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Seven Buildings
The Seven Buildings
Seven Buildings
were seven townhouses constructed on the northwest corner of Pennsylvania Avenue NW and 19th Street NW in Washington, D.C., in 1796.[1] They were some of the earliest residential structures built in the city. One of the Seven Buildings
Seven Buildings
was the presidential home of President James Madison
James Madison
and his wife, Dolley, after the burning of the White House
White House
in 1814, and later the residence of Martin Van Buren
Martin Van Buren
shortly before and after his inauguration as President. Most of the buildings were demolished in 1959
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Townhouse
A townhouse, or town house as used in North America, Asia, Australia, South Africa and parts of Europe, is a type of terraced housing. A modern town house is often one with a small footprint on multiple floors. The term originally referred in British usage to the city residence (normally in London) of someone whose main or largest residence was a country house.Contents1 Background 2 Europe2.1 UK3 North America 4 Asia, Australia, and South Africa 5 See also 6 Notes 7 Further readingBackground[edit] Historically, a town house was the city residence of a noble or wealthy family, who would own one or more country houses in which they lived for much of the year. From the 18th century, landowners and their servants would move to a townhouse during the social season (when major balls took place).[1] Europe[edit] UK[edit] In the United Kingdom most townhouses are terraced (see Terraced houses in the United Kingdom)
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List Of Secretaries Of State Of The United States
This is a list of Secretaries of State of the United States.Contents1 Secretaries of Foreign Affairs (1781–1789) 2 List of Secretaries of State 3 List of Secretaries of State by time in office 4 Living former Secretaries of State 5 Notes 6 ReferencesSecretaries of Foreign Affairs (1781–1789)[edit] Main article: United States Secretary of Foreign Affairs List of Secretaries of State[edit]Parties  No party (1)   Federalist (6)   Democratic-Republican (6)   Democratic (26)   Whig (5)   Republican (28)Status  Denotes acting Secretary of StateNo. Portrait Name State of Residence Took office Left office President(s)–John Jay[A] Acting New York September 26, 1789 March 22, 1790George Washington1Thomas Jefferson[M] Virginia March 22, 1790 December 31, 17932Edmund J
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East Capitol Street
East Capitol Street
East Capitol Street
is a major street that divides the northeast and southeast quadrants of Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.
It runs due east from the United States
United States
Capitol to the DC-Maryland border. The street is uninterrupted until Lincoln Park then continues eastward to Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Stadium. East of the stadium, East Capitol crosses the Anacostia River
Anacostia River
over the Whitney Young Memorial Bridge
Whitney Young Memorial Bridge
and then goes underneath Route 295 before crossing into Prince George's County, Maryland where it becomes Maryland State Highway 214. The western stretch of East Capitol Street, which passes through the heart of Washington's Capitol Hill neighborhood, includes some of the priciest real estate in the city
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Anacostia River
The Anacostia
Anacostia
River /ænəˈkɒstiə/ is a river in the Mid Atlantic region of the United States. It flows from Prince George's County in Maryland
Maryland
into Washington, D.C., where it joins with the Washington Channel to empty into the Potomac River
Potomac River
at Buzzard Point
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Pennsylvania Avenue (Washington, D.C.)
Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
Avenue is a street in Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.
that connects the White House
White House
and the United States Capitol. Called "America's Main Street",[1] it is the location of official parades and processions, as well as protest marches
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Rock Creek (Potomac River)
Rock Creek is a free-flowing tributary of the Potomac River, which empties into the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
via the Chesapeake Bay. The creek is 32.6 miles (52.5 km) long,[1] with a drainage area of about 76.5 square miles (198 km2). The last quarter-mile (400 m) of the creek is affected by tides.[2]Contents1 Geography 2 Water quality
Water quality
and restoration2.1 Restoration projects3 Tributaries 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksGeography[edit] The creek rises from a spring near Laytonsville in Montgomery County, in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Maryland, and joins the Potomac near Georgetown and the Watergate in Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.
Beginning in the Derwood–Rockville area in Maryland, the creek flows through Rock Creek Regional Park southward to the D.C
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List Of Presidents Of The United States
House of RepresentativesSpeaker Paul Ryan
Paul Ryan
(R)Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R)Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi
Nancy Pelosi
(D)Co
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President Of The United States
House of RepresentativesSpeaker Paul Ryan
Paul Ryan
(R)Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R)Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi
Nancy Pelosi
(D)Co
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United States Secretary Of State
The Secretary of State is a senior official of the federal government of the United States
United States
of America, and as head of the U.S. Department of State, is principally concerned with foreign policy and is considered to be the U.S. government's equivalent of a Minister for Foreign Affairs.[4][5] The Secretary of State is nominated by the President of the United States and, following a confirmation hearing before the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations, is confirmed by the United States Senate. The Secretary of State, along with the Secretary of the Treasury, Secretary of Defense, and Attorney General, are generally regarded as the four most important Cabinet members because of the importance of their respective departments.[6] Secretary of State is a Level I position in the Executive Schedule and thus earns the salary prescribed for that level (currently $205,700).[3] The current acting Secretary of State is John J. Sullivan
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Martin Davis Hardin
Martin Davis Hardin
Martin Davis Hardin
(June 26, 1837 – December 12, 1923) was a brigadier general in the Union Army
Union Army
during the American Civil War. He was appointed a brigadier general on July 6, 1864, to rank from July 2, 1864, the date of U.S. Senate confirmation of his promotion.[1] Martin D. Hardin was born in Jacksonville, Illinois, the son of John J. Hardin. He was a family friend and protégé of Abraham Lincoln. Although widely reported that it was at the Hardin family home that Lincoln first met his wife, Mary Todd, this is most likely false. Lincoln and his future wife probably met in Springfield. Hardin graduated from West Point in the Class of 1859, and was an aide to Robert E. Lee in the hanging of John Brown soon after
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United States House Of Representatives
Majority (238)     Republican (238)Minority (193)     Democratic (193)Vacant (4)     Vacant (4)Length of termTwo yearsElectionsVoting systemFirst-past-the-post in most states; nonpartisan blanket primary with a majoritarian second round in 3 statesLast electionNovember 8, 2016Next electionNovember 6, 2018Redistricting State legislatures or redistricting commissions, varies by stateMeeting placeHouse of Representatives chamber United States
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Congress Of The Confederation
The Congress of the Confederation, or the Confederation Congress, formally referred to as the United States in Congress Assembled, was the governing body of the United States of America
United States of America
that existed from March 1, 1781, to March 4, 1789. A unicameral body with legislative and executive function, it comprised delegates appointed by the legislatures of the several states. Each state delegation had one vote
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Virginia House Of Delegates
Coordinates: 37°32′19″N 77°26′00″W / 37.53865°N 77.43331°W / 37.53865; -77.43331 Virginia
Virginia
House of Delegates Virginia
Virginia
General Assembly


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History Of The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution
United States Constitution
was written in 1787 during the Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Convention. The old Congress set the rules the new government followed in terms of writing and ratifying the new constitution. After ratification in eleven states, in 1789 its elected officers of government assembled in New York City, replacing the Articles of Confederation
Articles of Confederation
government. The original Constitution has been amended twenty-seven times. The meaning of the Constitution is interpreted and extended by judicial review in the federal courts. The original parchment copies are on display at the National Archives Building. Two alternative plans were developed in Convention. The nationalist majority, soon to be called "Federalists," put forth the Virginia Plan, a consolidated government based on proportional representation among the states by population
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27th Amendment To The United States Constitution
The Twenty-seventh Amendment (Amendment XXVII) to the United States Constitution prohibits any law that increases or decreases the salary of members of Congress from taking effect until the start of the next set of terms of office for Representatives. It is the most recent amendment to be adopted, but one of the first proposed. It was submitted by Congress to the states for ratification on September 25, 1789, along with eleven other proposed amendments. While ten of these twelve proposals were ratified in 1791 to become the Bill of Rights, what would become the Twenty-seventh Amendment and the proposed Congressional Apportionment Amendment
Congressional Apportionment Amendment
did not get ratified by enough states for them to also come into force with the first ten amendments
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