HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Serge (fabric)
Serge is a type of twill fabric that has diagonal lines or ridges on both sides,[1] made with a two-up, two-down weave. The worsted variety is used in making military uniforms, suits, great coats and trench coats. Its counterpart, silk serge, is used for linings. French serge is a softer, finer variety. The word is also used for a high quality woolen woven fabric.[2] Etymology and history[edit] The name is derived from Old French
Old French
serge, itself from Latin
Latin
serica, from Greek σηρικός (serikos), meaning "silken".[3] The early association of silk serge, Greece, and France is shown by the discovery in Charlemagne's tomb of a piece of silk serge dyed with Byzantine motifs, evidently a gift from the Byzantine Imperial Court in the 8th or 9th century AD. It also appears to refer to a form of silk twill produced in the early renaissance in or around Florence, used for clerical cassocks
[...More...]

"Serge (fabric)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Calais
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Calais
Calais
(UK: /ˈkæleɪ/, US: /kæˈleɪ/, traditionally /ˈkælɪs/; French: [kalɛ]; Picard: Calés; Dutch: Kales) is a town and major ferry port in northern France
France
in the department of Pas-de-Calais, of which it is a sub-prefecture. Although Calais
Calais
is by far the largest city in Pas-de-Calais, the department's prefecture is its third-largest city of Arras
[...More...]

"Calais" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ancient Greek Language
The Ancient Greek language
Greek language
includes the forms of Greek used in ancient Greece
Greece
and the ancient world from around the 9th century BC to the 6th century AD. It is often roughly divided into the Archaic period (9th to 6th centuries BC), Classical period (5th and 4th centuries BC), and Hellenistic period
Hellenistic period
(Koine Greek, 3rd century BC to the 4th century AD). It is antedated in the second millennium BC by Mycenaean Greek and succeeded by medieval Greek. Koine is regarded as a separate historical stage of its own, although in its earliest form it closely resembled Attic Greek
Attic Greek
and in its latest form it approaches Medieval Greek
[...More...]

"Ancient Greek Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Calvinism
Calvinism
Calvinism
(also called the Reformed tradition, Reformed Christianity, Reformed Protestantism, or the Reformed faith) is a major branch of Protestantism
Protestantism
that follows the theological tradition and forms of Christian practice of John Calvin
John Calvin
and other Reformation-era theologians. Calvinists broke from the Roman Catholic Church
Catholic Church
in the 16th century. Calvinists differ from Lutherans on the real presence of Christ
Christ
in the Eucharist, theories of worship, and the use of God's law for believers, among other things.[1][2] As declared in the Westminster and Second Helvetic confessions, the core doctrines are predestination and election
[...More...]

"Calvinism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

French Wars Of Religion
Uneasy Catholic- Protestant
Protestant
truce House of Bourbon
House of Bourbon
gains the French throne through Henry IV
[...More...]

"French Wars Of Religion" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Eighty Years' War
Peace of Münster Spain
Spain
recognises the independence of the Dutch Republic Spain
Spain
retains the Southern NetherlandsBelligerents United Provinces  England  France Spanish EmpireCommanders and leaders William the Silent † Maurice of Orange Frederic
[...More...]

"Eighty Years' War" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Low Countries
The Low Countries
Low Countries
or, in the geographic sense of the term, the Netherlands
Netherlands
(Dutch: de Lage Landen or de Nederlanden, French: les Pays Bas) is a coastal region in northwestern Europe, consisting especially of the Netherlands
Netherlands
and Belgium, and the low-lying delta of the Rhine, Meuse, Scheldt, and Ems rivers where much of the land is at or below sea level.[1][2] This wide area of Western Europe
Europe
roughly stretches from the French département du Nord at its southwestern point, to German East Frisia
East Frisia
at its northeastern point. The Netherlands
Netherlands
is often considered to include inland areas with strong links, such as Luxembourg
Luxembourg
today, and historically, parts of the German Rhineland
[...More...]

"Low Countries" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Monopoly
A monopoly (from Greek μόνος mónos ["alone" or "single"] and πωλεῖν pōleîn ["to sell"]) exists when a specific person or enterprise is the only supplier of a particular commodity. This contrasts with a monopsony which relates to a single entity's control of a market to purchase a good or service, and with oligopoly which consists of a few sellers dominating a market.[2] Monopolies are thus characterized by a lack of economic competition to produce the good or service, a lack of viable substitute goods, and the possibility of a high monopoly price well above the seller's marginal cost that leads to a high monopoly profit.[3] The verb monopolise or monopolize refers to the process by which a company gains the ability to raise prices or exclude competitors. In economics, a monopoly is a single seller
[...More...]

"Monopoly" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Don Quixote
Don Quixote
Don Quixote
(/ˌdɒn kiːˈhoʊti, ˌdɒn ˈkwɪksoʊt/;[1] Spanish: [doŋ kiˈxote] ( listen)), fully titled The Ingenious Nobleman Sir Quixote of La Mancha
La Mancha
(Early Modern Spanish: El Ingenioso Hidalgo Don Quixote
Don Quixote
de la Mancha or EL INGENIOSO HIDALGO DON QVIXOTE DE LA MANCHA; Modern Spanish: El Ingenioso Hidalgo Don Quijote de la Mancha, pronounced [el iŋxeˈnjoso iˈðalɣo ðoŋ kiˈxote ðe la ˈmantʃa]), is a Spanish novel by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra. Published in two volumes, in 1605 and 1615, Don Quixote
Don Quixote
is considered the most influential work of literature from the Spanish Golden Age and the entire Spanish literary canon
[...More...]

"Don Quixote" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Byzantine Empire
The Byzantine
Byzantine
Empire, also referred to as the Eastern Roman Empire, was the continuation of the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in the East during Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages, when its capital city was Constantinople
Constantinople
(modern-day Istanbul, which had been founded as Byzantium). It survived the fragmentation and fall of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in the 5th century AD and continued to exist for an additional thousand years until it fell to the Ottoman Turks in 1453.[2] During most of its existence, the empire was the most powerful economic, cultural, and military force in Europe
[...More...]

"Byzantine Empire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Charlemagne
Charlemagne
Charlemagne
(/ˈʃɑːrləmeɪn/) or Charles
Charles
the Great[a] (2 April 742[1][b] – 28 January 814), numbered Charles
Charles
I, was King of the Franks
Franks
from 768, King of the Lombards
Lombards
from 774 and Holy Roman Emperor from 800. He united much of western and central Europe during the early Middle Ages. He was the first recognised emperor to rule from western Europe since the fall of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
three centuries earlier.[2] The expanded Frankish state that Charlemagne founded is called the Carolingian
Carolingian
Empire
[...More...]

"Charlemagne" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Latin
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
[...More...]

"Latin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Old French
Old French
Old French
(franceis, françois, romanz; Modern French: ancien français) was the language spoken in Northern France
France
from the 8th century to the 14th century. In the 14th century, these dialects came to be collectively known as the langue d'oïl, contrasting with the langue d'oc or Occitan language
Occitan language
in the south of France
[...More...]

"Old French" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Red Serge
The Red Serge
Red Serge
refers to the jacket of the dress uniform of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. It consists of a scarlet British-style military pattern tunic, complete with a high-neck collar and blue breeches with yellow stripe identifying a cavalry history.Contents1 Constables and non-commissioned officers 2 Commissioned officers 3 History 4 In popular culture 5 External linksConstables and non-commissioned officers[edit] Constables (Cst) and non-commissioned officers (NCOs) wear the red serge tunic with blue gorget patches on their collars and epaulettes of navy blue. Metal collar dogs of the RCMP badge are worn on the neck. Constables and NCOs wear embroidered firearms qualification badges on the bottom of their left sleeve, and their embroidered specialist trade badge on the right sleeve. If a second specialist badge is earned, the least current is worn below the firearms qualification badges
[...More...]

"Red Serge" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

International Standard Serial Number
An International Standard Serial Number
International Standard Serial Number
(ISSN) is an eight-digit serial number used to uniquely identify a serial publication.[1] The ISSN is especially helpful in distinguishing between serials with the same title. ISSN are used in ordering, cataloging, interlibrary loans, and other practices in connection with serial literature.[2] The ISSN system was first drafted as an International Organization for Standardization (ISO) international standard in 1971 and published as ISO 3297 in 1975.[3] ISO subcommittee TC 46/SC 9 is responsible for maintaining the standard. When a serial with the same content is published in more than one media type, a different ISSN is assigned to each media type. For example, many serials are published both in print and electronic media
[...More...]

"International Standard Serial Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.