HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Set Dance
A country dance is any of a large number of social dances of the British Isles in which couples dance together in a figure or "set", each dancer dancing to his or her partner and each couple dancing to the other couples in the set.[1] A set consists most commonly of two or three couples, sometimes four and rarely five or six. Often dancers follow a "caller" who names each change in the figures. Introduced to France and then Germany and Italy in the course of the 17th century, country dances gave rise to the contradanse, one of the significant dance forms in classical music. Introduced to America by French immigrants, it remains popular in the United States as contra dance and had great influence upon Latin American music as contradanza. The Anglais (from the French word meaning "English") or Angloise is another term for the English country dance.[2][3] A Scottish country dance
Scottish country dance
may be termed an Ecossaise
[...More...]

"Set Dance" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Country Dance (other)
A country dance is a social dance form in which two or more couples dance together in a set. Country Dance
Country Dance
may also refer to: Country Dance
[...More...]

"Country Dance (other)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mambo (dance)
Mambo is a Latin dance
Latin dance
of Cuba. Mambo was invented during the 1930s by the native Cuban musician and composer Arsenio Rodríguez,[1] developed in Havana
Havana
by Cachao
Cachao
and made popular by Dámaso Pérez Prado and Benny Moré.Contents1 History of dance
History of dance
form 2 Americanization 3 See also 4 References 5 External links History of dance
History of dance
form[edit] In the late 1940s, Perez Prado
Perez Prado
came up with the dance for the mambo music and became the first person to market his music as "mambo", meaning "conversation with the gods" in the Kongo language, spoken by Congolese. After Havana, Prado moved his music to Mexico, where his music and the dance was adopted. The original mambo dance was characterized by freedom and complicated foot-steps
[...More...]

"Mambo (dance)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Quadrille
The quadrille is a dance that was fashionable in late 18th- and 19th-century Europe and its colonies. Performed by four couples in a rectangular formation, it is related to American square dancing. The Lancers, a variant of the quadrille, became popular in the late 19th century and was still danced in the 20th century in folk-dance clubs. A derivative found in the Francophone Lesser Antilles
Lesser Antilles
is known as kwadril, and the dance is also still found in Madagascar
Madagascar
and is within old Jamaican / Caribbean culture. The quadrille consists of a chain of four to six contredanses, courtly versions of English country dances that had been taken up at the court of Louis XIV
Louis XIV
and spread across Europe
[...More...]

"Quadrille" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cotillion
The cotillion (also cotillon or "French country dance") is a social dance, popular in 18th-century Europe and America. Originally for four couples in square formation, it was a courtly version of an English country dance, the forerunner of the quadrille and, in the United States, the square dance. It was for some fifty years regarded as an ideal finale to a ball but was eclipsed in the early 19th century by the quadrille. It became so elaborate that it was sometimes presented as a concert dance performed by trained and rehearsed dancers
[...More...]

"Cotillion" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Les Lanciers
Les Lanciers
Les Lanciers
or The Lancers is a square dance, a variant of the Quadrille, a set dance performed by four couples, particularly popular in the 18th and 19th centuries. It is a composite dance made up of five figures or tours, each performed four times so that each couple dances the lead part. It exists in many variants in several countries. Widespread though it was throughout Europe, Les Lanciers
Les Lanciers
became less fashionable by the beginning of the 20th century. It has survived as a popular dance in Denmark
Denmark
to the present day,[1] having been introduced from England
England
in 1860. The Danish dance took its current form before the 1st World War
[...More...]

"Les Lanciers" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Jane Austen
Jane Austen
Jane Austen
(UK: /ˈɒstɪn/; 16 December 1775 – 18 July 1817) was an English novelist known primarily for her six major novels, which interpret, critique and comment upon the British landed gentry at the end of the 18th century. Austen's plots often explore the dependence of women on marriage in the pursuit of favourable social standing and economic security. Her works critique the novels of sensibility of the second half of the 18th century and are part of the transition to 19th-century literary realism.[2][b] Her use of biting irony, along with her realism and social commentary, have earned her acclaim among critics and scholars. With the publications of Sense and Sensibility
Sense and Sensibility
(1811), Pride and Prejudice (1813), Mansfield Park
Mansfield Park
(1814) and Emma (1816), she achieved success as a published writer
[...More...]

"Jane Austen" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Charles Dickens
Charles John Huffam Dickens (/ˈdɪkɪnz/; 7 February 1812 – 9 June 1870) was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world's best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era.[1] His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime, and by the 20th century critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories enjoy lasting popularity.[2][3] Born in Portsmouth, Dickens left school to work in a factory when his father was incarcerated in a debtors' prison
[...More...]

"Charles Dickens" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Thomas Hardy
Thomas Hardy, OM (2 June 1840 – 11 January 1928) was an English novelist and poet. A Victorian realist in the tradition of George Eliot, he was influenced both in his novels and in his poetry by Romanticism, especially William Wordsworth.[1] He was highly critical of much in Victorian society, especially on the declining status of rural people in Britain, such as those from his native South West England. While Hardy wrote poetry throughout his life and regarded himself primarily as a poet, his first collection was not published until 1898
[...More...]

"Thomas Hardy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Scotland
Scotland
Scotland
(/ˈskɒtlənd/; Scots: [ˈskɔtlənd]; Scottish Gaelic: Alba
Alba
[ˈal̪ˠapə] ( listen)) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and covers the northern third of the island of Great Britain.[16][17][18] It shares a border with England
England
to the south, and is otherwise surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean, with the North Sea
North Sea
to the east and the North Channel and Irish Sea
Irish Sea
to the south-west. In addition to the mainland, the country is made up of more than 790 islands,[19] including the Northern Isles
Northern Isles
and the Hebrides. The Kingdom of Scotland
Kingdom of Scotland
emerged as an independent sovereign state in the Early Middle Ages
Early Middle Ages
and continued to exist until 1707
[...More...]

"Scotland" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Virginia Reel (dance)
The Virginia reel is a folk dance that dates from the 17th century. Though the reel may have its origins in Scottish country dance
Scottish country dance
and the Highland reel, and perhaps have an even earlier influence from an Irish dance
Irish dance
called the Rinnce Fada, it is generally considered to be an English country dance. The dance was most popular in America from 1830–1890. The Virginia reel was a popular dance, and in each area there would be slight differences. This has given rise to a large number of dances called the Virginia reel. All of the versions have certain similarities, such as the reel figure.Contents1 The dance 2 Variations 3 Step 4 Calls 5 Music 6 ReferencesThe dance[edit] Described below is one version of the Virginia reel. The dancers usually line up in two lines of 5-8 couples, partners facing each other. Traditionally men would line up on one side, and women on the other, but that is not necessary
[...More...]

"Virginia Reel (dance)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Danzon
Danzón
Danzón
is the official musical genre and dance of Cuba.[1] It is also an active musical form in Mexico, and is still much loved in Puerto Rico. Written in 2 4 time, the danzón is a slow, formal partner dance, requiring set footwork around syncopated beats, and incorporating elegant pauses while the couples stand listening to virtuoso instrumental passages, as characteristically played by a charanga or tipica ensemble.[2] The danzón evolved from the Cuban contradanza, or habanera (literally, 'Havana-dance'). The contradanza, which had English and French roots in the country dance and contredanse, was probably introduced to Cuba
Cuba
by the Spanish, who ruled the island for almost four centuries (1511–1898), contributing many thousands of immigrants
[...More...]

"Danzon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cha-cha-cha (dance)
The cha-cha-chá, or simply cha-cha in the U.S., is a dance of Cuban origin.[1][2] It is danced to the music of the same name introduced by Cuban composer and violinist Enrique Jorrin in the early 1950's. This rhythm was developed from the danzón-mambo. The name of the dance is an onomatopoeia derived from the shuffling sound of the dancers' feet.[3]Contents1 Origin 2 Description2.1 Basic step of cha-cha-chá 2.2 Hip movement3 International Latin style cha-cha 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksOrigin[edit]Cha-cha rhythmIn the early 1950s, Enrique Jorrín worked as a violinist and composer with the charanga group Orquesta América. The group performed at dance halls in Havana where they played danzón, danzonete, and danzon-mambo for dance-orientated crowds. Jorrín noticed that many of the dancers at these gigs had difficulty with the syncopated rhythms of the danzón-mambo
[...More...]

"Cha-cha-cha (dance)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Beauchamp-Feuillet Notation
Beauchamp–Feuillet notation is a system of dance notation used in Baroque dance.eight bars of a dance recorded and published by Feuillet in 1700The notation was commissioned by Louis XIV (who had founded the Académie Royale de Danse
Académie Royale de Danse
in 1661), and devised in the 1680s by Pierre Beauchamp. The notation system was first described in detail in 1700 by Raoul-Auger Feuillet
Raoul-Auger Feuillet
in Chorégraphie. Feuillet also then began a programme of publishing complete notated dances
[...More...]

"Beauchamp-Feuillet Notation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Haitian Revolution
Haitian victoryFrench colonial government expelled Massacre of the FrenchTerritorial changes Independent Empire of Haiti
Haiti
establishedBelligerents1791–1793 Ex-slaves French royalists Spain
Spain
(from 1793) 1791–1793
[...More...]

"Haitian Revolution" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Swedish Language
Swedish ( svenska (help·info) [²svɛnːska]) is a North Germanic language spoken natively by 9.6 million people, predominantly in Sweden
Sweden
(as the sole official language), and in parts of Finland, where it has equal legal standing with Finnish. It is largely mutually intelligible with Norwegian and to some extent with Danish, although the degree of mutual intelligibility is largely dependent on the dialect and accent of the speaker. Both Norwegian and Danish are generally easier to read than to listen to because of difference in accent and tone when speaking. Swedish is a descendant of Old Norse, the common language of the Germanic peoples
Germanic peoples
living in Scandinavia during the Viking Era
[...More...]

"Swedish Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.