HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Serial Port
In computing, a serial port is a serial communication interface through which information transfers in or out one bit at a time (in contrast to a parallel port).[1] Throughout most of the history of personal computers, data was transferred through serial ports to devices such as modems, terminals, and various peripherals. While such interfaces as Ethernet, FireWire, and USB
USB
all send data as a serial stream, the term "serial port" usually identifies hardware more or less compliant to the RS-232
RS-232
standard, intended to interface with a modem or with a similar communication device. Modern computers without serial ports may require serial-to-USB converters to allow compatibility with RS-232
RS-232
serial devices. Serial ports are still used in applications such as industrial automation systems, scientific instruments, point of sale systems and some industrial and consumer products
[...More...]

"Serial Port" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

10P10C
A modular connector is an electrical connector that was originally designed for use in telephone wiring, but has since been used for many other purposes. Many applications that originally used a bulkier, more expensive connector have converted to modular connectors. Probably the best known applications of modular connectors are for telephone and Ethernet. Modular connectors were originally used in the Registration Interface system, mandated by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in 1976 in which they became known as registered jacks. The registered jack specifications define the wiring patterns of the jacks, not the physical dimensions or geometry of the connectors of either gender. Instead, these latter aspects are covered by ISO standard 8877, first used in ISDN systems
[...More...]

"10P10C" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Two-way Radio
A two-way radio is a radio that can do both transmit and receive a signal (a transceiver), unlike a broadcast receiver which only receives content. A two-way radio (transceiver) allows the operator to have a conversation with other similar radios operating on the same radio frequency (channel). Two-way radios are available in mobile, stationary base and hand-held portable configurations. Hand-held radios are often called walkie-talkies, handie-talkies or hand-helds. Two-way radio
Two-way radio
systems usually operate in a half-duplex mode; that is, the operator can talk, or he can listen, but not at the same time. A push-to-talk or Press To Transmit button activates the transmitter; when it is released the receiver is active
[...More...]

"Two-way Radio" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Microcomputer
A microcomputer is a small, relatively inexpensive computer with a microprocessor as its central processing unit (CPU).[2] It includes a microprocessor, memory, and minimal input/output (I/O) circuitry mounted on a single printed circuit board.[3] Microcomputers became popular in the 1970s and 1980s with the advent of increasingly powerful microprocessors. The predecessors to these computers, mainframes and minicomputers, were comparatively much larger and more expensive (though indeed present-day mainframes such as the IBM System z machines use one or more custom microprocessors as their CPUs)
[...More...]

"Microcomputer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Vendor Lock-in
In economics, vendor lock-in, also known as proprietary lock-in or customer lock-in, makes a customer dependent on a vendor for products and services, unable to use another vendor without substantial switching costs
[...More...]

"Vendor Lock-in" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pin Header
A pin header (often abbreviated as PH, or simply header) is a form of electrical connector. It consists of one or more rows of male pins typically spaced 2.54 millimetres (0.1 in) apart, but common sizes also include 5.08 millimetres (0.2 in), 5.00 millimetres (0.197 in), 3.96 millimetres (0.156 in), 2.00 millimetres (0.079 in), 1.27 millimetres (0.05 in) and 1.00 millimetre (0.04 in).[1] The distance between pins is commonly referred as pitch in the electronic community. In the past, a pin header was known as a Berg connector, but the term fell out of favor because pin headers are manufactured by many companies.Contents1 Overview 2 Shrouded or Box header 3 Polarizer key 4 Pin numbering 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksOverview[edit] Pin headers are often associated with ribbon cable connectors, pin headers often also function as recipients for jumpers
[...More...]

"Pin Header" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Data Circuit-terminating Equipment
A data circuit-terminating equipment[1] (DCE) is a device that sits between the data terminal equipment (DTE) and a data transmission circuit. It is also called data communication(s) equipment[2] and data carrier equipment.[citation needed] Usually, the DTE device is the terminal (or computer), and the DCE is a modem. In a data station, the DCE performs functions such as signal conversion, coding, and line clocking and may be a part of the DTE or intermediate equipment. Interfacing equipment may be required to couple the data terminal equipment (DTE) into a transmission circuit or channel and from a transmission circuit or channel into the DTE.Contents1 Usage 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksUsage[edit] Although the terms are most commonly used with RS-232, several data communication standards define different types of interfaces between a DCE and a DTE. The DCE is a device that communicates with a DTE device in these standards
[...More...]

"Data Circuit-terminating Equipment" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

IBM PC-AT
The IBM Personal Computer AT, more commonly known as the IBM AT and also sometimes called the PC AT or PC/AT, was IBM's second-generation PC, designed around the 6 MHz Intel 80286 microprocessor and released in 1984 as System Unit 5170. The name AT stood for "Advanced Technology," and was chosen because the AT offered various technologies that were then new in personal computers; one such advancement was that the 80286 processor supported protected mode.[3] IBM later released an 8 MHz version of the AT.Contents1 AT features 2 Power supply 3 Problems 4 Clones 5 BIOS revisions 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksAT features[edit]AT bus: The AT motherboard had a 16-bit data bus and 24-bit address bus (16 MB) that was backward compatible with PC-style expansion cards (which were 8-bit data, 20-bit address). Fifteen IRQs and seven DMA channels, expanded from eight IRQs and four DMA channels for the PC (and XT)
[...More...]

"IBM PC-AT" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Graphing Calculator
A graphing calculator (also graphics / graphic display calculator) is a handheld computer that is capable of plotting graphs, solving simultaneous equations, and performing other tasks with variables. Most popular graphing calculators are also programmable, allowing the user to create customized programs, typically for scientific/engineering and education applications. Because they have large displays in comparison to standard 4-operation handheld calculators, graphing calculators also typically display several lines of text and calculations at the same time.Contents1 History 2 Features2.1 Computer algebra systems 2.2 Laboratory usage 2.3 Games3 Graphing calculators in education 4 Programming 5 See also 6 References 7 Further readingHistory[edit] Casio
Casio
fx-7000G; The world's first graphing calculator Casio
Casio
produced the first commercially available graphing calculator, the fx-7000G, in 1985
[...More...]

"Graphing Calculator" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Amateur Radio
Amateur radio
Amateur radio
(also called ham radio) describes the use of radio frequency spectrum for purposes of non-commercial exchange of messages, wireless experimentation, self-training, private recreation, radiosport, contesting, and emergency communication. The term "amateur" is used to specify "a duly authorised person interested in radioelectric practice with a purely personal aim and without pecuniary interest;"[1] (either direct monetary or other similar reward) and to differentiate it from commercial broadcasting, public safety (such as police and fire), or professional two-way radio services (such as maritime, aviation, taxis, etc.). The amateur radio service (amateur service and amateur-satellite service) is established by the International Telecommunication
Telecommunication
Union (ITU) through the Radio Regulations
[...More...]

"Amateur Radio" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Macintosh
The Macintosh
Macintosh
(/ˈmækɪnˌtɒʃ/ MAK-in-tosh; branded as Mac since 1998) is a family of personal computers designed, manufactured, and sold by Apple Inc.
Apple Inc.
since January 1984
[...More...]

"Macintosh" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Input/output
In computing, input/output or I/O (or, informally, io or IO) is the communication between an information processing system, such as a computer, and the outside world, possibly a human or another information processing system. Inputs are the signals or data received by the system and outputs are the signals or data sent from it. The term can also be used as part of an action; to "perform I/O" is to perform an input or output operation. I/O devices are the pieces of hardware used by a human (or other system) to communicate with a computer. For instance, a keyboard or computer mouse is an input device for a computer, while monitors and printers are output devices. Devices for communication between computers, such as modems and network cards, typically perform both input and output operations. The designation of a device as either input or output depends on perspective
[...More...]

"Input/output" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

RS-422
RS-422, also known as TIA/EIA-422, is a technical standard originated by the Electronic Industries Alliance
Electronic Industries Alliance
that specifies electrical characteristics of a digital signaling circuit. Differential signaling can transmit data at rates as high as 10 Mbit/s, or may be sent on cables as long as 1500 meters. Some systems directly interconnect using RS-422
RS-422
signals, or RS-422
RS-422
converters may be used to extend the range of RS-232
RS-232
connections
[...More...]

"RS-422" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mini-DIN Connector
The mini-DIN connectors are a family of multi-pin electrical connectors used in a variety of applications. Mini-DIN is similar to the larger, older DIN connector. Both are standards of the Deutsches Institut für Normung, the German standards body.The color-coded PS/2 connection ports (purple for keyboards and green for mice) on the rear of a personal computer.PS/2 socket pin numbering. Note that the male plug numbering is a mirror image, with numbers going from left to right.An S-video
S-video
connector. Because this is a female connector, Pin 1 is at lower right.Mini-DIN connectors are 9.5 mm in diameter and come in seven patterns, with the number of pins from three to nine. Each pattern is keyed in such a way that a plug with one pattern cannot be mated with any socket of another pattern
[...More...]

"Mini-DIN Connector" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

PowerBook
The PowerBook
PowerBook
(known as Macintosh
Macintosh
PowerBook
PowerBook
before 1997) is a family of Macintosh
Macintosh
laptop computers designed, manufactured and sold by Apple Computer, Inc. from 1991 to 2006. During its lifetime, the PowerBook went through several major revisions and redesigns, often being the first to incorporate features that would later become standard in competing laptops.[1] The PowerBook
PowerBook
line was targeted at the professional market, and received numerous awards, especially in the second half of its life, such as the 2001 Industrial Design Excellence Awards "Gold" status, and Engadget's 2005 " Laptop
Laptop
of the Year"
[...More...]

"PowerBook" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Registered Jack
A registered jack (RJ) is a standardized telecommunication network interface for connecting voice and data equipment to a service provided by a local exchange carrier or long distance carrier. Registration interfaces were first defined in the Universal Service Ordering Code (USOC) system of the Bell System
Bell System
in the United States for complying with the registration program for customer-supplied telephone equipment mandated by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in the 1970s.[1] They were subsequently codified in title 47 of the Code of Federal Regulations
Code of Federal Regulations
Part 68.[2][3][4] The specification includes physical construction, wiring, and signal semantics. Accordingly, registered jacks are primarily named by the letters RJ, followed by two digits that express the type. Additionally, letter suffixes indicate minor variations
[...More...]

"Registered Jack" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.