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Semper Fidelis
Semper fidelis
Semper fidelis
( Latin
Latin
pronunciation: [ˈsɛm.pɛr fɪˈdeː.lɪs]) is a Latin
Latin
phrase that means "always faithful" or "always loyal". It is the motto of the United States Marine Corps usually shortened to Semper fi. It is also in use as a motto for towns, families, schools, and military units. The earliest definitively recorded use of semper fidelis is as the motto of the French town of Abbeville
Abbeville
since 1369. It has also been used by other towns, and is recorded as the motto of various European families since the 16th century, and possibly since the 13th century or earlier. Records show many families in England, France
France
and Ireland using this motto. The earliest recorded use of semper fidelis by a military unit is by the Duke of Beaufort's Regiment of Foot, raised in south-western England in 1685
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Masonic Lodge
A Masonic lodge, often termed a private lodge or constituent lodge, is the basic organisational unit of Freemasonry. It is also commonly used as a term for a building in which such a unit meets. Every new lodge must be warranted or chartered by a Grand Lodge, but is subject to its direction only in enforcing the published constitution of the jurisdiction. By exception the three surviving lodges that formed the world's first known grand lodge in London (now merged into the United Grand Lodge
Grand Lodge
of England) have the unique privilege to operate as time immemorial, i.e., without such warrant; only one other lodge operates without a warrant – the Grand Stewards' Lodge in London, although it is not also entitled to the "time immemorial" title.[note 1] A Freemason is generally entitled to visit any Lodge in any jurisdiction (i.e., under any Grand Lodge) in amity with his own
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Polish-Bolshevik War
Polish victoryPeace of RigaTerritorial changes Poland
Poland
re-takes control of present-day western Ukraine
Ukraine
and we
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France
France
France
(French: [fʁɑ̃s]), officially the French Republic (French: République française [ʁepyblik fʁɑ̃sɛz]), is a country whose territory consists of metropolitan France
France
in western Europe, as well as several overseas regions and territories.[XIII] The metropolitan area of France
France
extends from the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
to the English Channel
English Channel
and the North Sea, and from the Rhine
Rhine
to the Atlantic Ocean. The overseas territories include French Guiana
French Guiana
in South America and several islands in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans
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Charles V Of France
Charles V (21 January 1338 – 16 September 1380), called the Wise (French: "le Sage"'; Latin: "Sapiens"), was a monarch of the House of Valois who ruled as King of France
France
from 1364 to his death. In 1349, as a young prince, Charles received from his grandfather King Philip VI the province of Dauphiné
Dauphiné
to rule. This allowed him to bear the title "Dauphin" until his coronation, which led to the integration of the Dauphiné
Dauphiné
into the crown lands of France. After 1350, all heirs apparent of France
France
bore the title of Dauphin until their accession. Charles became regent of France
France
when his father John II was captured by the English at the Battle of Poitiers
Battle of Poitiers
in 1356. To pay the ransom, Charles raised taxes
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Letters Patent
Letters patent
Letters patent
(always in the plural) are a type of legal instrument in the form of a published written order issued by a monarch, president, or other head of state, generally granting an office, right, monopoly, title, or status to a person or corporation. Letters patent can be used for the creation of corporations or government offices, or for the granting of city status or a coat of arms. Letters patent are issued for the appointment of representatives of the Crown, such as governors and governors-general of Commonwealth realms, as well as appointing a Royal Commission. In the United Kingdom they are also issued for the creation of peers of the realm. A particular form of letters patent has evolved into the modern patent (referred to as a utility patent or design patent in United States
United States
patent law) granting exclusive rights in an invention (or a design in the case of a design patent)
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Vincennes
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Vincennes
Vincennes
(French pronunciation: ​[vɛ̃sɛn]) is a commune in the Val-de-Marne
Val-de-Marne
department in the eastern suburbs of Paris, France. It is located 6.7 km (4.2 mi) from the centre of Paris
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Pope Alexander VII
Pope
Pope
Alexander VII (13 February 1599 – 22 May 1667), born Fabio Chigi, was Pope
Pope
from 7 April 1655 to his death in 1667.[1][2] He began his career as a vice-papal legate, and he held various diplomatic positions in the Holy See. He was ordained as a priest in 1634, and he became Bishop of Nardo
Bishop of Nardo
in 1635. He was later transferred in 1652, and he became Bishop of Imola. Pope
Pope
Innocent X
Innocent X
made him Secretary of State in 1651, and in 1652, he was appointed as a Cardinal. Early in his papacy, Alexander, who was seen as an anti-Nepotist at the time of his election, lived simply; later, however, he gave jobs to his relatives, who eventually took over his administration. His administration worked to support the Jesuits
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Poland
Coordinates: 52°N 20°E / 52°N 20°E / 52; 20 Republic
Republic
of Poland Rzeczpospolita
Rzeczpospolita
Polska  (Polish)FlagCoat of armsAnthem: "Mazurek Dąbro
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Polish-Ukrainian War
PolandRegional support: Romania (in Bukovina
Bukovina
and Pokuttia)  Hungary  CzechoslovakiaStrategic support:  France Ukraine WUPR (before 1919) Hutsul Republic (in Maramureș) Komancza Republic (in Lemkivshchyna
Lemkivshchyna

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Austro-Hungary
Austria-Hungary, often referred to as the Austro-Hungarian Empire
Empire
or the Dual Monarchy
Dual Monarchy
in English-language sources, was a constitutional union of the Austrian Empire
Austrian Empire
(the Kingdoms and Lands Represented in the Imperial Council, or Cisleithania) and the Kingdom of Hungary ( Lands of the Crown of Saint Stephen
Lands of the Crown of Saint Stephen
or Transleithania) that existed from 1867 to 1918, when it collapsed as a result of defeat in World War I. The union was a result of the Austro-Hungarian Compromise of 1867 and came into existence on 30 March 1867
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World War I
Allied victoryCentral Powers' victory on the Eastern Front nullified by defeat on the Western Front Fall of the German, Russian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian empires Russian Civil War
Russian Civil War
and foundation of the Soviet Union Formation of new countries in Europe
Europe
and the Middle East Transfer of German colonies
German colonies
and regions of the former Ottoman Empire to other powers Establishment of the League of Nations
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Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church
The Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church
Catholic Church
(UGCC) (Ukrainian: Українська греко-католицька церква (УГКЦ), translit. Ukrains'ka Hreko-Katolyts'ka Tserkva; Latin: Ecclesia Graeco-Catholica Ucrainae) is a Byzantine Rite
Byzantine Rite
Eastern Catholic Church
Catholic Church
in full communion with the Holy See. It is the second-largest particular church (sui juris) in the Catholic Church (after the Latin, or Roman, Church). The church is one of the successor churches to the acceptance of Christianity by Grand Prince
Grand Prince
Vladimir the Great
Vladimir the Great
of Kiev, in 988
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Ballechin
Ballechin is an estate in Logierait parish, Perthshire, Scotland located 3 miles west north-west of Ballinluig junction. The main residence on the estate is Ballechin House. Ballechin distillery operated between 1810 and 1927 and was one of seven original farm distilleries operating in Perthshire. Out of these seven, Edradour is the only one remaining. Since 2002, Edradour have resurrected the Ballechin brand of whisky. Later in life the distillery was operated by the Robertson Family and supplied a large range of customers both locally and to wine merchants in Edinburgh and Glasgow[citation needed]. The distillery eventually closed due to the diversion of the water source. References[edit]Francis Hindes Groome (1892–1896). Ordnance Gazetteer of Scotland - Volume 1. University of Edinburgh, Scotland. CS1 maint: Date format (link) Alfred Barnard (1887)
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Devon
Devon
Devon
(/ˈdɛvən/), also known as Devonshire, which was formerly its common and official name, is a county of England, reaching from the Bristol Channel
Bristol Channel
in the north to the English Channel
English Channel
in the south. It is part of South West England, bounded by Cornwall
Cornwall
to the west, Somerset
Somerset
to the northeast, and Dorset
Dorset
to the east
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Richard Izacke
Richard Izacke (c.1624–1698) of Devon was an antiquarian and lawyer who served as Chamberlain of the City of Exeter. His history, Antiquities of the City of Exeter, was first published in 1677.Contents1 Biography 2 Works 3 Notes 4 References 5 Further readingBiography[edit] Baptized on 8 February 1624 at Ottery St Mary, he was the eldest son of Samuel Izacke of Exeter,[1] who was apparently a lawyer and member of the Inner Temple (1617).[2] On 20 April 1641, Izacke was admitted as commoner to Exeter College, Oxford, but left the University at the end of 1642 because of the Civil War. In November 1641 he entered the Inner Temple and was called to the bar in 1650
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