpaulin
A tarpaulin (US: /ˈtɑːrpəlɪn/ TAR-pə-lin,[1] UK: /tɑːrˈpɔːlɪn/ tar-PAW-lin[2]), or tarp, is a large sheet of strong, flexible, water-resistant or waterproof material, often cloth such as canvas or polyester coated with polyurethane, or made of plastics such as polyethylene. In some places such as Australia, and in military slang, a tarp may be known as a hootch
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Raspberries
The raspberry (US: /ˈræzˌbɛri/, UK: /ˈrɑːzb(ə)ri, ˈræz-/) is the edible fruit of a multitude of plant species in the genus Rubus
Rubus
of the rose family, most of which are in the subgenus Idaeobatus; the name also applies to these plants themselves
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Coffee
Coffee
Coffee
is a brewed drink prepared from roasted coffee beans, which are the seeds of berries from the Coffea
Coffea
plant. The genus Coffea
Coffea
is native to tropical Africa (specifically having its origin in Ethiopia
Ethiopia
and Sudan) and Madagascar, the Comoros, Mauritius, and Réunion
Réunion
in the Indian Ocean.[2] The plant was exported from Africa to countries around the world. Coffee
Coffee
plants are now cultivated in over 70 countries, primarily in the equatorial regions of the Americas, Southeast Asia, India, and Africa. The two most commonly grown are arabica and robusta. Once ripe, coffee berries are picked, processed, and dried. Dried coffee seeds (referred to as beans) are roasted to varying degrees, depending on the desired flavor
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Saponin
Saponins are a class of chemical compounds found in particular abundance in various plant species. More specifically, they are amphipathic glycosides grouped phenomenologically by the soap-like foaming they produce when shaken in aqueous solutions, and structurally by having one or more hydrophilic glycoside moieties combined with a lipophilic triterpene derivative.[1][2]Contents1 Structural variety and biosynthesis 2 Sources 3 Test 4 Role in plant ecology and impact on animal foraging 5 Ethnobotany 6 Established research bioactivities and therapeutic claims6.1 Bioactivities 6.2 Vaccine
Vaccine
adjuvants 6.3 Nutritional uses 6.4 Use in animal feeding7 See also 8 References 9 External linksStructural variety and biosynthesis[edit] The aglycone (glycoside-free) portions of the saponins are termed sapogenins
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Gastrointestinal
The gastrointestinal tract (digestive tract, digestional tract, GI tract, GIT, gut, or alimentary canal) is an organ system within humans and other animals which takes in food, digests it to extract and absorb energy and nutrients, and expels the remaining waste as feces. The mouth, esophagus, stomach, and intestines are part of the gastrointestinal tract. Gastrointestinal is an adjective meaning of or pertaining to the stomach and intestines. A tract is a collection of related anatomic structures or a series of connected body organs. All bilaterians have a gastrointestinal tract, also called a gut or an alimentary canal. This is a tube that transfers food to the organs of digestion.[1] In large bilaterians, the gastrointestinal tract generally also has an exit, the anus, by which the animal disposes of feces (solid wastes)
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Sapindus
See textSynonymsDittelasma Hook.f.[2] Sapindus
Sapindus
is a genus of about five to twelve species of shrubs and small trees in the Lychee
Lychee
family, Sapindaceae, native to warm temperate to tropical regions in both the Old World
Old World
and New World. The genus includes both deciduous and evergreen species. Members of the genus are commonly known as soapberries[3] or soapnuts because the fruit pulp is used to make soap. The generic name is derived from the Latin
Latin
words sapo, meaning "soap", and indicus, meaning "of India".[4] The leaves are alternate, 15–40 cm (5.9–15.7 in) long, pinnate (except in S. oahuensis, which has simple leaves), with 14-30 leaflets, the terminal leaflet often absent. The flowers form in large panicles, each flower small, creamy white
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Chinook Jargon
Chinook Jargon (also known as chinuk wawa, or chinook wawa) is a revived American indigenous language originating as a pidgin trade language in the Pacific Northwest, and spreading during the 19th century from the lower Columbia River, first to other areas in modern Oregon
Oregon
and Washington, then
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Nathaniel Lord Britton
Nathaniel Lord Britton (January 15, 1859 – June 25, 1934) was an American botanist and taxonomist who co-founded the New York Botanical Garden in the Bronx, New York.Contents1 Early life 2 New York Botanical Garden 3 Scientific research 4 Death and legacy 5 Works 6 References 7 External linksEarly life[edit] Britton was born in New Dorp in Staten Island, New York
Staten Island, New York
to Jasper Alexander Hamilton Britton and Harriet Lord Turner.[1][2] His parents wanted him to study religion, but he was attracted to nature study at an early age. He was a graduate of the Columbia University
Columbia University
School of Mines and afterwards taught geology and botany at Columbia University. He joined the Torrey Botanical Club soon after graduation and was a member his entire life. He married Elizabeth Gertrude Knight, a bryologist, on August 27, 1885
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Natural Resources Conservation Service
Natural Resources Conservation Service
Natural Resources Conservation Service
(NRCS), formerly known as the Soil Conservation Service (SCS) is an agency of the United States Department of Agriculture
Agriculture
(USDA) that provides technical assistance to farmers and other private landowners and managers. Its name was changed in 1994 during the presidency of Bill Clinton to reflect its broader mission. It is a relatively small agency, currently comprising about 12,000 employees[1]. Its mission is to improve, protect, and conserve natural resources on private lands through a cooperative partnership with state and local agencies
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United States Department Of Agriculture
The United States Department of Agriculture
United States Department of Agriculture
(USDA), also known as the Agriculture Department, is the U.S. federal executive department responsible for developing and executing federal laws related to farming, agriculture, forestry, and food. It aims to meet the needs of farmers and ranchers, promote agricultural trade and production, work to assure food safety, protect natural resources, foster rural communities and end hunger in the United States and internationally. Approximately 80% of the USDA's $141 billion budget goes to the Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) program
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Wikidata
Wikidata
Wikidata
is a collaboratively edited knowledge base hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. It is intended to provide a common source of data which can be used by Wikimedia projects such as,[4][5] and by anyone else, under a public domain license. This is similar to the way Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons
provides storage for media files and access to those files for all Wikimedia projects, and which are also freely available for reuse. Wikidata
Wikidata
is powered by the software Wikibase.[6]Contents1 Concepts 2 Development history2.1 Phase 1 2.2 Phase 2 2.3 Phase 33 Reception 4 Logo 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksConcepts[edit]ScreenshotsThree statements from Wikidata's item on the planet Mars
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British Columbia
British Columbia
British Columbia
(BC; French: Colombie-Britannique) is the westernmost province of Canada, located between the Pacific Ocean
Pacific Ocean
and the Rocky Mountains. With an estimated population of 4.8 million as of 2017, it is Canada's third-most populous province. The first British settlement in the area was Fort Victoria, established in 1843, which gave rise to the City of Victoria, at first the capital of the separate Colony of Vancouver
Vancouver
Island. Subsequently, on the mainland, the Colony of British Columbia (1858–1866)
Colony of British Columbia (1858–1866)
was founded by Richard Clement Moody[5] and the Royal Engineers, Columbia Detachment, in response to the Fraser Canyon
Fraser Canyon
Gold Rush
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California Native Plant Society
The California
California
Native Plant Society (CNPS) is a California environmental non-profit organization (501(c)3) that seeks to increase understanding of California's native flora and to preserve it for future generations
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