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Serer History
The medieval history of the Serer people
Serer people
of Senegambia
Senegambia
is partly characterised by resisting
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John Donnelly Fage
John
John
is a common English name and surname: John
John
(given name) John
John
(surname), including a list of people with the name John John
John
may also refer to:Contents1 People with the given name1.1 Religious figures 1.2 Rulers and other political figures 1.3 Other religious figures2 Fictional characters 3 Songs 4 Other uses 5 See alsoPeople with the given name[edit] Religious figures[edit] John the Baptist
John the Baptist
(died c. 30 AD), regarded as a prophet and the forerunner of Jesus Christ John the Apostle
John the Apostle
(c
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Kingdom Of Saloum
Kingdom
Kingdom
may refer to:Contents1 Monarchy 2 Taxonomy 3 Arts and media3.1 Television 3.2 Music 3.3 Other media4 People 5 Other 6 See alsoMonarchy[edit] Further information: List of kingdoms A type of monarchy:A realm ruled bya king a queen regnantTaxonomy[edit] Kingdom
Kingdom
(taxonomy), a category in biological taxonomyArts and media[edit] Television[edit] Kingdom
Kingdom
(UK TV series), a 2007 British television drama starring Stephen Fry Kingdom
Kingdom
(U.S
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Portuguese People
Portuguese people
Portuguese people
are a ethnic group indigenous to Portugal
Portugal
that share a common Portuguese culture and speak Portuguese as a primary language. Their predominant religion is Christianity, mainly Roman Catholicism. Historically the Portuguese people's heritage includes the pre-Celts, Celts
Celts
(Celtiberians, Lusitanians, Gallaecians
Gallaecians
and Celtici) the Romans, Greeks, Scandinavians, and migratory Germanic tribes like the Vandals, Visigoths
Visigoths
(Western Goths) and Suebi. The Roman Republic
Roman Republic
conquered the Iberian Peninsula
Iberian Peninsula
during the 2nd and 1st centuries B.C. from the extensive maritime empire of Carthage during the series of Punic Wars. As a result of Roman colonization, the majority of local languages stem from the Vulgar Latin
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Mbissel
Mbissel is a village in the west of Sénégal. It is situated in the region of Fatick. The population is overrun by the Serer people.[1][2]Contents1 History 2 Notes 3 See also 4 External linksHistory[edit] Mbissel was the capital of the first Guelowar king of Sine - Maad a Sinig Maysa Wali Jaxateh Manneh commonly known as Maysa Wali Jon. Maysa Wali made it his capital in the 14th century.[3] The area just like the whole of Sine and Saloum has many historical monuments.[4] The traditional site of the tomb of Maysa Wali is located in Mbissel.[5] Notes[edit]^ Dennis Charles Galvan. The state must be our master of fire: how peasants craft sustainable development in Senegal. University of California Press, 2004. ISBN 0-520-23591-6. p 54 ^ Mbissel, the site of PEPAM ^ M. Gueye, Les Guélowares et le Sine, Éthiopiques (revue), n° 28, p. 174-181, 1982. ^ Senegal, Ministry of Culture Department ^ Jean-Marc Gastellu. L'égalitarisme économique des Serer du Sénégal. p303
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Faye (surname)
Faye is a typical Serer surname - an ethnic group found in Senegal, Gambia and Mauritania. This Serer surname is unrelated to the similar given name in the Western world
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Slave Raiding
Slave raiding
Slave raiding
is a military raid for the purpose of capturing people and bringing them out of the raid area to serve as slaves. Sometimes seen as a normal part of warfare, it is nowadays widely considered a crime.[citation needed] Slave raiding
Slave raiding
has occurred since antiquity. Some of the earliest surviving written records of slave raiding come from Sumer
Sumer
(in present-day Iraq). The act of slave raiding involves an organized and concerted attack on a settlement with the purpose of taking the areas' people. The collected new slaves are often kept in some form of slave pen or depot. From there, the slave takers will transport them to a distant place by means such as a slave ship or camel caravan
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Cultural Assimilation
Cultural assimilation is the process in which a minority group or culture resembles those of a dominant group. The term is used to refer to both individuals and groups; the latter case can refer to a range of social groups, including ethnic minorities, immigrants, indigenous peoples, and other marginalized groups such as sexual minorities who adapt to being culturally dominated by another societal group. Cultural assimilation may involve either a quick or a gradual change depending on circumstances of the group. Full assimilation occurs when members of a society become indistinguishable from those of the dominant group. Whether it is desirable for a given group to assimilate is often disputed by both members of the group and those of the dominant society
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Offspring
In biology, offspring are the young born of living organisms, produced either by a single organism or, in the case of sexual reproduction, two organisms. Collective offspring may be known as a brood or progeny in a more general way. This can refer to a set of simultaneous offspring, such as the chicks hatched from one clutch of eggs, or to all the offspring, as with the honeybee. Human offspring (descendants) are referred to as children (without reference to age, thus one can refer to a parent's "minor children" or "adult children" or "infant children" or "teenage children" depending on their age); male children are sons and female children are daughters (see kinship and descent). Offspring
Offspring
can occur after mating or after artificial insemination. Offspring
Offspring
contains many parts and properties that are precise and accurate in what they consist of, and what they define
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Atlantic Slave Trade
The Atlantic slave trade
Atlantic slave trade
or transatlantic slave trade involved the transportation by slave traders of enslaved African people, mainly from Africa
Africa
to the Americas, and then their sale there. The slave trade used mainly the triangular trade route and its Middle Passage, and existed from the 16th to the 19th centuries. The vast majority of those who were enslaved and transported in the transatlantic slave trade were Africans from central and western Africa, who had been sold by other West Africans to Western European slave traders (with a small number being captured directly by the slave traders in coastal raids), who brought them to the Americas.[1] The South Atlantic and Caribbean economies especially were dependent on the supply of secure labour for the production of commodity crops, making goods and clothing to sell in Europe
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Mandinka People
The Mandinka (also known as Mandenka, Mandinko, Mandingo, Manding or Malinke)[9] are an African ethnic group with an estimated global population of 11 million (the other three largest ethnic groups in Africa
Africa
being the unrelated Fula, Hausa and Songhai peoples). The Mandinka are the descendants of the Mali
Mali
Empire, which rose to power in the 13th century under the rule of the Malinké/Maninka king Sundiata Keita. The Mandinka are one ethnic group within the larger linguistic family of the Mandé
Mandé
peoples, who account for more than 90 million people. (Other Mande peoples include the Dyula, Bozo, Bissa and Bambara). Originally from Mali, the Mandinka gained their independence from previous empires in the 13th century and founded an empire which stretched across Africa
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Caravel
A caravel (Portuguese: caravela, IPA: [kɐɾɐˈvɛlɐ]) is a small, highly maneuverable sailing ship developed in the 15th century by the Portuguese to explore along the West African coast and into the Atlantic Ocean. The lateen sails gave it speed and the capacity for sailing windward (beating). Caravels were used by the Portuguese for the oceanic exploration voyages during the 15th and 16th centuries in the Age of Discovery
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Kaabu
The Kaabu
Kaabu
Empire
Empire
(1537–1867), also written Gabu, Ngabou, and N’Gabu', was a Mandinka kingdom of Senegambia
Senegambia
centered within modern northeastern Guinea-Bissau
Guinea-Bissau
but extending into Casamance
Casamance
in Senegal. It rose to prominence in the region thanks to its origins as a former province of the Mali Empire. After the decline of the Mali Empire, Kaabu
Kaabu
became an independent kingdom
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Guinea Bissau
Guinea- Bissau
Bissau
(/ˈɡɪni bɪˈsaʊ/ ( listen)), officially the Republic
Republic
of Guinea- Bissau
Bissau
(Portuguese: República da Guiné-Bissau [ʁeˈpublikɐ dɐ ɡiˈnɛ biˈsaw]), is a sovereign state in West Africa. It covers 36,125 square kilometres (13,948 sq mi) with an estimated population of 1,815,698.[2] Guinea- Bissau
Bissau
was once part of the kingdom of Gabu, as well as part of the Mali
Mali
Empire. Parts of this kingdom persisted until the 18th century, while a few others were under some rule by the Portuguese Empire since the 16th century. In the 19th century, it was colonized as Portuguese Guinea. Upon independence, declared in 1973 and recognised in 1974, the name of its capital, Bissau, was added to the country's name to prevent confusion with Guinea
Guinea
(formerly French Guinea)
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Battle Of Kansala
The Battle of Kansala or Final Battle (Mandinka: Tourban Kello) or Siege of Kansla was a military engagement between forces of the Kaabu Empire and the Imamate of Futa Jallon. The battle resulted in the end of the Mandinka hegemony began by the Mali Empire
Mali Empire
on Africa’s Atlantic coast.Contents1 Background1.1 Kaabu forces 1.2 Futa Jallon forces2 The siege 3 The battle 4 Aftermath 5 See also 6 References 7 SourcesBackground[edit] The Kaabu Empire, which began as an outpost of the Mali Empire
Mali Empire
in what is now Guinea-Bissau, had imposed Mandinka rule through military and economic dominance over much of Upper Guinea. In 1537, Kaabu broke completely away from the Mali Empire
Mali Empire
under its own line of rulers called the mansaba (great king). They expanded aggressively into neighboring Wolof, Serer and Fula territories. By 1705, Kaabu was the uncontested power in the region
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Waalo
Walo (Wolof: Waalo; French: Walo, Oualo) was a kingdom on the lower Senegal River
Senegal River
in West Africa, in what are now Senegal
Senegal
and Mauritania. It included parts of the valley proper and areas north and south, extending to the Atlantic Ocean. To the north were Moorish emirates; to the south was the kingdom of Cayor; to the east was Jolof. Waalo
Waalo
had a complicated political and social system, which has a continuing influence on Wolof culture in Senegal
Senegal
today, especially its highly formalized and rigid caste system. The kingdom was indirectly hereditary, ruled by three matrilinial families: the Logar, the Tedyek and the Joos, all from different ethnic backgrounds. The Joos were of Serer origin. This Serer matriclan was established in Waalo
Waalo
by Lingeer Ndoye Demba of Sine
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