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Selsley
Selsley
Selsley
is a village within the civil parish of King's Stanley
King's Stanley
and district of Stroud, in Gloucestershire, England. It is composed of around 175 houses, scattered around the western and eastern edge of a Cotswold
Cotswold
spur, located approximately 2 miles (3.2 km) south of Stroud. Selsley Common
Selsley Common
is an ancient place, but the name Selsley
Selsley
was only used for the settlement after the parish was created in 1863, with the village divided into Selsley
Selsley
West and Selsley
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List Of Sites Of Special Scientific Interest By Area Of Search
The following is a list of Sites of Special Scientific Interest
Sites of Special Scientific Interest
(SSSI) by Area of Search, in the United Kingdom. SSSIs are areas of conservation, consisting of protected areas, recognised for their biological or geological significance. In Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
an SSSI is called an Area of Special Scientific Interest (ASSI). The English counties were revised under the 1974 reorganisation of local government. Until the 2010s, Natural England, which maintains the database of English SSSIs, kept the listing of counties as it was in 1974, but by 2015 they had updated their lists to reflect later changes
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Severn Valley (England)
The Severn Valley
Severn Valley
is a rural area of mid-western England, through which the River Severn
River Severn
runs and the Severn Valley Railway
Severn Valley Railway
steam heritage line operates, starting at its northernmost point in Bridgnorth, Shropshire
Shropshire
and running south for 16 miles (26 km) to Ribbesford, a few miles south of Bewdley, Worcestershire
Worcestershire
in the Wyre Forest. The area is about 25 miles (40 km) due west of Birmingham
Birmingham
in the West Midlands region. There is also use of this term to apply to areas around the River Severn as far south as Gloucester, and as far north as Ironbridge. To the north of Bridgnorth, the area around the river becomes much steeper and is known as Ironbridge
Ironbridge
Gorge
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Spur (mountain)
A spur is a lateral ridge or tongue of land descending from a hill, mountain or main crest of a ridge.[1][2] Sometimes the term is used in sense of subpeak. Examples[edit] Examples of spurs are:Abbott Spur, which separates the lower ends of Rutgers Glacier
Rutgers Glacier
and Allison Glacier on the west side of the Royal Society Range
Royal Society Range
in Victoria Land, Antarctica Boott Spur, a subpeak of Mount Washington Kelley Spur, 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) east of Spear Spur on the south side of Dufek Massif
Dufek Massif
in the Pensacola Mountains, Antarctica Geneva Spur
Geneva Spur
on Mount EverestSee also[edit]Draw or re-entrant, the low ground between two spurs Spur castleReferences[edit]^ Valley, Ridge, Gully Terrain Features and Contour Lines at geokov.com. Accessed on 28 Feb 2013. ^ Valleys, Ridges and Spurs at www.askaboutireland.ie
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Manor House
A manor house was historically the main residence of the lord of the manor. The house formed the administrative centre of a manor in the European feudal system; within its great hall were held the lord's manorial courts, communal meals with manorial tenants and great banquets. The term is today loosely applied to various country houses, frequently dating from the late medieval era, which formerly housed the gentry. They were sometimes fortified, but this was frequently intended more for show than for defence. Manor
Manor
houses existed in most European countries where feudalism existed, where they were sometimes known as castles, palaces, and so on
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Elizabeth I
Elizabeth I (7 September 1533 – 24 March 1603)[1] was Queen of England and Ireland from 17 November 1558 until her death on 24 March 1603. Sometimes called The Virgin Queen, Gloriana
Gloriana
or Good Queen Bess, Elizabeth was the last monarch of the House of Tudor. Elizabeth was the daughter of Henry VIII
Henry VIII
and Anne Boleyn, his second wife, who was executed two-and-a-half years after Elizabeth's birth. Anne's marriage to Henry VIII
Henry VIII
was annulled, and Elizabeth was declared illegitimate. Her half-brother, Edward VI, ruled until his death in 1553, bequeathing the crown to Lady Jane Grey
Lady Jane Grey
and ignoring the claims of his two half-sisters, Elizabeth and the Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
Mary, in spite of statute law to the contrary. Edward's will was set aside and Mary became queen, deposing Lady Jane Grey
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Woodchester
Woodchester
Woodchester
is a Gloucestershire
Gloucestershire
village in the Nailsworth
Nailsworth
(or Woodchester) Valley, a valley in the South Cotswolds
Cotswolds
in England, running southwards from Stroud along the A46 road
A46 road
to Nailsworth. The parish population taken at the 2011 census was 1,206.[1] Woodchester
Woodchester
is approximately at the midpoint, about two miles south of Stroud. It is divided into North and South Woodchester, with a side valley between the two settlements. There are pubs in both North and South (The Royal Oak in North and The Ram in South) and a post office with a shop in North Woodchester. There was a post office (called Woodchester) in South Woodchester
Woodchester
but it closed, along with the shop, in June 2008
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Crataegus
Crataegus
Crataegus
(/krəˈtiːɡəs/;[3] from the Greek kratos "strength" and akis "sharp", referring to the thorns of some species[4]) commonly called hawthorn, thornapple,[5] May-tree,[6] whitethorn,[6] or hawberry, is a large genus of shrubs and trees in the family Rosaceae, native to temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere in Europe, Asia and North America. The name "hawthorn" was originally applied to the species native to northern Europe, especially the common hawthorn C. monogyna, and the unmodified name is often so used in Britain and Ireland. The name is now also applied to the entire genus and to the related Asian genus Rhaphiolepis
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Blackthorn
Prunus
Prunus
spinosa (blackthorn, or sloe) is a species of flowering plant in the rose family Rosaceae. It is native to Europe, western Asia, and locally in northwest Africa.[2][3] It is also locally naturalised in New Zealand, Tasmania
Tasmania
and eastern North America.[3]Contents1 Description 2 Etymology2.1 Sloe-eyed3 Ecology 4 Uses 5 See also 6 References 7 Bibliography 8 External linksDescription[edit]Plant in flower in early spring Prunus
Prunus
spinosa is a large deciduous shrub or small tree growing to 5 metres (16 ft) tall, with blackish bark and dense, stiff, spiny branches. The leaves are oval, 2–4.5 centimetres (0.79–1.77 in) long and 1.2–2 centimetres (0.47–0.79 in) broad, with a serrated margin
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Ash Tree
Fraxinus
Fraxinus
/ˈfræksɪnəs/,[4] English name ash, is a genus of flowering plants in the olive and lilac family, Oleaceae. It contains 45–65 species of usually medium to large trees, mostly deciduous though a few subtropical species are evergreen. The genus is widespread across much of Europe, Asia and North America.[3][5][6][7][8] The tree's common English name, "ash", traces back to the Old English æsc, while the generic name originated in Latin. Both words also mean "spear" in their respective languages.[9] The leaves are opposite (rarely in whorls of three), and mostly pinnately compound, simple in a few species. The seeds, popularly known as "keys" or "helicopter seeds", are a type of fruit known as a samara. Most Fraxinus
Fraxinus
species are dioecious, having male and female flowers on separate plants[10] but gender in ash is expressed as a continuum between male and female individuals, dominated by unisexual trees
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Beech
Beech
Beech
(Fagus) is a genus of deciduous trees in the family Fagaceae, native to temperate Europe, Asia
Asia
and North America. Recent classification systems of the genus recognize ten to thirteen species in two distinct subgenera, Engleriana and Fagus.[1][2] The Engleriana subgenus is found only in East Asia, and is notably distinct from the Fagus subgenus in that these beeches are low-branching trees, often made up of several major trunks with yellowish bark. Further differentiating characteristics include the whitish bloom on the underside of the leaves, the visible tertiary leaf veins, and a long, smooth cupule-peduncle. Fagus japonica, Fagus engleriana, and the species F
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Fault Scarp
A fault scarp is a small step or offset on the ground surface where one side of a fault has moved vertically with respect to the other.[1] It is the topographic expression of faulting attributed to the displacement of the land surface by movement along faults. They are exhibited either by differential movement and subsequent erosion along an old inactive geologic fault (a sort of old rupture), or by a movement on a recent active fault. Characteristics[edit] See also: Escarpment Fault scarps often contain highly fractured rock of both hard and weak consistency. In many cases, bluffs form from the upthrown block and can be very steep. The height of the scarp formation is equal to the vertical displacement along the fault. Active scarps are usually formed by tectonic displacement, e.g
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Black Mountains, Wales
The Black Mountains (Welsh: Y Mynyddoedd Duon) are a group of hills spread across parts of Powys
Powys
and Monmouthshire
Monmouthshire
in southeast Wales, and extending across the England– Wales
Wales
border into Herefordshire. They are the easternmost of the four ranges of hills that comprise the Brecon Beacons
Brecon Beacons
National Park, and are frequently confused with the westernmost, which is known as the Black Mountain. The Black Mountains may be roughly defined as those hills contained within a triangle defined by the towns of Abergavenny
Abergavenny
in the southeast, Hay-on-Wye
Hay-on-Wye
in the north and the village of Llangors
Llangors
in the west. Other gateway towns to the Black Mountains include Talgarth
Talgarth
and Crickhowell
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Brecon Beacons
The Brecon
Brecon
Beacons (Welsh: Bannau Brycheiniog) is a mountain range in South Wales. In a narrow sense, the name refers to the range of Old Red Sandstone peaks which lie to the south of Brecon. Sometimes referred to as "the central Beacons" they include South Wales' highest mountain, Pen y Fan. The range forms the central section of the Brecon Beacons National Park (Parc Cenedlaethol Bannau Brycheiniog), a designation which also encompasses ranges both to the east and the west of "the central Beacons". This much wider area is also commonly referred to as "the Brecon
Brecon
Beacons", and it includes the Black Mountains to the east as well as the similarly named but quite distinct Black Mountain to the west. The highest peaks include Fan Brycheiniog to the west and Pen y Fan
Pen y Fan
in the central part
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Bronze Age
The Bronze
Bronze
Age is a historical period characterized by the use of bronze, proto-writing, and other early features of urban civilization. The Bronze
Bronze
Age is the second principal period of the three-age Stone-Bronze- Iron
Iron
system, as proposed in modern times by Christian Jürgensen Thomsen, for classifying and studying ancient societies. An ancient civilization is defined to be in the Bronze
Bronze
Age either by producing bronze by smelting its own copper and alloying with tin, arsenic, or other metals, or by trading for bronze from production areas elsewhere
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