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Seoul
Seoul
Seoul
(/soʊl/; 서울; Korean: [sʌ.ul] ( listen)), officially the Seoul
Seoul
Special
Special
Metropolitan City – is the capital[10] and largest metropolis of the Republic of Korea
Korea
(commonly known as South Korea).[1] Seoul
Seoul
forms the heart of the Seoul
Seoul
Capital Area, and includes the surrounding Incheon
Incheon
metropolis and Gyeonggi province, altogether home to roughly half of the country's population.[11][12] Strategically situated on the Han River, Seoul's history stretches back over two thousand years, when it was founded in 18 BC by the people of Baekje, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. The city was later designated the capital of Korea
Korea
under the Joseon
Joseon
dynasty
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Mayor–council Government
The mayor–council government system is a system of organization of local government. It is one of the two most common forms of local government in the United States and is also used in Canada. It is the one most frequently adopted in large cities, although the other form, council–manager government, is the typical local government form of more municipalities. Characterized by having a mayor who is elected by the voters, the mayor–council variant may be broken down into two main variations depending on the relationship between the legislative and executive branches, becoming a weak-mayor or a strong-mayor variation based upon the powers of the office
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List Of Special Cities Of South Korea
Special or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit]Special (album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special" (Mew song), 2005 "Special" (Stephen Lynch song), 2000 The Specials, a British band "Special", a song by Violent Femmes on The Blind Leading the Naked "Special", a song on The Documentary album by GameFilm and television[edit]Special (lighting), a stage light that is used for a single, specific purpose "Special" (Lost), an episode of the television series Lost Special (film) The Specials (film) Television special, television programming that temporarily replaces scheduled programmingOther uses[edit]A special price, a form of discounts and allowances A kit car or one-off home built vehicle A euphemism for someone with a disability, especially an intellectual disability Adcox Special, a biplane built in Portland, Oregon in 1929 The SPECIAL Sys
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Kim Byung-kee
Kim Byung-kee (born July 10, 1961) is a South Korean member of parliament of the Minjoo Party of Korea.[1][2] References[edit]^ "North Korea nuclear test: 'warhead explosion' confirmed by Pyongyang – as it happened World news". The Guardian. 2016-09-09. Retrieved 2016-09-17.  ^ "S.Korea spy agency seen concerned over North's advances in miniaturising warheads". Reuters. 2016-09-09. Retrieved 2016-09-17. This article about a South Korean politician is a stub
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Revised Romanization
The Revised Romanization of Korean
Romanization of Korean
(국어의 로마자 표기법; gugeoui romaja pyogibeop. op; lit. "Roman-letter notation of the national language") is the official Korean language romanization system in South Korea
South Korea
proclaimed by the Ministry of Culture and Tourism to replace the older McCune–Reischauer
McCune–Reischauer
system. The new system eliminates diacritics in favor of digraphs and adheres more closely to Korean phonology than to a suggestive rendition of Korean phonetics for non-native speakers. The Revised Romanization limits itself to the ISO basic Latin alphabet, apart from limited, often optional use of the hyphen. It was developed by the National Academy of the Korean Language from 1995 and was released to the public on 7 July 2000 by South Korea's Ministry of Culture and Tourism in Proclamation No
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McCune–Reischauer
McCune–Reischauer
McCune–Reischauer
romanization (/məˈkuːn ˈraɪʃaʊ.ər/) is one of the two most widely used Korean language
Korean language
romanization systems. A modified version of McCune–Reischauer
McCune–Reischauer
was the official romanization system in South Korea
South Korea
until 2000, when it was replaced by the Revised Romanization of Korean
Romanization of Korean
system. A variant of McCune–Reischauer
McCune–Reischauer
is still used as the official system in North Korea.[citation needed] The system was created in 1937 by George M. McCune and Edwin O. Reischauer
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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National Assembly Of South Korea
Government[2]     Democratic (121)Opposition parties     Liberty Korea (116)      Bareun Future (30)      Peace and Justice group (20)     Democracy and Peace (14)      Justice (6)     Minjung (1)      Korean Patriots (1)      Independents (4)Vacant     Vacant
Vacant
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Seocho District
A district is a type of administrative division that, in some countries, is managed by local government
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In Jae-keun
In Jae-keun is a South Korean politician and democracy activist. In 1985, her husband Kim Geun-tae
Kim Geun-tae
was arrested and tortured by the government of Chun Doo-hwan
Chun Doo-hwan
for his pro-democracy activism.[1] In 1987, In was awarded the Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights Award along with her husband for her role in publicly exposing his detention and torture.[2] After Kim's death, she was elected as member of national assembly for Dobong A, Seoul
Seoul
in 2012. Dobong A was Kim's constituency from 1996 to 2008. References[edit]^ "Mr. Geun Tae Kim: Minister Ministry of Health and Welfare". Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. Archived from the original on 18 March 2012. Retrieved 4 July 2012.  ^ "1987: Kim Keun Tae & In Jae Keun, South Korea". Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice and Human Rights. Archived from the original on 22 September 2012
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Hanja
Hanja
Hanja
(Hangul: 한자; Hanja: 漢字; Korean pronunciation: [ha(ː)nt͈ɕa]) is the Korean name
Korean name
for Chinese characters (Chinese: 漢字; pinyin: hànzì).[1] More specifically, it refers to those Chinese characters
Chinese characters
borrowed from Chinese and incorporated into the Korean language
Korean language
with Korean pronunciation. Hanja-mal or Hanja-eo (the latter is more used) refers to words that can be written with Hanja, and hanmun (한문, 漢文) refers to Classical Chinese
Classical Chinese
writing, although "Hanja" is sometimes used loosely to encompass these other concepts. Because Hanja
Hanja
never underwent major reform, they are almost entirely identical to traditional Chinese and kyūjitai characters, though the stroke orders for some characters are slightly different
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Park Yong-jin
Park Yong-jin (Hangul: 박용진; Hanja: 朴用鎭; born 17 April 1971) is a South Korean labor activist and politician in the liberal Minjoo Party of Korea. He was elected member of the National Assembly for Gangbuk, Seoul, in the April 2016 parliamentary elections. Park was a founding member of the left-wing Democratic Labor Party, standing unsuccessfully as a parliamentary candidate in the Gyeongbuk B constituency in 2000 and serving as the party's spokesman from 2004.[1][2] He stayed with the DLP from its establishment in 2000 until 2008, when the party's pro–labor rights People's Democracy faction parted ways with the nationalist National Liberty faction.[3] Park followed the PD group to the splinter New Progressive Party
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Min Byung-doo
Min Byung-doo (Hangul: 민병두; Hanja: 閔丙梪; born 10 June 1958) is a South Korean politician in the liberal Minjoo Party of Korea who has been a member of the National Assembly for Dongdaemun, Seoul, since 2012. He was formerly a party list member from 2004 to 2008. Min is a proponent of economic democratization.[1] In early 2013 he announced plans to introduce legislation to protect fair contracts between convenience store franchisors and their franchisees.[2] Later that year, during an industrial dispute that led to K-pop group JYJ being blacklisted from major broadcasting stations, Min introduced a motion to call JYJ
JYJ
to testify before the National Assembly along with the founder of their former record label S.M. Entertainment, Lee Soo-man, and the president of the Korean Federation of Pop Culture and Art Industry, Yang Yi-sik
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Ahn Gyu-baek
Ahn Gyu-baek (Hangul: 안규백; Hanja: 安圭伯; born 29 April 1961) is a South Korean politician in the liberal Minjoo Party of Korea. He has been a member of the National Assembly for Dongdaemun, Seoul, since 2012, and previously served as a party list member from 2008 to 2012. Ahn was appointed deputy floor leader of the New Politics Alliance for Democracy, the Minjoo Party's predecessor, on 12 October 2014,[1] remaining in that position for seven months.[2] He was praised by his Saenuri Party counterpart, Cho Hae-jin, who described him as having an "honest and upright" character and "always thinking of his country first".[a] He subsequently became head of strategy and public relations for the NPAD on 23 June 2015.[3] A ranking member of the Assembly's National Defense Committee,[4] Ahn has been a critic of South Korea's defense policy
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Park Joo-min
Park Joo-min (Hangul: 박주민; Hanja: 朴柱民; born 21 November 1973) is a South Korean politician in the liberal Minjoo Party of Korea and has been a member of the National Assembly for Eunpyeong A, Seoul, since 2016.[1][2][3] References[edit]^ Ock, Hyun-ju (17 April 2016). "Korea marks two years since Sewol ferry tragedy". The Korea Herald. Retrieved 7 February 2018.  ^ "[초선 내 정치를 말한다] <20> 더민주 박주민". news.naver.com. 13 May 2016. Retrieved 7 February 2018.  ^ "Maverick Politicians - EP6 : Park Joo Min". Channel NewsAsia. 7 February 2018. Retrieved 7 February 2018. External links[edit]Park Joo-min on Facebook Park Joo-min on IMDbThis article about a Korean politician is a stub
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Hangul
Hangul
Hangul
(/ˈhɑːnˌɡuːl/ HAHN-gool;[1] from Korean hangeul 한글 [ha(ː)n.ɡɯl]) is the Korean alphabet. It has been used to write the Korean language
Korean language
since its creation in the 15th century under Sejong the Great.[2][3] It is the official writing system of South Korea
South Korea
and North Korea. It is a co-official writing system in the Yanbian Korean Autonomous Prefecture and Changbai Korean Autonomous County
Changbai Korean Autonomous County
in Jilin
Jilin
Province, China. It is sometimes used to write the Cia-Cia language
Cia-Cia language
spoken near the town of Bau-Bau, Indonesia. The alphabet consists of 19 consonants and 21 vowels. Hangul
Hangul
letters are grouped into syllabic blocks, vertically and horizontally
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