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Seventh-day Adventist Church
DivisionsEast-Central Africa Euro-Africa Euro-Asia Inter-American North American Northern Asia-Pacific Southern Africa-Indian Ocean South American South Pacific Southern Asia Southern Asia-Pacific Trans-European West-Central AfricaPeriodicalsAdventist Review El Centinela Signs of the Times List of Ellen White writingsServiceAdventist Development and Relief Agency Maranatha Volunteers International Pathfinders Adventurers Medical Cadet Corps Seventh-day Adventist educationSecondary schools Higher educationHospitalsMedia ministriesHope Channel Loma Linda Broadcasting Network It Is Written The Voice of Prophecy Three Angels Broadcasting Network Esperanza TVPeopleEllen G. White James White Joseph Bates J. N. Andrews Uriah Smith J. H. Kellogg F. D. Nichol M. L. Andreasen George Vandeman H. M. S. Richards Edward Heppenstall Herbert E
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Christian Conditionalism
In Christian theology, conditionalism or conditional immortality is a concept of special salvation in which the gift of immortality is attached to (conditional upon) belief in Jesus Christ. This doctrine is based in part upon another theological argument, that if the human soul is naturally mortal, immortality ("eternal life") is therefore granted by God as a gift. This viewpoint stands in contrast to the more popular doctrine of the "natural immortality" of the soul. Conditionalism is usually paired with mortalism and annihilationism, the belief that the unsaved will be ultimately destroyed and cease to exist, rather than suffer unending torment in hell
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Secondary Education
Secondary education
Secondary education
covers two phases on the International Standard Classification of Education
Education
scale. Level 2 or lower secondary education (less common junior secondary education) is considered the second and final phase of basic education, and level 3 (upper) secondary education is the stage before tertiary education. Every country aims to provide basic education, but the systems and terminology remain unique to them. Secondary education
Secondary education
typically takes place after six years of primary education and is followed by higher education, vocational education or employment.[1] Like primary education, in most countries secondary education is compulsory, at least until the age of 16. Children typically enter the lower secondary phase around age 11
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United Seventh-Day Brethren
Brethren or The Brethren may refer to:Contents1 Groups and organizations 2 In arts and entertainment 3 See alsoGroups and organizations[edit] Brethren (religious group), any of a number of religious groups Brethren (Australian group), an Australian hip hop group Brethren, an early name of Lindisfarne (band)
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Anabaptist
Anabaptism
Anabaptism
(from Neo-Latin anabaptista,[1] from the Greek ἀναβαπτισμός: ἀνά- "re-" and βαπτισμός "baptism",[2] German: Täufer, earlier also Wiedertäufer[a]) is a Christian movement which traces its origins to the Radical Reformation. The movement is generally seen as an offshoot of Protestantism, although this view has been challenged by some Anabaptists.[3][4][5] Approximately 4 million Anabaptists live in the world today with adherents scattered across all inhabited continents
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Church Of God (Seventh-Day)
Church
Church
most commonly refers to:Christian Church, body of Christians, taken as a whole Church
Church
(congregation), a local congregation of a Christian denomination
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Intermediate State
In some forms of Christian eschatology, the intermediate state or interim state refers to a person's "intermediate" existence between one's death and the universal resurrection. In addition, there are beliefs in a Particular judgment
Particular judgment
right after death and a General judgement or Last judgment
Last judgment
after the resurrection. Christians looked for an imminent end of the world and many of them had little interest in an interim state between death and resurrection. The Eastern Church admits of such an intermediate state, but refrained from defining it, so as not to blur the distinction between the alternative definitive fates of Heaven and Hell
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Josiah Litch
Josiah
Josiah
(/dʒoʊˈsaɪ.ə/ or /dʒəˈzaɪ.ə/)[1][2] or Yoshiyahu[a] was a seventh-century BCE king of Judah (c. 649–609) who, according to the Hebrew Bible, instituted major religious reforms. Josiah
Josiah
is credited by most biblical scholars with having established or compiled important Hebrew Scriptures
Hebrew Scriptures
during the "Deuteronomic reform" which probably occurred during his rule
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Pietism
Pietism
Pietism
(/ˈpaɪ.ɪtɪsm/, from the word piety) was an influential movement in Lutheranism
Lutheranism
that combined its emphasis on Biblical doctrine with the Reformed emphasis on individual piety and living a vigorous Christian life.[1] Although the movement was active exclusively within Lutheranism, it had a tremendous impact on Protestantism
Protestantism
worldwide, particularly in North America and Europe. Pietism
Pietism
originated in modern Germany
Germany
in the late 17th century with the work of Philipp Spener, a Lutheran theologian whose emphasis on personal transformation through spiritual rebirth and renewal, individual devotion and piety laid the foundations for the movement
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John Thomas (Christadelphian)
Dr. John Thomas (April 12, 1805 – March 5, 1871) was an English religious leader, the founder of the Christadelphian
Christadelphian
movement. He was a Restorationist, with doctrines similar in part to some 16th-century Antitrinitarian
Antitrinitarian
Socinians and the 16th-century Swiss-German pacifist Anabaptists.Contents1 Early life 2 Association with Alexander Campbell 3 Christadelphians 4 Legacy 5 Bibliography5.1 Books 5.2 Magazines6 See also 7 References 8 Bibliography 9 External linksEarly life[edit] John Thomas M.D., born in Hoxton Square, Hackney, London, on April 12, 1805,[1] was the son of a Dissenting minister, also named John Thomas. His family is reputed to be descended from French Huguenot refugees.[2] His family moved frequently, as his father took up various pastorships including a congregation in London, a brief stay in northern Scotland, back to London, and then up to Chorley, Lancashire
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Higher Education
Higher education
Higher education
(also called post-secondary education, third level or tertiary education) is an optional final stage of formal learning that occurs after completion of secondary education. Often delivered at universities, academies, colleges, seminaries, conservatories, and institutes of technology, higher education is also available through certain college-level institutions, including vocational schools, trade schools, and other career colleges that award academic degrees or professional certifications. Tertiary education
Tertiary education
at non-degree level is sometimes referred to as further education or continuing education as distinct from higher education. The right of access to higher education is mentioned in a number of international human rights instruments
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Primary Education
. Primary education
Primary education
and elementary education is typically the first stage of formal education, coming after preschool and before secondary education (The first two grades of primary school, Grades 1 and 2, are also part of early childhood education). Primary education
Primary education
usually takes place in a primary school or elementary school. In some countries, primary education is followed by middle school, an educational stage which exists in some countries, and takes place between primary school and high school college
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Premillennialism
Premillennialism, in Christian eschatology, is the belief that Jesus will physically return to the earth (the Second Coming) before the Millennium, a literal thousand-year golden age of peace. The doctrine is called "premillennialism" because it holds that Jesus' physical return to earth will occur prior to the inauguration of the Millennium. Premillennialism
Premillennialism
is based upon a literal interpretation of Revelation 20:1–6 in the New Testament, which describes Jesus' reign in a period of a thousand years. Others, such as many (but not all) in the Eastern Orthodox communion, claim that this passage of Revelation describes the present time, when Christ
Christ
reigns in Heaven with the departed saints; such an interpretation views the symbolism of Revelation as referring to a spiritual battle rather than a physical battle on earth
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Elon Galusha
Elon Galusha
Elon Galusha
(June 18, 1790 – January 6, 1856) was a lawyer and Baptist
Baptist
preacher who was active in reform activities of the early 19th century in New York. He was the son of Jonas Galusha, the 6th and 8th governor of Vermont. He also adopted and promoted the teachings of William Miller.Contents1 Biography 2 Abolitionist activities 3 Millerite connection 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Galusha was born June 18, 1790 in Shaftsbury, Vermont.[1] His father was Jonas Galusha, the governor of Vermont. Galusha received an M. A. from the University of Vermont
Vermont
in 1816, and an M. A
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Apollos Hale
Apollos Hale (1807–1898)[1] was a Methodist Episcopal preacher in New England. He joined the Millerites and contributed significantly as a lecturer, a writer, and co-designer of the widely disseminated "1843 chart". Following the Great Disappointment, he adopted the shut-door doctrine at first, along with Joseph Turner
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Primitive Advent Christian Church
The Primitive Advent Christian Church
Advent Christian Church
is a small body of Adventist Christians which separated from the Advent Christian Church. They have a common early history. Adventists who had adopted the "conditional immortality" views of Charles F. Hudson and George Storrs
George Storrs
formed the Advent Christian Association in Salem, Massachusetts
Salem, Massachusetts
in 1860. Like Primitive Baptists, and Primitive Methodists the Primitive Advent Christian Church uses the modifier Primitive to signify the idea that they represent the original teachings of the church. They differ from the parent body mainly in two points. They observe feet washing as a rite of the church, and they teach that reclaimed backsliders should be baptized (even though they had formerly been baptized)
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