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Seven-string Guitar
The seven-string guitar adds one additional string to the more common six-string guitar, commonly used to extend the bass range (usually a low B) or also to extend the treble range. The additional string is added in one of two different ways: by increasing the width of the fingerboard such that the additional string may be fretted by the left hand; or, by leaving the fingerboard unchanged and adding a "floating" bass string. In the latter case, the extra bass string lies next to the existing bass strings, but free of the fingerboard in similar fashion as the archlute and theorbo
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Six-string Guitar
The guitar is a fretted musical instrument that usually has six strings.[1] The sound is projected either acoustically, using a hollow wooden or plastic and wood box (for an acoustic guitar), or through electrical amplifier and a speaker (for an electric guitar). It is typically played by strumming or plucking the strings with the fingers, thumb or fingernails of the right hand or with a pick while fretting (or pressing against the frets) the strings with the fingers of the left hand. The guitar is a type of chordophone, traditionally constructed from wood and strung with either gut, nylon or steel strings and distinguished from other chordophones by its construction and tuning
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Lenny Breau
Leonard Harold Breau (August 5, 1941 – August 12, 1984) was an American-born guitarist and music educator. One of the most admired guitarists of his generation in musician's circles in Canada and the United States, he was known for blending many styles of music, including jazz, country, classical, and flamenco. Inspired by country guitarists like Chet Atkins, Breau used fingerstyle techniques not often used in jazz guitar
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Raphael Rabello
Rafael Baptista Rabello (October 31, 1962 – April 27, 1995), was a virtuoso Brazilian guitarist and composer. During the 1980s and 1990s, he was considered one of the best acoustic guitar players in the world and played with many famous artists, such as Tom Jobim, Ney Matogrosso, Paulo Moura, and Paco de Lucia.[1]Contents1 Biography1.1 Early years 1.2 Early musical career 1.3 Later career and success 1.4 Final years2 Legacy 3 Discography 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Early years[edit] Raphael Rabello was born in Petrópolis, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. He was the youngest child of his family, which included many musicians. His sister Luciana was a well-known cavaquinho player and his other sister, Amélia, became a singer
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Yamandu Costa
Yamandu Costa
Yamandu Costa
(born January 24, 1980 in Passo Fundo), sometimes misspelled Yamandú, is a Brazilian guitarist and composer. His main instrument is the Brazilian seven-stringed classical guitar. Costa began to study guitar at age seven with his father, Algacir Costa, leader of the group Os Fronteiriços (The Frontiersmen) and mastered the instrument after studying with Lúcio Yanel, an Argentine virtuoso who lived in Brazil
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Guitarra Séptima
The guitarra séptima or guitarra sétima is a Mexican guitar with fourteen strings, strung in seven double courses. This guitar is smaller than a six-string guitar and also has less resonance. It had popularity in the 19th century. Some manuscripts have been found, like the one by Antonio Vargas, of 1776 in Veracruz, where a seven double-course guitar is mentioned, as well as methods by José Guarro and Guillermo Gómez. References[edit] INAH
INAH
(1988). Atlas Cultural de México. Música. México: Grupo Editorial Planeta
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Latin) (de facto) "Out of many, one" "Annuit cœptis" (Latin) "He h
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George Van Eps
George Van Eps (August 7, 1913 – November 29, 1998) (often called the Father of the Seven-String Guitar) was an American swing and mainstream jazz guitarist.Contents1 Biography 2 Discography2.1 As leader or co-leader 2.2 As sideman3 Bibliography 4 ReferencesBiography[edit] George Van Eps was born in Plainfield, New Jersey, into a family of musicians. His three brothers were musicians. His mother was a classical pianist and his father, Fred Van Eps, was a ragtime banjoist. George Van Eps began playing banjo when he was eleven years old. After hearing Eddie Lang
Eddie Lang
on the radio, he put down the banjo and devoted himself to guitar. By the age of thirteen, in 1926, he was performing on the radio
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Gretsch
Gretsch
Gretsch
is an American company that manufactures guitars, basses and drums. The company was founded in 1883 in Brooklyn, New York by Friedrich Gretsch, a 27-year-old German immigrant, shortly after his arrival to the United States. Friedrich Gretsch
Gretsch
manufactured banjos, tambourines, and drums until his death in 1895. In 1916, his son, Fred Gretsch
Gretsch
Sr. moved operations to a larger facility where Gretsch
Gretsch
went on to become one of the most prominent manufacturers of American musical instruments. Most modern-era Gretsch
Gretsch
guitars are manufactured in the Far East, though American-made "Custom Shop" models are available. In 2002, Gretsch
Gretsch
entered a business agreement with Fender Musical Instruments Corporation (FMIC). Under the terms of that agreement Fred W
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Bucky Pizzarelli
John Paul "Bucky" Pizzarelli (born January 9, 1926) is an American jazz guitarist. He is the father of jazz guitarist John Pizzarelli
John Pizzarelli
and double bassist Martin Pizzarelli. He worked for NBC as a staffman for Dick Cavett
Dick Cavett
(1971) and ABC with Bobby Rosengarden in (1952). The list of musicians he has collaborated with includes Benny Goodman, Les Paul, and Stéphane Grappelli. Pizzarelli cites as influences Django Reinhardt, Freddie Green, and George Van Eps.[1][2]Contents1 Early life 2 Later life and career 3 Personal life 4 Guitars 5 Awards and honors 6 Discography 7 References 8 External linksEarly life[edit] Pizzarelli was born January 9, 1926 in Paterson, New Jersey. He learned to play guitar and banjo at a young age. His uncles, Pete and Bobby Domenick, were professional musicians, and sometimes the extended family would gather at one of their homes with their guitars for jam sessions
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Howard Alden
Howard Alden
Howard Alden
(born October 17, 1958) is an American jazz guitarist born in Newport Beach, California. Alden has recorded many albums for Concord Records, including four with seven-string guitar innovator George Van Eps.Contents1 Early life 2 Musical career 3 Personal life 4 Sweet and Lowdown 5 Awards 6 Discography6.1 As leader 6.2 As sideman7 References 8 External linksEarly life[edit] Howard Vincent Alden was born in Newport Beach, California
Newport Beach, California
on October 17, 1958.[1][2] He grew up in Huntington Beach, playing piano, harmonica, the four-string tenor guitar, and then four-string banjo at age ten.[1] After hearing recordings of Barney Kessel, Charlie Christian, Django Reinhardt
Django Reinhardt
and other jazz guitar greats, he got a six-string guitar and started teaching himself to play
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Ron Eschete
Ronald Patrick Escheté (August 19, 1948) is an American seven-string jazz guitarist. He is the first person to record a cover version of "Christmas Time Is Here", which Vince Guaraldi wrote for the Charlie Brown television program.[1]Contents1 Career 2 Discography2.1 As leader3 References 4 External linksCareer[edit] When Escheté was fourteen, he began playing guitar. During the late 1960s, he studied classical guitar and flute at Loyola University in New Orleans. From 1969–1970, he worked in Last Vegas supporting singer Buddy Greco. He moved to Los Angeles, where he played with Dave Pike and Gene Harris.[2] Escheté has been an educator since the early 1970s when he taught at community colleges in southern California. In the mid 1970s, he began teaching at the Musicians Institute in Hollywood and in the 1990s at California State University at Long Beach
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John Pizzarelli
John Paul Pizzarelli Jr. (born April 6, 1960) is an American jazz guitarist and vocalist. He has recorded over twenty solo albums and has appeared on more than forty albums by other recording artists, including Paul McCartney, James Taylor, Rosemary Clooney; his father, jazz guitarist Bucky Pizzarelli; and his wife, singer Jessica Molaskey.Contents1 Career 2 Discography2.1 As leader 2.2 As sideman or guest3 References 4 External linksCareer[edit] The son of swing guitarist Bucky Pizzarelli, John Pizzarelli
John Pizzarelli
was born in Paterson, New Jersey. He started on guitar when he was six and played trumpet through his college years.[1] He attended Don Bosco Preparatory High School, an all-boys Catholic school
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Semi-acoustic Guitar
A semi-acoustic guitar or hollow-body electric is a type of electric guitar that originates from the 1930s. It has both a sound box and one or more electric pickups. This is not the same as an acoustic-electric guitar, which is an acoustic guitar with the addition of pickups or other means of amplification, added by either the manufacturer or the player.Contents1 History 2 Usage 3 Variations 4 Gallery 5 Examples 6 ReferencesHistory[edit] In the 1930s guitar players and manufacturers were attempting to increase the overall volume of the guitar, which had a hard time competing in loudness with other instruments—especially in large orchestras and jazz bands.[1] This led makers to try a series of designs that focused on amplifying a guitar electrically through a loudspeaker. In 1936, Gibson made their first production run of electric guitars
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Samba
Samba
Samba
(Portuguese pronunciation: [ˈsɐ̃bɐ] ( listen)) is a Brazilian musical genre and dance style, with its roots in Africa via the West African slave trade and African religious traditions, particularly of Angola and the Congo, through the samba de roda genre of the northeastern Brazilian state
Brazilian state
of Bahia, from which it derived.[1] Although there were various forms of samba in Brazil
Brazil
with popular rhythms originated from drumming, samba as a music genre has its origins in Rio de Janeiro, the former capital of Brazil. Samba
Samba
is recognized around the world as a symbol of Brazil
Brazil
and the Brazilian Carnival
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Archtop Guitar
An archtop guitar is a hollow steel-stringed acoustic or semi-acoustic guitar with a full body and a distinctive arched top, whose sound is particularly popular with jazz, blues, rockabilly and psychobilly guitarists. Typically, an archtop guitar has:6 strings An arched top and back, not a flat top and back A hollow body Moveable adjustable bridge F-holes similar to members of the violin family Rear mounted tailpiece, stoptail bridge or Bigsby tremolo 14th-fret neck joinContents1 History 2 Construction 3 Various use of the term archtop 4 Bass guitars 5 Other variations 6 See also 7 References 8 Bibliography 9 External linksHistory[edit]A 1918 "The Gibson" acoustic guitar, with a 13th fret neck join, circular soundhole and floating bridge. This was a transitional model with no f-holes and a much smaller body than the classic archtop.The archtop guitar is often credited[1] to Orville Gibson, whose innovative designs led to the formation of the Gibson Mandolin-Guitar Mfg
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