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Seventh-day Adventist Theology
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Adventism
Adventism
Adventism
is a branch of Protestant
Protestant
Christianity[1] which was started in the United States
United States
during the Second Great Awakening
Second Great Awakening
when Baptist preacher William Miller first publicly shared his belief that the Second Coming
Second Coming
of Jesus Christ
Jesus Christ
would occur at some point between 1843 and 1844. The name refers to belief in the imminent Second Coming
Second Coming
(or "Second Advent") of Jesus
Jesus
Christ. William Miller started the Adventist movement in the 1830s. His followers became known as Millerites. After the Great Disappointment, the Millerite movement split up and was continued by a number of groups that held different views from one another
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John Thomas (Christadelphian)
Dr. John Thomas (April 12, 1805 – March 5, 1871) was an English religious leader, the founder of the Christadelphian
Christadelphian
movement. He was a Restorationist, with doctrines similar in part to some 16th-century Antitrinitarian
Antitrinitarian
Socinians and the 16th-century Swiss-German pacifist Anabaptists.Contents1 Early life 2 Association with Alexander Campbell 3 Christadelphians 4 Legacy 5 Bibliography5.1 Books 5.2 Magazines6 See also 7 References 8 Bibliography 9 External linksEarly life[edit] John Thomas M.D., born in Hoxton Square, Hackney, London, on April 12, 1805,[1] was the son of a Dissenting minister, also named John Thomas. His family is reputed to be descended from French Huguenot refugees.[2] His family moved frequently, as his father took up various pastorships including a congregation in London, a brief stay in northern Scotland, back to London, and then up to Chorley, Lancashire
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Elon Galusha
Elon Galusha
Elon Galusha
(June 18, 1790 – January 6, 1856) was a lawyer and Baptist
Baptist
preacher who was active in reform activities of the early 19th century in New York. He was the son of Jonas Galusha, the 6th and 8th governor of Vermont. He also adopted and promoted the teachings of William Miller.Contents1 Biography 2 Abolitionist activities 3 Millerite connection 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Galusha was born June 18, 1790 in Shaftsbury, Vermont.[1] His father was Jonas Galusha, the governor of Vermont. Galusha received an M. A. from the University of Vermont
Vermont
in 1816, and an M. A
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Apollos Hale
Apollos Hale (1807–1898)[1] was a Methodist Episcopal preacher in New England. He joined the Millerites and contributed significantly as a lecturer, a writer, and co-designer of the widely disseminated "1843 chart". Following the Great Disappointment, he adopted the shut-door doctrine at first, along with Joseph Turner
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Joshua V. Himes
Joshua Vaughan Himes (1805–1895) was a Christian leader and publisher. He became involved with the followers of William Miller and later became a prominent leader in the Advent Christian Church.Contents1 Biography 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Himes was born in Wickford, Rhode Island. His parents intended for him to become an Episcopal priest, but when a business deal went sour he was unable to complete his education and was apprenticed to a cabinetmaker in New Bedford, Massachusetts. At 18 he joined the Christian Connexion
Christian Connexion
church in New Bedford where he was licensed as an exhorter. In November 1825 he married Mary Thompson Handy, and the following year was ordained to the ministry. Over the next few years he pastored several districts in Massachusetts, before becoming pastor of the First Christian Church in Boston in 1830
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Josiah Litch
Josiah
Josiah
(/dʒoʊˈsaɪ.ə/ or /dʒəˈzaɪ.ə/)[1][2] or Yoshiyahu[a] was a seventh-century BCE king of Judah (c. 649–609) who, according to the Hebrew Bible, instituted major religious reforms. Josiah
Josiah
is credited by most biblical scholars with having established or compiled important Hebrew Scriptures
Hebrew Scriptures
during the "Deuteronomic reform" which probably occurred during his rule
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T. M. Preble
Thomas Motherwell Preble (1810–1907) was a Free Will Baptist minister in New Hampshire
New Hampshire
and a Millerite preacher. After accepting the teachings of William Miller, Preble was excommunicated from his church. Preble appears to have accepted the seventh-day Sabbath in 1844, possibly from Frederick Wheeler or someone associated with the Washington, New Hampshire, church. Preble was the first Millerite to advocate the Sabbath in print. In the Feb. 28, 1845, issue of the Hope of Israel, a Seventh-day Adventist periodical in Portland, Maine, was reprinted in tract form in March, 1845, with the title, Tract, Showing That the Seventh Day Should be Observed as the Sabbath. This tract led to the conversion of J. N. Andrews
J. N

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George Storrs
George Storrs
George Storrs
(December 13, 1796 – December 28, 1879) was a Christian teacher and writer in the United States. Biography[edit] George Storrs
George Storrs
was born in Lebanon, New Hampshire
Lebanon, New Hampshire
on December 13, 1796, son to Colonel
Colonel
Constant Storrs (a wheelwright in the Revolutionary Army) and the former Lucinda Howe (his wife). A Congregationalist since age 19, George Storrs
George Storrs
was received into the Methodist Episcopal Church and commenced preaching at age 28; by 1825 Storrs had joined their New Hampshire
New Hampshire
Conference
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John T. Walsh (Adventist)
Dr. John T. Walsh (February 15, 1816 – August 6, 1886) was a minister and Millerite who after the Great Disappointment, led a group of Adventist Millerites. They believed that Christ had returned on October 22, 1844, only invisibly, and that the Millennium had begun on that date. This group organized as the Life and Advent Union
Life and Advent Union
in 1863, which later became part of the Advent Christian Church.Contents1 History of Life and Advent Union 2 See also 3 External links 4 Sources 5 ReferencesHistory of Life and Advent Union[edit] In 1845 the last conference of the Millerites
Millerites
as a body was held in Albany, New York, on April 29. After this conference, the Millerite movement split into three main factions
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Jonas Wendell
Elder Jonas Wendell
Jonas Wendell
(December 25, 1815 – August 14, 1873) of Edinboro, Pennsylvania, was a zealous Adventist preacher following in the spirit of William Miller. Following the "Great Disappointment" Wendell experienced periods of weak faith, as did many Adventists. He eventually recovered his faith after renewing his study of Bible chronology (historic and prophetic) and began to preach extensively throughout Ohio, Pennsylvania, the Virginias, and New England
New England
By the late 1860s he had been studying the chronology of the Bible, and was encouraged by conclusions showing Christ's return would occur in either 1868 or 1873/4. In 1870 Wendell published his views in the booklet entitled The Present Truth, or Meat in Due Season concluding that the Second Advent
Second Advent
was sure to occur in 1873
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Intermediate State
In some forms of Christian eschatology, the intermediate state or interim state refers to a person's "intermediate" existence between one's death and the universal resurrection. In addition, there are beliefs in a Particular judgment
Particular judgment
right after death and a General judgement or Last judgment
Last judgment
after the resurrection. Christians looked for an imminent end of the world and many of them had little interest in an interim state between death and resurrection. The Eastern Church admits of such an intermediate state, but refrained from defining it, so as not to blur the distinction between the alternative definitive fates of Heaven and Hell
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Protestant
Protestantism
Protestantism
is the second largest form of Christianity
Christianity
with collectively more than 900 million adherents worldwide or nearly 40% of all Christians.[1][2][3][a] It originated with the Reformation,[b] a movement against what its followers con
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Premillennialism
Premillennialism, in Christian eschatology, is the belief that Jesus will physically return to the earth (the Second Coming) before the Millennium, a literal thousand-year golden age of peace. The doctrine is called "premillennialism" because it holds that Jesus' physical return to earth will occur prior to the inauguration of the Millennium. Premillennialism
Premillennialism
is based upon a literal interpretation of Revelation 20:1–6 in the New Testament, which describes Jesus' reign in a period of a thousand years. Others, such as many (but not all) in the Eastern Orthodox communion, claim that this passage of Revelation describes the present time, when Christ
Christ
reigns in Heaven with the departed saints; such an interpretation views the symbolism of Revelation as referring to a spiritual battle rather than a physical battle on earth
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Advent Christian Church
The Advent Christian Church, also known as the Advent Christian General Conference, is a "first-day" body of Adventist Christians founded on the teachings of William Miller in 1860. The organization's Executive Director is Reverend Steve Lawson, and its President is Reverend Paul Dean.[5] Headquartered in Charlotte, North Carolina, the functions of its central offices include global missions, leadership development, church health, student ministries, family ministries, and communications efforts.[6] These ministries are under the leadership of the organization's Executive Director, Rev. Steve Lawson,[7] who is accountable to the organization's executive council; a governing board made up of elected representatives from Advent Christian Churches.[8] This board is chaired by the organization's president, Rev. Paul Dean.[9] In addition to the work of the central offices, more localized work is done in five regions of the U.S
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Christadelphians
The Christadelphians
Christadelphians
(/ˌkrɪstəˈdɛlfiənz/) are a millenarian Christian group who hold a view of Biblical Unitarianism. There are approximately 50,000 Christadelphians
Christadelphians
in around 120 countries.[1] The movement developed in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and North America
North America
in the 19th century around the teachings of John Thomas, who coined the name Christadelphian[2][3] from the Greek for "Brethren in Christ".[4][5][6] Claiming to base their beliefs solely on the Bible, Christadelphians differ from mainstream Christianity
Christianity
in a number of doctrinal areas. For example, they reject the Trinity
Trinity
and the immortality of the soul, believing these to be corruptions of original Christian teaching
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