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Sequim, Washington
Sequim /ˈskwɪm/ ( listen) is a city in Clallam County, Washington, United States. The 2010 census counted a population of 6,606. Sequim with the surrounding area has a population of about 28,000. Sequim is located along the Dungeness River
Dungeness River
near the base of the Olympic Mountains. The population served by the Sequim School District population was over 26,000 in 2018.[5] The city has been increasing in population in recent years due to the influx of retirees seeking good weather and a relaxed lifestyle. Sequim lies within the rain shadow of the Olympic Mountains
Olympic Mountains
and receives on average less than 16 inches (410 mm) of rain per year—about the same as Los Angeles, California—and has given itself the nickname of Sunny Sequim. Yet the city is fairly close to some of the wettest temperate rainforests of the contiguous United States
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City
A city is a large human settlement.[4][5] Cities generally have extensive systems for housing, transportation, sanitation, utilities, land use, and communication. Their density facilitates interaction between people, government organizations and businesses, sometimes benefiting different parties in the process. Historically, city-dwellers have been a small proportion of humanity overall, but following two centuries of unprecedented and rapid urbanization, roughly half of the world population now lives in cities, which has had profound consequences for global sustainability.[6] Present-day cities usually form the core of larger metropolitan areas and urban areas—creating numerous commuters traveling towards city centers for employment, entertainment, and edification
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Garry Oak
Quercus garryana, the Garry oak, Oregon
Oregon
white oak, Oregon
Oregon
oak, or Hu'dshnam, from the traditional Klamath language, is a tree species with a range stretching from southern California
California
to southwestern British Columbia. It grows from sea level to 210 meters (690 ft) altitude in the northern part of its range, and at 300 to 1,800 meters (980 to 5,910 ft) in the south of the range in California. The tree gets one of its names from Nicholas Garry, deputy governor of the Hudson's Bay Company, 1822–35.[3]Contents1 Range 2 Varieties 3 Growth characteristics 4 Natural History 5 Uses 6 Conservation 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksRange[edit] In British Columbia, the Garry oak grows on the Gulf Islands
Gulf Islands
and southeastern Vancouver Island, from west of Victoria along the east side of the island up to the Campbell River area
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Juan De Fuca Strait
The Strait of Juan de Fuca
Juan de Fuca
(officially named Juan de Fuca
Juan de Fuca
Strait in Canada[1]) is a large body of water about 154 kilometres (96 mi) long[2] that is the Salish Sea's outlet to the Pacific Ocean. The international boundary between Canada
Canada
and the United States
United States
runs down the center of the Strait. It was named in 1787 by the maritime fur trader Charles William Barkley, captain of the Imperial Eagle, for Juan de Fuca, the Greek navigator who sailed in a Spanish expedition in 1592 to seek the fabled Strait of Anián
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Douglas-fir
Pseudotsuga
Pseudotsuga
menziesii, commonly known as Douglas fir, Douglas-fir and Oregon
Oregon
pine, is an evergreen conifer species native to western North America. One variety, the coast Douglas fir, grows along the Pacific Ocean from central British Columbia
British Columbia
south to central California. A second variety, the Rocky Mountain Douglas fir, grows in the Rocky Mountains from British Columbia
British Columbia
south to Mexico. The tree is dominant in western Washington and Oregon. It is extensively used for timber, worldwide.Contents1 Naming 2 Description 3 Distribution 4 Ecology 5 Uses 6 See also 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksNaming[edit] The common name honors David Douglas, a Scottish botanist and collector who first reported the extraordinary nature and potential of the species
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Western Red Cedar
Thuja
Thuja
plicata, commonly called western[2] or Pacific redcedar,[3] giant or western arborvitae,[3] giant cedar,[3] or shinglewood,[3] is a species of Thuja, an evergreen coniferous tree in the cypress family Cupressaceae
Cupressaceae
native to western North America. It is not a true cedar of the genus Cedrus.Contents1 Distribution 2 Description 3 Taxonomy and name 4 Notable specimens 5 Uses5.1 Timber 5.2 Cultivation6 Role in indigenous societies6.1 History 6.2 Tools 6.3 Wood 6.4 Bark7 Legal status 8 Health and safety 9 See also 10 References 11 Works cited 12 External linksDistribution[edit] Thuja
Thuja
plicata is among the most widespread trees in the Pacific Northwest. It is associated with Douglas-fir and western hemlock in most places where it grows
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Black Cottonwood
Populus
Populus
trichocarpa, the black cottonwood,[1] western balsam-poplar[2] or California
California
poplar, is a deciduous broadleaf tree species native to western North America. It is used for timber, and is notable as a model organism in plant biology. Its full genome sequence was published in 2006. It is the first tree species to be sequenced.Contents1 Description1.1 Reproduction2 Distribution 3 Cultivation 4 Use as a model species 5 Lumber 6 Uses 7 Genome7.1 Characteristics 7.2 General information 7.3 Somatic mosaicism8 Nomenclature 9 References 10 Further readingDescription[edit] It is a large tree, growing to a height of 30 metres (98 ft) to 50 metres (160 ft) and a trunk diameter of over 2 metres (6.6 ft), which makes it the largest poplar species in the Americas. It is normally fairly short-lived, but some trees may live for up to 400 years (Forbes 2006)
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Red Alder
Alnus rubra, the red alder,[2][3] is a deciduous broadleaf tree native to western North America
North America
(Alaska, Yukon, British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, California, Idaho
Idaho
and Montana).[1][4]Contents1 Description 2 Distribution 3 Ecology3.1 Commonly associated trees 3.2 In marginal habitat 3.3 As pioneer species 3.4 Role as wildlife fodder 3.5 As soil enricher4 Uses4.1 As dye 4.2 Traditional medicine usage 4.3 In restoration 4.4 In woodworking 4.5 In fish smoking 4.6 As an environmental indicator5 Forestry 6 Gallery 7 References 8 Further references and external linksDescription[edit] Red alder is the largest species of alder in North America
North America
and one of the largest in the world, reaching heights of 20 to 30 m (66 to 98 ft). The official tallest red alder (1979) stands 32 m (105 ft) tall in Clatsop County, Oregon
Oregon
(USA)
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Bigleaf Maple
Acer macrophyllum, the bigleaf maple[2] or Oregon maple,[3] is a large deciduous tree in the genus Acer. It can grow up to 48.79 metres (160 ft 1 in) tall,[4][5] but more commonly reaches 15–20 m (50–65 ft) tall. It is native to western North America, mostly near the Pacific
Pacific
coast, from southernmost Alaska
Alaska
to southern California
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Pacific Madrone
Arbutus
Arbutus
menziesii, the Pacific madrone or madrona, is a species of tree in the family Ericaceae, native to the western coastal areas of North America, from British Columbia
British Columbia
to California.Contents1 Common names 2 Description 3 Distribution and habitat 4 Cultivation 5 Uses 6 Conservation 7 Largest specimen burned 8 References 9 Works cited 10 External linksCommon names[edit] Arbutus
Arbutus
menziesii lignotuber near ground level provides fire-resistant storage of energy and sprouting buds if fire damage requires replacement of the trunk or limbs.It is also known as the madroa,[3] madroño, madroña, or bearberry. The name "strawberry tree" (A. unedo) may also be found in relation to A. menziesii (though it has no relation to the strawberry fruit)
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Lodgepole Pine
Pinus
Pinus
contorta, with the common names lodgepole pine and shore pine, and also known as twisted pine,[2] and contorta pine,[2] is a common tree in western North America.[3] It is common near the ocean shore and in dry montane forests to the subalpine, but is rare in lowland rain forests.[4][5] Like all pines (member species of the genus Pinus), it is an evergreen conifer.Contents1 Subspecies 2 Description2.1 Needles and buds 2.2 Cones3 Ecology3.1 Threats4 Uses4.1 Construction4.1.1 Native American tipis4.2 Medicinal 4.3 Cultivation 4.4 Emblem5 Invasive species 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksSubspecies[edit] There are four subspecies of Pinus
Pinus
contorta, and one of them is sometimes considered to have two varieties.[6] The subspecies are sometimes treated at the rank of variety.[7][8][9] Pinus
Pinus
contorta subsp
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Mollisol
Mollisols are a soil order in USDA soil taxonomy. Mollisols form in semi-arid to semi-humid areas, typically under a grassland cover. They are most commonly found in the mid-latitudes, namely in North America, mostly east of the Rocky Mountains, in South America
South America
in Argentina (Pampas) and Brazil, and in Asia
Asia
in Mongolia
Mongolia
and the Russian Steppes. Their parent material is typically base-rich and calcareous and include limestone, loess, or wind-blown sand. The main processes that lead to the formation of grassland Mollisols are melanisation, decomposition, humification and pedoturbation. Mollisols have deep, high organic matter, nutrient-enriched surface soil (A horizon), typically between 60–80 cm in depth. This fertile surface horizon, known as a mollic epipedon, is the defining diagnostic feature of Mollisols
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Temperate Rainforest
Temperate rainforests
Temperate rainforests
are coniferous or broadleaf forests that occur in the temperate zone and receive heavy rainfall. Temperate rain forests occur in oceanic moist regions around the world: the Pacific temperate rain forests
Pacific temperate rain forests
of North American Pacific Northwest; the Valdivian temperate rain forests
Valdivian temperate rain forests
of southwestern South America; the rain forests of New Zealand, Tasmania
Tasmania
and southeastern Australia; northwest Europe (small pockets in the British Isles, Iceland, and larger areas in southern Norway
Norway
and northern Iberia); southern Japan; and the eastern Black Sea- Caspian Sea
Caspian Sea
region of Turkey, Georgia and northern Iran. The moist conditions of temperate rain forests generally support an understory of mosses, ferns and some shrubs
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Base Saturation
Cation-exchange capacity
Cation-exchange capacity
(CEC) is a measure of how many cations can be retained on soil particle surfaces.[1] Negative charges on the surfaces of soil particles bind positively-charged atoms or molecules (cations), but allow these to exchange with other positively charged particles in the surrounding soil water.[2] This is one of the ways that solid materials in soil alter the chemistry of the soil. CEC affects many aspects of soil chemistry, and is used as a measure of soil fertility, as it indicates the capacity of the soil to retain several nutrients (e.g. K+, NH4+, Ca2+) in plant-available form. It also indicates the capacity to retain pollutant cations (e.g
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Lavender
Lavandula
Lavandula
(common name lavender) is a genus of 47 known species of flowering plants in the mint family, Lamiaceae. It is native to the Old World
Old World
and is found from Cape Verde
Cape Verde
and the Canary Islands, Europe across to northern and eastern Africa, the Mediterranean, southwest Asia to southeast India. Many members of the genus are cultivated extensively in temperate climates as ornamental plants for garden and landscape use, for use as culinary herbs, and also commercially for the extraction of essential oils
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Exchange Student
A student exchange program is a program in which students from a secondary school or university study abroad at one of their institution's partner institutions.[1] A student exchange program may involve international travel, but does not necessarily require the student to study outside his or her home country. For example, the National Student Exchange program (NSE) offers placements throughout the United States and Canada.[2] Foreign exchange programs provides students with an opportunity to study in a different country and environment experiencing the history and culture of another country.[3] The term "exchange" means that a partner institution accepts a student, but does not necessarily mean that the students have to find a counterpart from the other institution with whom to exchange. Exchange students live with a host family or in a designated place such as a hostel, an apartment, or a student lodging. Costs for the program vary by the country and institution
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